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Rob of Oz
09-08-2009, 12:07 AM
I am 36, male, 6ft tall and weigh 203lb.
My BMR (basal metabolic rate?) is 2005 Calories. Is this what is known as my 'maintenance' calories?
If so, then for me to increase my weight I would need to eat about 500cals above this to make gains, correct?
I'm only asking because I have seen huge numbers thrown around out there for people my weight eg 4000+ cals a day. And I feel I would just become a fat tub of lard eating that much...

Any advice GREATLY appreciated.
Cheers in Advance.

Rob.

LuNa
09-08-2009, 01:18 AM
Your BMR is what your body burns while you are doing nothing. However you also need to take into account the amount of exercise you are getting. I take it you calculated your BMR by using an online calculator. Normally they give you a multiplier for the amount of exercise you do in a week, from low to high. You will have to take that into account and then add 500 calories.

What is even better is writing down what you are currently eating for a week and seeing what your weight does. Calculators are very generic in nature and they could be completely wrong.

Joe Black
09-08-2009, 03:03 AM
Read the Bulk or Cut article (http://www.wannabebig.com/diet-and-nutrition/to-bulk-or-to-cut-that-is-the-question-or-is-it/) as it has some good advice for calculating daily calorie requirements.

Rob of Oz
09-09-2009, 06:16 PM
Read the Bulk or Cut article (http://www.wannabebig.com/diet-and-nutrition/to-bulk-or-to-cut-that-is-the-question-or-is-it/) as it has some good advice for calculating daily calorie requirements.

Yeah, I did read that article, and while i think it's good, I couldn't find out how to work out one thing. Below is from the article:

If hitting 235 lbs. at 8.5% BF is your goal, rather than bulk beyond that weight and cut, I would recommend that you determine the maintenance requirements for a 235 lb. man at 8.5% BF and consume this maintenance level of calories, day in and day out, until you hit 235 lbs. at 8.5% BF, thus avoiding ‘do I bulk or cut’ scenario.

How do you work out the maintenance levels for 235lb at 8.5% body fat?
Or 220lb at 12% body fat etc?

Any advice greatly appreciated.
Cheers in Advance,
Rob.

LuNa
09-09-2009, 06:52 PM
This topic might help you.

http://www.wannabebig.com/forums/showthread.php?t=128120

Joe Black
09-10-2009, 04:11 AM
Yeah, I did read that article, and while i think it's good, I couldn't find out how to work out one thing. Below is from the article:

If hitting 235 lbs. at 8.5% BF is your goal, rather than bulk beyond that weight and cut, I would recommend that you determine the maintenance requirements for a 235 lb. man at 8.5% BF and consume this maintenance level of calories, day in and day out, until you hit 235 lbs. at 8.5% BF, thus avoiding ‘do I bulk or cut’ scenario.

How do you work out the maintenance levels for 235lb at 8.5% body fat?
Or 220lb at 12% body fat etc?

Any advice greatly appreciated.
Cheers in Advance,
Rob.

Rob, the thread LuNalicious covers your question specifically. :)

Daniel may well hump in too and see if he can help you. Perhaps send him a pm?

Daniel Roberts
09-10-2009, 07:42 AM
Hi Rob

Thanks for the PM, thought I'd answer in public though in case anyone else has the same queries.

I'll make the most important points first. Bodyfat percentage is rather arbitrary, if consistent measurements are taken by the same method, then it becomes more relevant, in that it catalogues change and gives you a reasonably accurate reference point.

With that said the multipliers in the article were calculated using a rough target bodyfat percentage of 10%, which for most trainees is a decent level of leanness and a good target at any bodyweight.
If you specifically want a bodyfat percentage above that then see the advice below about adjustments.

Below 10% and you're starting to ask a lot of your body, in that it doesn't really want to relinquish stored energy in the form of fat whilst maintaining an above average level of muscle mass. At this level of development the game changes.

It is in these instances that I would recommend non-linear calorie intake ie on training days calorie intake is higher (this can be almost thoughtlessly incorporated through workout nutrition) and on non-training days it is lower, although at the end of the week the total calories consumed is the same.

Anywhere around (specifically above) that approx 10% bf target and the differences in calorie intake (irrespective of approach, see this sticky http://www.wannabebig.com/forums/showthread.php?t=128939 ) are small enough to be nullified by the recommended 250kcal adjustments.

Don't overthink it, I'm happy to go through any figures you like, but rest assured the differences between the calorie intake of a man at 220lbs with 10%bf aren't going to be that different from a guy at 230lbs with 12% and so on - we're talking 100 kcal differences here.

Variances of these magnitudes occur between people of identical body composition, simply because of hormonal status, metabolic rate, activity levels, stress levels, nervous energy expenditure and so forth.

So adjustments will need to be made regardless to suit your particular physiology, work out a calorie intake (by this method or another - they'll not differ much) and test drive it for a couple of weeks, then adjust as necessary.

brihead301
09-10-2009, 07:53 AM
Just experiment, that's what I always do. If I want to gain weight, I eat more....If I don't gain, I start eating slightly more....I keep adjusting until I'm gaining (or losing, depending on what your goals are). Don't overcomplicate it. It's really very simple.

digitaldream
09-14-2009, 01:23 PM
I hope this guide you:
Basal metabolic rate is usually by far the largest component of total caloric expenditure. However, the Harris-Benedict equations are only approximate and variation in BMR (reflecting varying body composition), in physical activity levels, and in energy expended in thermogenesis make it difficult to estimate the dietary consumption any particular individual needs in order to maintain body weight. 2000 calories is often quoted but is no more than a guideline.

More info here:en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basal_metabolic_rate