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View Full Version : Tire Flipping, some questions on it



CainMcCloud
11-08-2009, 05:36 PM
So, I have found I love tire flipping, it pushes me, but here are some questions I have about it:

1. How do you get a tire to weigh enough? I am using our chevy's tires (dad guessed it weighs like 60-100lbs, I'd say like 90) and it isn't very hard for me to flip, except on longer distances, which I have been doing to actually push myself, and I just got done and my thighs are on fire, but I am wanting to go up in weightage, and my uncle told me you could fill one with cement, is this what some of you do? I am also looking into getting a tractor tire (we have a tractor but them tires are in use hehe) and a few more big tires to fill up with.

2. How long should the distance be should I be focusing on? I am wanting to burn fat and gain muscle, so I am thinking maybe 50 yards, back-forth 3-5x?

3. Will this be effective at all for fat loss? Burning calories I guess is better word.

Sorry if any/all of these sound dumb.

DieselWarrior
11-08-2009, 05:56 PM
aUsOaIzR1iY
Try to find a loader tire, mine is right at 200lbs, gives a GREAT (beginner) workout! Ive got a tire off a tractor trailer, but a wider version, its only 150lbs and its toooo light to get a gooood workout off of.

I got all my tires for FREE, just start calling around and ask.

GL,
Andrew

ZenMonkey
11-08-2009, 06:09 PM
Call around... people WANT to give them away. I got a 700lb and 350lb tire delivered to my house for free. Ive heard that you should be able to flip a tire that is double your DL weight. I had a 475lb DL and could flip the 700lb tire a good 15 times so that equation isnt too bad.

With a tire that light Id probably drag it instead of flip.

Off Road
11-08-2009, 06:36 PM
With a tire that light Id probably drag it instead of flip.
I like that suggestion. I love my tire sled and it's easy to add more weight to it.

CainMcCloud
11-08-2009, 07:05 PM
So, how many times (flipping reps) should I be aiming for in a tire? Can I do a low-weight tire at first, and do long distances for conditioning and calorie burning instead of heavier weight with lower reps?

Would Tire-Flipping be like weight lifting in essence that the heavier with lower reps is building muscle more while lower weight higher rep is conditioning more?

Tom Mutaffis
11-09-2009, 07:26 AM
So, I have found I love tire flipping, it pushes me, but here are some questions I have about it:

1. How do you get a tire to weigh enough? I am using our chevy's tires (dad guessed it weighs like 60-100lbs, I'd say like 90) and it isn't very hard for me to flip, except on longer distances, which I have been doing to actually push myself, and I just got done and my thighs are on fire, but I am wanting to go up in weightage, and my uncle told me you could fill one with cement, is this what some of you do? I am also looking into getting a tractor tire (we have a tractor but them tires are in use hehe) and a few more big tires to fill up with.

2. How long should the distance be should I be focusing on? I am wanting to burn fat and gain muscle, so I am thinking maybe 50 yards, back-forth 3-5x?

3. Will this be effective at all for fat loss? Burning calories I guess is better word.

Sorry if any/all of these sound dumb.

As others have mentioned you should be able to get tires for free. They are expensive to recycle so once a tire is damaged and no longer functional than construction companies would be happy to give them to you.

Flipping a tire for 50 yard (150 feet) is way too far.

There are four different ways to effectively train tire flips...
- Max flips in a given period of time (30-60 seconds)
- Flip the tire a specified distance for speed (50-80 feet)
- Tire flip for a designated number of reps (5-15), can be one-motion reps. Time under tension should not go over 90 seconds.
- Heavy tire flip (low rep).

It is very easy to tear your biceps if you do not have good technique or if you overtrain the tire. To cover 150 feet you would have to flip most tires 20+ times, and multiple sets would do more damage to your body than good.

In the past I have flipped a tire for over 100 feet but it was max flips in a minute (hit 20 flips), and that was my only working set for the day. It was also with a relatively light tire.

For your goals of burning fat and gaining muscle I would do interval training with the tire. Do something like 5 flips then rest for 1-2 minutes and then perform another 5 flips and rest for 1-2 minutes, repeating until you reach 5-7 total sets. You want to use a heavy enough tire that it is challenging but you want to be able to flip the tire in one-motion and not have to resort to poor technique. Not knowing your strength levels I would say at least a 250 lbs tire would be needed to accomplish anything.


Call around... people WANT to give them away. I got a 700lb and 350lb tire delivered to my house for free. Ive heard that you should be able to flip a tire that is double your DL weight. I had a 475lb DL and could flip the 700lb tire a good 15 times so that equation isnt too bad.

With a tire that light Id probably drag it instead of flip.

Exactly. Tire drag can be a great way to build GPP/conditioning.

The double deadlift rule of thumb for tire is a good one. Tire flip is also much easier for taller individuals with long levers, simply because they have better leverage on the event.

I have attached a picture of a tire sled.


So, how many times (flipping reps) should I be aiming for in a tire? Can I do a low-weight tire at first, and do long distances for conditioning and calorie burning instead of heavier weight with lower reps?

Would Tire-Flipping be like weight lifting in essence that the heavier with lower reps is building muscle more while lower weight higher rep is conditioning more?

Yes, a lighter tire for low reps would be like lifting with very light weights on a total body movement (like a clean and press).

In terms of what would be beneficial; you could use a light tire in place of cardiovascular training although you would burn more fat with low intensity cardio. Interval training might be a good solution, or simply picking up a heavier tire or weighting your current tire for GPP work.

You can add chains to the inside of a tire to make it heavier, or put smaller tires inside of a large tire.

Hope this helps. Let me know if you have questions and I do have quite a few tire flip videos on Youtube if you are curious about technique.

fpr
11-09-2009, 04:25 PM
I asked around about a tractor tire and one of the mechanics told me that they probably wouldn't be too easy to find because they retread the tires.

CainMcCloud
11-09-2009, 06:12 PM
Well, I am probably gonna try to find me a good 250lb tire, and maybe one that weighs 300, and 200. I am wanting to start off at a low weight, to help get my technique correct on it before I go to anything severely challenging cause I mean, like you said, tearing something is the last thing I want to do lol.

Tom Mutaffis
11-10-2009, 07:27 AM
I asked around about a tractor tire and one of the mechanics told me that they probably wouldn't be too easy to find because they retread the tires.

A mechanic would not be the best resource unless he works on heavy equipment.

I would reach out to local construction companies or junk yards to see if they have any large tires laying around.

skinny99
11-10-2009, 08:31 AM
Local tractor places,heavy equipment shops and commercial truck shops would be good places to look! They will give there tires away!