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View Full Version : Starting Westside...tips?



Polish Hammer
10-01-2009, 10:22 AM
Ive finally decided to follow the Westside template for awhile. While Ive incorporated some techniques, read alot of Louies articles, and have quite a few friends who have been successful with it, ive never really given it a go. I plan on following the basic or "standard" template and going from there. I know alot of you guys train with it so I was wondering if there was any advice or tips you could give me with getting started. Thanks.

Clifford Gillmore
10-01-2009, 10:32 AM
Deadlift every week.

I THINK I follow a westside/conjugated periodization template, but what I do will more than likely never be what Louie is doing at Westside. For the longest time I spent reading about how to train with the template, how to do things, listened to the internet 'experts' - I should of just been SFW.

You should really have Travis chime in on this, as he is the ONLY person who can kind of say what exactly is going on at westside today.

barbell01
10-01-2009, 10:55 AM
use different movements to set PR's with.

MarcusWild
10-01-2009, 11:33 AM
Here's a list off the top of my head:

1. Don't do an brand new exercise for a ME movement. Use it 2-3 times as an accessory before you add it to your ME rotation.

2. After your ME exercise, pick a second barbell movement and do sets of 3-5 reps. This let's you get 2 of 3 from the squat, deadlift, and good morning exercises each workout. On days you feel good, try to beat your 3 or 5 rep PR. On days you feel beat up, just get in 3x3 or 3x5 with the same weight. These are what build strength.

3. We rarely max on GMs. I don't think Westside does anymore either. They are more of an accessory.

4. Don't get hung up on percentages for DE work. Make sure the bar moves fast and change your accommodation every 2-3 weeks. You can rotate different bands, chains, bands and chains, reverse bands, etc.

5. Most people don't do 10-12 sets with the same weight on DE work anymore. They do 6-8 sets then work up a little bit, but keep it below ~90%. You need to do this based on feel. A lot is determined by how recovered you are from ME day, and what your next ME day is.

6. Don't forget that DE work is a great time to focus on building your technique. Also, keep the rest periods short to improve your GPP.

7. I've never seen anyone that had too strong of lats, triceps, lower back, or hamstrings. Just assume they are weak and plan your accessories accordingly.

8. Deadlift but rarely do a competition style deadlift. If you look at the best deadlifters like Konstantin, he deadlifts weekly. How often does he ever do a competitive deadlift in training though? He deads off blocks, deficit deads, SLDL, against bands, with chains, etc. He tends to do reps too vs singles. This is where that second barbell movement on ME day comes in.

9. GPP work matters. Sometimes you end up with 5 people in your deadlift flight because people bomb, get hurt, etc. It also helps your recovery.

Polish Hammer
10-01-2009, 12:49 PM
Here's a list off the top of my head:

1. Don't do an brand new exercise for a ME movement. Use it 2-3 times as an accessory before you add it to your ME rotation.

2. After your ME exercise, pick a second barbell movement and do sets of 3-5 reps. This let's you get 2 of 3 from the squat, deadlift, and good morning exercises each workout. On days you feel good, try to beat your 3 or 5 rep PR. On days you feel beat up, just get in 3x3 or 3x5 with the same weight. These are what build strength.

3. We rarely max on GMs. I don't think Westside does anymore either. They are more of an accessory.

4. Don't get hung up on percentages for DE work. Make sure the bar moves fast and change your accommodation every 2-3 weeks. You can rotate different bands, chains, bands and chains, reverse bands, etc.

5. Most people don't do 10-12 sets with the same weight on DE work anymore. They do 6-8 sets then work up a little bit, but keep it below ~90%. You need to do this based on feel. A lot is determined by how recovered you are from ME day, and what your next ME day is.

6. Don't forget that DE work is a great time to focus on building your technique. Also, keep the rest periods short to improve your GPP.

7. I've never seen anyone that had too strong of lats, triceps, lower back, or hamstrings. Just assume they are weak and plan your accessories accordingly.

8. Deadlift but rarely do a competition style deadlift. If you look at the best deadlifters like Konstantin, he deadlifts weekly. How often does he ever do a competitive deadlift in training though? He deads off blocks, deficit deads, SLDL, against bands, with chains, etc. He tends to do reps too vs singles. This is where that second barbell movement on ME day comes in.

9. GPP work matters. Sometimes you end up with 5 people in your deadlift flight because people bomb, get hurt, etc. It also helps your recovery.





Awesome bro. Thanx

C-Sobrino
10-01-2009, 02:12 PM
Pick a set of 4-6 ME movements for the bench and 2-3 box squat ME movements and 2-3 deadlift ME movements for lower body and rotate them during a 12-16 week cycle. That way you can find out which movements build your strength and which are just for fun and testing.

While I agree with Marcus about not getting hung up on % for your DE movements, yet I found out something that may be of help to a certain kind of person. I'll explain: I started training for powerlifting recently while I was still a law student so I didn't too much free time. I will have even less time to train when I start working as a corporate lawyer in two weeks. I also do not respond well to instinctive training. If I don't have a plan for each day I tend to get lost. So I made up the following guidelines to guide my training, save some time, and learn to either push when I feel crappy or rest even when I feel good:

1) Never calculate DE %'s but at the same time never ever go beyond 60% (This is the only # I calculate at the beginning of a cycle).
2) Plan out exactly which RE movements I'm going to do and maybe some alternatives.
3) Plan out your ME %. Since I keep a log of my ME movements I know my goals for that day so my ME workout looks like this: Warmup reps, 70%x1, 80%x1, 90%x1, 95%x1, (make a 2#-5# PR)x1

Again, this has worked for me and I think it's a good idea for someone who doesn't have much time. I'm sure some people think it's a great idea and others think I'm totally off. This will happen no matter what so do what work's best for you man and good luck.

NickAus
10-01-2009, 04:28 PM
Marcus hit some really good points, I would add keep the focus on squat/bench/deadlift numbers because in the end they are what matters.
The special exercises are tools to build the big 3 (and they do).
My training partner was getting carried away with pushing up the band box squats etc and increased all his variations of band box squats by around 60lbs but did not practice free squats much and his squat only went up about 5-10 lbs.
I'm sure he could have added more to his actual squat be practicing them a little more and working his weaknesses rather than copying the W.S video's.
Make sure you practice like you play ie full gear sometimes if you use it.
Hope this helps.

joey54
10-01-2009, 06:28 PM
How many people are in your group?

Lones Green
10-01-2009, 06:39 PM
Here's a list off the top of my head:

1. Don't do an brand new exercise for a ME movement. Use it 2-3 times as an accessory before you add it to your ME rotation.

2. After your ME exercise, pick a second barbell movement and do sets of 3-5 reps. This let's you get 2 of 3 from the squat, deadlift, and good morning exercises each workout. On days you feel good, try to beat your 3 or 5 rep PR. On days you feel beat up, just get in 3x3 or 3x5 with the same weight. These are what build strength.

3. We rarely max on GMs. I don't think Westside does anymore either. They are more of an accessory.

4. Don't get hung up on percentages for DE work. Make sure the bar moves fast and change your accommodation every 2-3 weeks. You can rotate different bands, chains, bands and chains, reverse bands, etc.

5. Most people don't do 10-12 sets with the same weight on DE work anymore. They do 6-8 sets then work up a little bit, but keep it below ~90%. You need to do this based on feel. A lot is determined by how recovered you are from ME day, and what your next ME day is.

6. Don't forget that DE work is a great time to focus on building your technique. Also, keep the rest periods short to improve your GPP.

7. I've never seen anyone that had too strong of lats, triceps, lower back, or hamstrings. Just assume they are weak and plan your accessories accordingly.

8. Deadlift but rarely do a competition style deadlift. If you look at the best deadlifters like Konstantin, he deadlifts weekly. How often does he ever do a competitive deadlift in training though? He deads off blocks, deficit deads, SLDL, against bands, with chains, etc. He tends to do reps too vs singles. This is where that second barbell movement on ME day comes in.

9. GPP work matters. Sometimes you end up with 5 people in your deadlift flight because people bomb, get hurt, etc. It also helps your recovery.

Good advice!!!

You'll see some great results with the standard Westside template. Don't worry about getting too fancy with it for now.

Hazerboy
10-01-2009, 10:26 PM
The special exercises are tools to build the big 3 (and they do).
My training partner was getting carried away with pushing up the band box squats etc and increased all his variations of band box squats by around 60lbs but did not practice free squats much and his squat only went up about 5-10 lbs.

This is very true. Picking good ME excercises is key- after a few cycles I think I've figured out that GMings and high bar squats do very little little for my competition squat.

Polish Hammer
10-02-2009, 04:28 AM
Really good stuff guys. I appreciate it. Starting on Monday and am really excited.