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View Full Version : Louie's article in PLUSA Sept 09



sobrinoc
09-08-2009, 06:28 PM
Hey guys,

Usually I can follow Louie's articles pretty well but this one flew over my head. Anyone read it? Care to explain to me?

Travis Bell
09-08-2009, 07:06 PM
hmm, I'd love to, however I don't now which article is in this months PLUSA and I don't get it regularly. I'll see if I can find a copy

sobrinoc
09-08-2009, 08:04 PM
Travis,

It's an article concerning gpp where he also talks about four phases in training, accumulative, intensification, transformation, & delayed transformation. He also mentions circa max and peaking. I got confused because I thought those phases were traditionally related to linear and block periodization, not conjugate. He also writes about special exercises and switching them. Anyway, thanks for any clarification, sounded like some interesting stuff but I just couldn't get my arms around it.

vdizenzo
09-08-2009, 08:19 PM
Sounds interesting. Too bad I don't buy that rag mag.

Travis Bell
09-08-2009, 08:30 PM
Oh, I do remember him writing that one. I'll need to take a look at it to be perfectly clear, but I think I can put it most of it halfway clear LOL

You are correct, these terms do normally refer to block periodization, however they can be applied to the conjugate method for an advanced program.

Very simply put, the closer you get to a meet, you cut out all the bull crap. Less stuff like (for squatting) heavy stiff legged pulls, belt squats, plyo sled etc. For benching it'll be less heavy rep out sets, lighter weights on acessory movents (board presses, extensions etc)

The difference is when these phases are applied to block periodiazation it changes the weight of your main movement, in Louie's application it is not applied to the weight that we use for our ME movement (we still always work up to a single) rather it refers more to the spectrum of movements we might choose as well as the intensity.

He and I were actually going over this on Monday and I am pretty sure I remember him saying circa max would be like the transformation and leading into the delayed transformation (our circa max is 3 weeks now, not the old school 5 or 10)

So to reiterate, right now we're not doing a meet until December so we'll do a lot of exercises. Say for tomorrow, we'll do something with the football bar for a ME movement, then some heavy rep sets, then some heavy acessory movements ranging from tricep movements, to shoulder to trap to back and then some GPP work like sled dragging, prowler pushes or the wheelbarrow carries. Lots of stuff that is more peripheral, and not so much specific to the movement.

As we get close to the meet, we begin to narrow down the stuff and cut out things that don't specifically apply to the movement and focus on the main movements. Less GPP stuff as well. Everything gets focused on the main movements.

A book will be put out on it in lots of detail, but I'm not sure on the timeline. It's a very advanced way of thinking that is helpful for high level lifters, but probably over complicated for guys who are still progressing using what they have been using in the past.

It's not that we're doing anything different, this is just a way of explaining in more detail the reasoning behind what we do as we peak towards a meet.

chris mason
09-08-2009, 09:11 PM
Louie was talking to us about this over the weekend Travis. I think you had left. We were outside doing laps with the wheelbarrow.

By the way, it was great seeing you. I'm sorry we didn't get more time to talk.

Brian Hopper
09-08-2009, 09:13 PM
Well said!!!!

NickAus
09-08-2009, 09:16 PM
Yeah thanks Travis, very helpful!

bencher8
09-08-2009, 09:46 PM
If I understand what is being said....isnt this different from what used to be taught at WSB. I mean this way makes perfect sense to me, but I always thought that the special exercises were pushed up...not down as you drew closer to a meet.

I actually like the idea of doing more further out and then focus more as the meet gets closer...course that doesnt really apply a lot to bench only. I might do doubles and triples on certain movements further out and move to singles as the meet gets closer. but bench only is different kind of training than for a full meet..

NickAus
09-08-2009, 11:20 PM
If I understand what is being said....isnt this different from what used to be taught at WSB. I mean this way makes perfect sense to me, but I always thought that the special exercises were pushed up...not down as you drew closer to a meet..

I remember reading the same, saying close to the meet work your bar speed and push your special exersises.

Travis Bell
09-09-2009, 03:41 AM
Yeah this is a little different than what we used to do.

Looking back, it kinda slowly came about. We just started doing things a little more similar to this over time and now this is where we're at

I may have been a little unclear though, special exercises that apply directly towards the lift are increased, while other exercises that don't apply near as directly will be dropped. So it's kinda the same, but I see what you're saying as well as far as it being different LOL.

The application of this process will mean different things for different people. Speaking for the bench, to Louie extension work is directly applied to the bench (don't hit me Paul! lol) but for someone like yourself it'd be raw boards I would guess as well as full range equipped bench.

Either way, it's too early for me to be thinking this hard! haha hope that clears up the article a little bit though

sayagain
09-09-2009, 07:50 AM
This is really interesting. I was just thinking about a very similar concept the other day. I was trying to figure out how you could apply some of the principles of a block periodization model to the conjugate method. It sounds like Louie is already headed down that path. I'd be interested in reading this article if it is anywhere on the net. Maybe he'll post it on his site.

chris mason
09-09-2009, 08:50 AM
This is really interesting. I was just thinking about a very similar concept the other day. I was trying to figure out how you could apply some of the principles of a block periodization model to the conjugate method. It sounds like Louie is already headed down that path. I'd be interested in reading this article if it is anywhere on the net. Maybe he'll post it on his site.

Or you could order from AtLarge and request a free PLUSA... :)

bencher8
09-09-2009, 09:19 AM
gotcha travis..that makes sense. I dont really do a whole lot of work that doesnt directly affect the lift. I usually drop volume on back work, do singles closer to the meet, but I am lazy lol

ext still suck....I am gonna have to talk to Lou in dec about all this ext stuff lol

Lou told me this little nugget at the last meet..."Why use 1100 to bench 900, instead use 900 to bench 1100" I am still trying to wrap my mind around the application of that little yoda nugget to my training lol

vdizenzo
09-09-2009, 09:39 AM
gotcha travis..that makes sense. I dont really do a whole lot of work that doesnt directly affect the lift. I usually drop volume on back work, do singles closer to the meet, but I am lazy lol

ext still suck....I am gonna have to talk to Lou in dec about all this ext stuff lol

Lou told me this little nugget at the last meet..."Why use 1100 to bench 900, instead use 900 to bench 1100" I am still trying to wrap my mind around the application of that little yoda nugget to my training lol

When I first benched 800 in a meet I had never taken it in the gym. Same goes with my first 600 raw. Last cycle I took the 605 even though it was not planned and almost came up with the 620. I'm actually going to have to buy this mag to read the article. It's time to up my pl IQ a bit and do some more reading.

MarcusWild
09-09-2009, 12:07 PM
I can see the approach. For a couple of years now, I've thought of my training in 3 week blocks despite using the Westside template. It makes a lot of sense. I plan out the blocks based on my current weaknesses and how far I am from a meet.

Paul,

That is the idea. Always use a lighter weight to lifter a heavier weight. You recover better from the training.

Polish Hammer
09-09-2009, 12:23 PM
I'm actually going to have to buy this mag to read the article. It's time to up my pl IQ a bit and do some more reading.

No need big Vin,you could just read it in the aisle and put it back.

sayagain
09-09-2009, 12:33 PM
Or you could order from AtLarge and request a free PLUSA... :)

Haha, nice marketing. I was actually getting ready to place an order. I didn't know I could get a free magazine with it.

bencher8
09-09-2009, 01:43 PM
Marcus, I understand that using lighter weight with more speed would help lift a heavier weight. I understand that it would help you recover better, but I also think using heavy ass weight helps condition the CNS to lift those heavy weights as well. That is the problem with the application that I face. What I try to do is use both. I do shorter ROM exercises with heavyh weight to condition the CNS and develop lockout power and also use speed with "lighter" weights in a full ROM(or close to it) using accomodating resistance on those movements....seems to be working for me or it has been so far. Now if I can just put it all together in a meet, so I can quantify my training protocol lol

MarcusWild
09-09-2009, 03:15 PM
I agree CNS development is important. You probably need to be within a certain percent of your max to get the right balance. Although Sam Byrd does a lot of raw squat training, then can throw on gear and handle 250-300 lbs more. He said anything after 600 feels the same on his back. Maybe bench is different in terms of CNS?

I know that my body used to shutdown when it'd perceive a weight as too heavy for me on squat and bench. Now it seems like I can feel the same strain at the top but my body responds and lifts it. I'm honestly not sure what caused the change or why it happened.