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View Full Version : Does protein in bread/pasta/etc. 'count'...???



Judas
09-19-2009, 03:27 AM
No one where i am seems to be able to answer this one conclusively (read: lots ov guessing), but to get more detail in my nutrition plan, i need to know something.

I peruse the bakery section in the store and see that breads/pitas/wraps and the like contain some amount ov protein. I get all excited and start reading labels and see up to 7-8gr protein in a single pita/wrap/slice. There is also protein listed in pastas, and all kinds ov other stuff that isn't the usual sources (meat, dairy, nuts, etc.).

So if i'm eating 40gr ov protein worth ov chicken in a single pita that is said to contain say 5gr protein, do i count it as 40gr at the end ov the day or 45?

I've got three supposedly good nutritionists telling me three different things here (where i live). One says it does not count at all, it is 'incomplete protein'. Another says it does, 5gr protein is 5gr protein, and i could theoretically eat enough whole grain or brown bread in a day to get my 200-300gr ov protein for the day. The third is undecided and says it depends on several different factors, and on what the sources are, and basically i'm hearing 'I have no idea'.

At the moment i just make sure i get my 300gr + a day from 'real' sources like meat, supplements and dairy. And i eat a lot. If i could count it all, i could get away with less total food and not feel too full half the time.

So which is it...???

Daniel Roberts
09-19-2009, 06:54 AM
No one where i am seems to be able to answer this one conclusively (read: lots ov guessing), but to get more detail in my nutrition plan, i need to know something.

I peruse the bakery section in the store and see that breads/pitas/wraps and the like contain some amount ov protein. I get all excited and start reading labels and see up to 7-8gr protein in a single pita/wrap/slice. There is also protein listed in pastas, and all kinds ov other stuff that isn't the usual sources (meat, dairy, nuts, etc.).

So if i'm eating 40gr ov protein worth ov chicken in a single pita that is said to contain say 5gr protein, do i count it as 40gr at the end ov the day or 45?

I've got three supposedly good nutritionists telling me three different things here (where i live). One says it does not count at all, it is 'incomplete protein'. Another says it does, 5gr protein is 5gr protein, and i could theoretically eat enough whole grain or brown bread in a day to get my 200-300gr ov protein for the day. The third is undecided and says it depends on several different factors, and on what the sources are, and basically i'm hearing 'I have no idea'.

At the moment i just make sure i get my 300gr + a day from 'real' sources like meat, supplements and dairy. And i eat a lot. If i could count it all, i could get away with less total food and not feel too full half the time.

So which is it...???

All three are correct to an extent, the protein will be incomplete (lacks specific essential amino acids), but it does count because in the context of a mixed diet (various sources of proteins, mostly complete) the shortfall in any particular amino acid will be made up by the complete proteins or other incomplete proteins with different amino acid profiles.

VikingWarlord
09-19-2009, 08:15 AM
What he said. It becomes more important to pay close attention if you're trying to eat vegan since the options for complete proteins are much more limited. As far as you're concerned, eat it, count it.

Also, "ov"? Seriously?

Judas
09-21-2009, 08:57 AM
What he said. It becomes more important to pay close attention if you're trying to eat vegan since the options for complete proteins are much more limited. As far as you're concerned, eat it, count it.

I cant eat vegan where i live, its illegal. Besides, they dont look like they'd be all that nutritious as a protein source. Maybe vegetarians...

Seriously though, you and Daniel more or less back up what most people figure (whether they know for sure or not). I guess its not a waste ov time hunting down higher protein carb sources to eat with my meat. That also means i've been getting more protein per day than i'd estimated... which is good. Now maybe i can save a bit ov money...


Also, "ov"? Seriously?

Heh heh... yeah... LOOOOOOOONG story...

You're the first guy here to mention it, on any other forum i'da had threats ov violence by now... haha.

Holto
09-21-2009, 11:08 AM
When I was in grade one my dad (a tradesman) decided he was going to help me with my homework. The first sentence started 'Ov'. My mom (a teacher) intervened and that was the last time my dad tried to 'help'.

Judas
09-21-2009, 06:55 PM
When I was in grade one my dad (a tradesman) decided he was going to help me with my homework. The first sentence started 'Ov'. My mom (a teacher) intervened and that was the last time my dad tried to 'help'.

Hah! Maybe he did that on purpose...

jaypaul0001
09-24-2009, 11:44 PM
Hey dude!! thanks for telling this to us. In fact, I was also interested in knowing this, whether all these bakery food contain proteins or not. Good job!!

newfarris
12-31-2009, 06:36 AM
Certainly count the protein. Even for vegans studies have shown that the whole idea of "protein combining" in each individual meal is not necessary, so long as you get a good amino acid profile over a reasonable space of time (day or two).

Skalami
12-31-2009, 06:26 PM
Count it but the proteins from meat are just better, amino acid wise and also theirs studies that show meat protein causes a rise in testosterone where vegetarian based proteins (i wonder if Whey is included in that list) dont: http://www.ergo-log.com/plantprotein.html

also its kind of off subject but the more i think i might want to go vegetarian the more i start hearing on how much pesticides they use on fruits, how apples are the most pesticide soaked fruit their is how some farmers have admitted they wont eat the potatoes they sell, they grow their own separately. Beef has some major (disgusting) problems but its not like being vegan puts you anywhere in the clear. UNLESS you go the organic/farm market route and that is just too much damn effort and money

Judas
01-03-2010, 05:25 AM
Well, seeing as this came back to life...

I've been doing this, counting every bit ov protein i see listed in what i eat. Makes it a LOT easier to meet my daily requirements (350+gr a day is a lot ov meat...). I'm still skeptical though... was at a friend's house having bacon and eggs, and i find this 'Weight Watchers' whole wheat bread. WAY less bad **** in that slice ov bread. Ov course, any ****ing ****** should also notice that the slices are HALF AS BIG... (groan...) and people pay for this ****e... Anyways... two tiny (like almost 1/4" thick) slices ov bread... 4 grams protein. Basically... a slice ov bread... 4grams. I dunno... just kinda hard to believe is all. I mean, we're talking just three ov these whole-wheat slices being the same as one egg....??? Even if its not optimal protein... thats still impressive.

Was in the store a while back and decided to browse the bakery section. I found a single pita with 8gr protein. A single wrap with 9gr. Thats more protein in the BREAD than in the amount ov meat i would have normally used back when i was a normal human being, before i started lifting...

But i see the points being made here. It just adds to the pile, and with all the meat and supplements i ingest in a day i certainly make my amino profiles. On my absolute worst nutrition day i still get at least three meat meals and a bunch ov shakes.

newfarris
01-03-2010, 05:55 AM
As far as breads go, if a store nearby carries it there's a great Organic Bread called Dave's Killer Bread. Especially the varieties that are made of sprouted grains have more protein, like 6g a slice. So a Peanut Butter sandwich with a glass of milk (or soy milk) can give you upwards of 30g protein.
The bread tastes great too :-)

soclydeza
01-03-2010, 08:25 PM
All three are correct to an extent, the protein will be incomplete (lacks specific essential amino acids), but it does count because in the context of a mixed diet (various sources of proteins, mostly complete) the shortfall in any particular amino acid will be made up by the complete proteins or other incomplete proteins with different amino acid profiles.

this is the right idea. protein is made up of amino acids, different protein sources contain different amino acids. you wanna make sure you get all the essential AAs throughout the day:

Arginine
Isoleucine
Histidine
Leucine
Methionine
Lysine
Phenylalanine
Tryptophan
Threonine
Valine

so to answer your question, yes they do count, but dont count on only those sources for your protein, get your different sources in their too.

David Trantham
01-04-2010, 07:26 AM
i don't count protein from pasta,bread,beans,nuts etc. they are what u call incomplete proteins (they don't have all the essential amino acids, where the protein from meats such as chicken ,red meats ,fish etc have all the amino acids,which in return helps build muscle and lean body mass. i would just count the protein from meats, and get about 1 to 1.5 grams per day of your weight example 200lbs bodybuilder approx 200-275 grams of prtein per day.