PDA

View Full Version : Hydrogenated Oils - questions



fixationdarknes
09-19-2009, 05:07 PM
1. Are they equivalent to "trans fat?"

2. What exactly is "unhealthy" about hydrogenated oils? I've googled it a bit, and have been reading that they take up spots on your cell walls or something but end up not doing a good job? I just don't really understand what is meant by that. If anyone can care to explain in a somewhat simple manner I'd appreciate it.

Thanks.

dynamo
09-19-2009, 05:15 PM
they clog the arteries and inflame the blood vessels. They count as transfat but really are generally just saturated fats so they're generally solid at room temperature.

Sasturated fat:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/4/42/Myristic_acid.png/500px-Myristic_acid.png

Unsaturated fat:
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/79/Oleic-acid-skeletal.svg/300px-Oleic-acid-skeletal.svg.png

The saturated fats like to settle in your arteries and pile up giving plaque and thus blockage, and you can see why too, they're flat so they can sit on top of each other while the unsaturated fats are bent so they have a much harder time settling and the unsaturated fats actually aid in clearing plaque build up too.

Skalami
09-20-2009, 02:05 PM
Do transfats help at all with testosterone production, higher intake (compared to no intake at all) help produce more testosterone?

Also anyone notice that after switching to natural peanut butter they dont like the taste of regular old peanut butter? Its like i can taste the partially hydrogenated rape seed oil.

Yamar
09-20-2009, 04:30 PM
Do transfats help at all with testosterone production, higher intake (compared to no intake at all) help produce more testosterone?

Also anyone notice that after switching to natural peanut butter they dont like the taste of regular old peanut butter? Its like i can taste the partially hydrogenated rape seed oil.

Yes. I am a natural PB convert for years now. At one time I was addicted to Jiff and after a year on the natty stuff I tried Jiff and it made me blow chunks.

dynamo
09-20-2009, 05:04 PM
Do transfats help at all with testosterone production, higher intake (compared to no intake at all) help produce more testosterone?

Also anyone notice that after switching to natural peanut butter they dont like the taste of regular old peanut butter? Its like i can taste the partially hydrogenated rape seed oil.

I'm just making an educated guess as I have not done any research on it but I would suspect transfats have absolutely nothing to do with steroid structure (4 carbon rings connected) hormone production. Cholesterol has an impact though. And yes I would rather bludgeon my face off with a screw driver than eat jif (or any like) peanut butter. I actually get pissed off by the horrible 'choosy moms choose jif' commercial since jif tastes like ass and acts like ass too.

fixationdarknes
09-22-2009, 01:24 AM
Hm, what's the deal with monounsaturated/polyunsaturated fats and stuff? Are those the ones that are considered beneficial? I have never really know exactly which type of fat is the one that is considered "healthy." Any insight on that? Thanks.

sharkall2003
09-22-2009, 12:20 PM
Hm, what's the deal with monounsaturated/polyunsaturated fats and stuff? Are those the ones that are considered beneficial? I have never really know exactly which type of fat is the one that is considered "healthy." Any insight on that? Thanks.

Monounsaturated fat is supposed to be heart healthy. Polyunsaturated fats are sorted into two types: Omega 3's and 6's. Omega 3's are fish fats, generally, and are great for cardiovascular health. Omega 6's are good, but not as good. It has been said that an overabundance of Omega 6 fats causes inflammation.

fixationdarknes
09-22-2009, 04:36 PM
So generally we most of our fat consumption to be monounsaturated and omega 3? What about saturated? Thanks by the way.

BigCorey75
09-22-2009, 04:41 PM
Saturated, poly and monounsaturated fats all have health benefits.


Hydrogenated oils are nothing but another name for Trans fats and should be eliminated out of the diet because they are processed man made fats and the body does not handle the digestion process among many other things already said here

sharkall2003
09-23-2009, 08:59 AM
So generally we most of our fat consumption to be monounsaturated and omega 3? What about saturated? Thanks by the way.

Don't worry about saturated fat. You'll get in enough even if you're eating healthy fats. For example: fish oil, olive oil, peanut butter and eggs all have saturated fat. They all have good fats. The fats that you want the most of are olive oil and fish oil.

If you want enough mono's and omega 3's just do this: make sure you have two tablespoons of olive oil throughout the day and 10 grams of fish oil. After that make sure you're macros are in check and you'll be just fine.

Edit: Also make sure you're not eating any processed foods. The saturated fats in processed foods is not as good.

Also, if you can afford it have RAW Coconut Oil. It's an excellent source of Saturated fat, and I wouldn't even worry about these saturated fats. About 12-13 grams of saturated per serving.

http://www.tmuscle.com/free_online_article/sports_body_training_performance_nutrition/8_more_power_foods This is an article that discusses some of the stuff with coconut oil

fixationdarknes
09-26-2009, 05:00 AM
Interesting. Thank you guys. Also, this may seem like a really silly/obvious question, but what kinds of foods contain the fats (trans fats) that we are to avoid? Like I don't have nutrition facts for everything I eat, so I am always curious.

Thanks again.

dynamo
09-26-2009, 06:11 AM
stuff like peanut butter, of course if you eat natural peanut butter you'll see how it separates and thats good because in industry they take out those unsaturated fats and put in saturated ones to keep it solid at room temp, which is bad. Easy way to tell is if its solid at room temperature its most likely full of saturated fats. Things like butter, or the fat off your steak, of course you should use some common sense, for instance, jello, when prepared properly is a solid at room temperature, but contains no fat.

fixationdarknes
09-26-2009, 04:04 PM
Hm... butter? Well I do eat natural peanut butter, I actually very much prefer the taste anyway :p Thanks again for the responses everyone.