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WVBob
11-06-2009, 07:27 AM
Anyone out there have any experience in powerlifting with diabetes? How does it affect your progress?

Jason198
11-06-2009, 07:34 AM
I think you are doing great Bob you handle it well, sounds like youare on your way back up by reading your log.

mr handy
11-06-2009, 08:24 AM
Not sure it will help but there is a pro domestic cycling team called "team type 1" that has several diabetics. As I recall one of the diabetic riders was very strong and was going to be picked up by one of the top teams, he was slated to ride in the Tour De France. All this is off the top of my head so I dont know if I am 100% accurate. I saw a story or something about him on VS. I don't remember his name.

Here is a Velonews article with a bit about the team... http://www.velonews.com/article/99642
If a diabetic can be a pro cyclist then he can do anything. They basically live on their bikes.

Hazerboy
11-06-2009, 04:53 PM
If a diabetic can be a pro cyclist then he can do anything. They basically live on their bikes.

That guy has to have an insulin pump. Aren't some days on the tour like 6 hours of racing or more?

Bohizzle
11-06-2009, 05:49 PM
I'm not a powerlifter, but I've got type 1 (have had it for 20yrs). I haven't found Diabetes to limit my training unless my blood sugars are too high or too low around my workout. But if your control is good, there shouldn't be any reason why it should impact your progress.

Hope that helps.

mr handy
11-06-2009, 06:10 PM
That guy has to have an insulin pump. Aren't some days on the tour like 6 hours of racing or more?

Don't think he had, or any of the riders on the team have insulin pumps...
there were a few days in this last tour that were over 200 kilometers. 6 hours sounds about average for a day in the Tour. 200k is a bit over 120 miles for those who dont know. I know in 07 the longest stage was 236.5k

JK1
11-06-2009, 06:10 PM
I have had type I diabetes for 24 years this January. I am also a powerlifter... No one (other than my wife) calls me weak by any means.... ;-)

Keep your diabetes in tight control and you will not see any problems with what you can do in the gym or your powerlifting progress. The only limitations that you will have are those that you set for yourself.

Meets can be a bit tricky, because you have to keep really tight reign on your blood glucose levels, so work closely with your endocrinologist/doctor on that one. I've found that if I have a hypoglycemic episode at any point within 24-36 hours of the meet it will take away from my absolute maxes. I've also found out that I can have some funky blood glucose swings during a meet because of excitement, changes in diet, etc. I will check my blood sugar before and after each attempt and in some cases every 20-35 minutes. I've worked out a system with my endocrinologist for grams of simple carbs to take depending on what my blood glucose levels are and when to take them. This will vary from person to person, so its something to pay attention too.

If there is any way I can help you out, let me know. Diabetes is NOT a limiting condition with powerlifting unless you allow it to be.

JK1
11-06-2009, 06:12 PM
That guy has to have an insulin pump. Aren't some days on the tour like 6 hours of racing or more?

that doesn't mean anything. The newest pumps are totally programable based on an individuals response to carbohydrates ingested and activity levels.

Hazerboy
11-06-2009, 06:30 PM
lol I'm not sure what you thought I meant, but I was basically getting at the fact that it would be pretty difficult to take some insulin shots during a race...

Thats pretty sick though that you've got your diabetes so dialed in, especially around meet time. What does your doctor think about you powerlifting? And how does weight gain/loss effect you (especially quickly dropping water weight)?

JK1
11-06-2009, 06:50 PM
lol I'm not sure what you thought I meant, but I was basically getting at the fact that it would be pretty difficult to take some insulin shots during a race...

Thats pretty sick though that you've got your diabetes so dialed in, especially around meet time. What does your doctor think about you powerlifting? And how does weight gain/loss effect you (especially quickly dropping water weight)?

LOL. Ok, I completely misunderstood what you were trying to write. I apologize for that...


My doctor tells me I'm fat... he also tells me that as long as my physiological parameters are within normal limits then he isn't going to do anything to change it.

As far as weight loss/gain, I do think drastic cutting measures that are done by powerlifters are a no-no for someone who is a powerlifter who has diabetes. In a nutshell, drammatic dehydration, even for a short period of time can alter bloodflow to the kidneys. This altered blood flow can lead to problems, including acute renal failure, in a mammal with preexisting kidney disease. To cut 3 or 4 lbs isn't a big deal if you are over 240 lbs, but to drop 5-8% of your bodymass is.

For me personally, I'm a SHW. I don't care. I basically wake up, take a big dump, and go weigh in. Honestly, I like it that way. Its less stressful.

I will increase water intake and limit sodium the week before a meet though. i don't see there to be a reason to go into a meet holding extra fluid either.

JK1
11-06-2009, 06:51 PM
Oh, and I get the distinct impression that both my GP and my endocrinologist think its cool I'm a powerlifter and a diabetic. Also don't forget, I'm really picky with which physician I allow to touch me.

KarstenDD
11-06-2009, 09:40 PM
Insulin is wicked anabolic.

WVBob
11-07-2009, 01:50 PM
Wow I generated some god discussion here. Good.

I am type 2 and still just taking insulin. But I am probably going to have to go on itwithin a year. I can't seem to get my numbers back down to where they need to be unless I starve myself. And that doesn't bode well with powerlifting.

I'm 50 years old and I only benchpress due to a disc being removed from my back several years ago. But Ihave a long term goal of getting a bench of 500 raw. Right now, I am at about 280 after being off with a shoulder a year ago.

I am just concerned about fluxuations from eating a lot of protein.

WVBob
11-07-2009, 01:51 PM
KarstenDD, what do yu mean insulin is a great anabolic? How?

JK1
11-07-2009, 05:20 PM
Wow I generated some god discussion here. Good.

I am type 2 and still just taking insulin. But I am probably going to have to go on itwithin a year. I can't seem to get my numbers back down to where they need to be unless I starve myself. And that doesn't bode well with powerlifting.

I'm 50 years old and I only benchpress due to a disc being removed from my back several years ago. But Ihave a long term goal of getting a bench of 500 raw. Right now, I am at about 280 after being off with a shoulder a year ago.

I am just concerned about fluxuations from eating a lot of protein.


Protein shouldn't cause drammatic blood glucose fluctuations, even in a type II. Its the carbohydrates you are taking in that is causing problems. You need to get your diet tight and keep it that way if you are fluctuating up and down quite a bit. Have you had a "male" hormone profile done? At your age, checking for hypogonadism and hypothyroidism (the bit trio) isn't a bad idea at all. Low testosterone levels will induce insulin resistance.


As far as the insulin is anabolic comment.... it is. The thing is its nondescriminant, it will cause an increase in bodyfat as well as facilitate muscle uptake of aminoacids and glucose. High bodyfat will lead to insulin resistance.... its a brutal cycle. There is a bunch of bull**** on the internet about insulin as a performance enhancing drug. I've got my own soap boxes where I've been harping on that on other forums for years now. The thing is insulin is a hormone in the body with tight control of counterregulatory hormones too. This means the body tries to keep your blood glucose in a certian range to fuel the brain. The body will protect the brain at all costs. There are several professional bodybuilders taking a 'stack" of GH and insulin combined. Personally, I think they are inducing type II diabetes with the insulin counterregulatory effects of GH and as a result are actually taking the insulin as a supplement to counteract the effects of the insulin resistance they have caused in themselves. Thats a whole different topic that doesn't belong on this part of the forum. I also think you are ****house rat crazy for taking insulin in an unregulated manner becuase hypoglycemia can and will cause permenant brain damage or death. I've seen the effects first hand.

Judas
11-08-2009, 04:48 AM
Insulin is wicked anabolic.

Heh heh... and there is more than one powerlifter out there taking well advantage ov that fact. Its one ov those WADA grey-areas. Dangerous game though, if you go that route.

WVBob
11-08-2009, 10:36 AM
Protein shouldn't cause drammatic blood glucose fluctuations, even in a type II. Its the carbohydrates you are taking in that is causing problems. You need to get your diet tight and keep it that way if you are fluctuating up and down quite a bit. Have you had a "male" hormone profile done? At your age, checking for hypogonadism and hypothyroidism (the bit trio) isn't a bad idea at all. Low testosterone levels will induce insulin resistance.

The only testing that I've had done is testosterone. And beleive it or not, as a 50 year old man, my TST level is above normal. So my doctor would not give me supplements for that. I know that I need to reduce the amount of fat that I take in and I can do that and not lose strength. My Body fat is at 22%. If I can drop that down into the mid teens, that may help my blood glucose levels.

I just want to lift!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

JK1
11-08-2009, 11:04 AM
The only testing that I've had done is testosterone. And beleive it or not, as a 50 year old man, my TST level is above normal. So my doctor would not give me supplements for that. I know that I need to reduce the amount of fat that I take in and I can do that and not lose strength. My Body fat is at 22%. If I can drop that down into the mid teens, that may help my blood glucose levels.

I just want to lift!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Good. Get into the gym, get under a bar, and do it. The only limitations that you have are those that you set for yourself. Train hard... show us what you can do.