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View Full Version : Static holds good or bad for strength?



Clone
09-06-2009, 12:19 PM
I noticed an odd thing the other day.

After my conditioning workout I shoulder pressed a tire I have and held it at lockout and walked up and down my driveway as a finisher.

The next few days my shoulders were pretty sore. And thats the odd thing, no matter how hard I pound my shoulders with presses, laterals, or face pulls they never get sore.

They feel tired days after some workouts, but are never sore.

I don't plan on doing this for anything other than shoulders.

So am I onto something here? Or is it a moot point?

Good for strength?
Good for size?
Good for nothing? LOL

Virtron
09-06-2009, 01:25 PM
i think its good for just that holding weight in that position. In terms of strength i believe it might increase lockout strength for a shoulder press. I mean the only benefit i see in that is that after an exhausting set the bar wont fall on your head.

Travis Bell
09-06-2009, 06:20 PM
In my opinion, not a huge benefit to strength, however I've seen stuff like that before where people hold a bar with chains on it over their head and walk around, tires or even water tubes.

If you enjoy doing it, I'd say keep at it. Not everything has to be too thought out

Off Road
09-06-2009, 06:30 PM
It's probably good for the stabilizers, similar to a waiters walk.

joey54
09-06-2009, 06:48 PM
Maybe for added size, but its debateable. You aren't on to anything new, DC has his trainees do a static hold at the end of pressing exercises, and soem others. Probably of minimal benefit for most.

mastermonster
09-06-2009, 07:30 PM
I've never walked around with anything but I do occasionally do static holds (take outs) on the squat and bench press with more than I am pressing or squatting to accustom the body (and mind) to the feel of that amount of weight. That way the weight you will try at the meet doesn't feel so crushing if you've already held 50-100- or 150 lbs. more for an 8-10 count and re-racked it. It is then something that is familiar and the body and mind connection doesn't have an "Oh crap that's heavy!" moment on PR attempts. Today I did my last squat workout before my meet next week. It was all raw take outs up to 865 lbs. My goal is an 832 single ply squat if all goes well. I think doing these has helped in the past. I've done them geared up in the past with as much as 1030. When I attempted 903 at the meet it didn't feel as heavy as 900+ would before I started doing these occasionally. Note: The 903 attempt was multi-ply.

Brian Hopper
09-06-2009, 07:42 PM
It's probably good for the stabilizers, similar to a waiters walk.

I agree, I'm sure it's good to help out your stabilizers.

Virtron
09-06-2009, 08:19 PM
I've never walked around with anything but I do occasionally do static holds (take outs) on the squat and bench press with more than I am pressing or squatting to accustom the body (and mind) to the feel of that amount of weight. That way the weight you will try at the meet doesn't feel so crushing if you've already held 50-100- or 150 lbs. more for an 8-10 count and re-racked it. It is then something that is familiar and the body and mind connection doesn't have an "Oh crap that's heavy!" moment on PR attempts. Today I did my last squat workout before my meet next week. It was all raw take outs up to 865 lbs. My goal is an 832 single ply squat if all goes well. I think doing these has helped in the past. I've done them geared up in the past with as much as 1030. When I attempted 903 at the meet it didn't feel as heavy as 900+ would before I started doing these occasionally. Note: The 903 attempt was multi-ply.

i agree. You put it better than i did. Its like rack pulls above the knee.

Clone
09-06-2009, 09:59 PM
Thanks for the input guys.

I was just surprised to finally make my shoulders sore.

It was a great finisher, and really tests your mettle.

I could feel all sorts of little muscles working just trying to balance the tire.

I'll keep up with them and see what happens.