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muscle_g
12-18-2009, 05:33 PM
I was wondering what do you big benchers do for wrist strength on bench?

I have noticed when I get into my heavy weights my left wrist will sort of bend back and it sometimes throws me off. When I put my wrist wraps on it corrects this, but when I do my raw work I dont want to totally rely on them all of the time. Also when I wrap I really have to make sure my left wrist is wrapped tight so this doesn't happen, during my shirted work.

Right now I will pick out 1 or 2 exercises on my Accessory day
Reverse DB Wrist Curls(1 armed and 2 armed)
Behind the Back BB Wrist Curls
DB Wrist Curls(1 armed and 2 armed)
Wrist Roller
Hand Grippers

muscle_g
12-19-2009, 06:14 AM
No one can help me out? Are these good exercises that I'm currently doing for wrist strength on the bench? Is there something else I should be doing?

Lones Green
12-19-2009, 07:19 AM
Your wrists bending back is called "handcuffing," it's a pretty common problem. Some direct forearm and wrist work will help, but the biggest thing that should help you is thinking (and verbal cues) to keep your wrists straight. Also, wrap your wrists SUPER tight and come way up high on the hand.

If nothing else, you'll gain some forearm size out of those movements.

I know Rob Luyando does some direct forearm/wrist work, he's mentioned it on here before.

Hazerboy
12-19-2009, 02:13 PM
Reverse DB Wrist Curls(1 armed and 2 armed)
Behind the Back BB Wrist Curls
DB Wrist Curls(1 armed and 2 armed)



do all of these movements only do them with a thickbar. If you don't have a thickbar wrap a towel around the bar. Thickbar pressing movements I like a lot also - thickbar bench, floor press, etc. Honestly just thickbar curls will probably toast your wrists. Sledge hammer levering is real good too though not sure if they will develop the strength you want.

SEOINAGE
12-19-2009, 02:28 PM
I was thinking the same thing, and after my ME bench today having my right wrist bend back on me and give me a bit of discomfort i figured I better fix this weakness. So I hope more people give you advice muscle_g because I could use it too. Will try the towel wrapped bar thing too.

bulldogs702
12-19-2009, 04:29 PM
Wrist curls are king for forearm strength I prefer using a pre set barbell instead of a dumbbell most gyms go up to at least 120 the are much shorter than Olympic bar but will give you a much better workout than dumbbells. Just use a preacher or regular bench and lean forward and make sure your arm is pointed down slightly you don't want to be at a 90 degree angle. It takes a little balancing but you will light those forearms up.

endymion88
12-19-2009, 04:34 PM
+1 to sledge levering

h.t.hall
12-19-2009, 04:58 PM
Wait a minute...what's wrong with the hand moving back during benching ? I always benched like that on purpose and i think it helps lessen the distance the bar travels,helps keep the elbows in and provides much more stability to the lift when you don't have to balance the bar all the time.It just goes back and locks into place.

NickAus
12-19-2009, 06:09 PM
Keep elbows under the bar and push with elbows not hands if that makes sense.

Lones Green
12-19-2009, 10:03 PM
Wait a minute...what's wrong with the hand moving back during benching ? I always benched like that on purpose and i think it helps lessen the distance the bar travels,helps keep the elbows in and provides much more stability to the lift when you don't have to balance the bar all the time.It just goes back and locks into place.

A broken arm is what's wrong with it.

Plus you'll have much much less pressing power. Bend your wrist back like when you handcuff it. All your power is not being used effectively. You want your elbows and wrists in line with the bar for maximum weight moved.

It will really handicap you in more ways than one

h.t.hall
12-19-2009, 10:26 PM
But when the wrist is back the bar is moved more toward the shoulder thus it's like the upper arm bone is shorter (better leverage).
I guess it's how one learns how to do things from the start...it's not an unnatural movement though nor will it result in breaking an arm.
The wrist is made to withstand such positions,when you do pushups or push anything with the fist open the wrist is back.

Fuzzy
12-19-2009, 11:20 PM
But when the wrist is back the bar is moved more toward the shoulder thus it's like the upper arm bone is shorter (better leverage).
I guess it's how one learns how to do things from the start...it's not an unnatural movement though nor will it result in breaking an arm.
The wrist is made to withstand such positions,when you do pushups or push anything with the fist open the wrist is back.

Yeah, for your average gym rat who aspires to one day press 255 infront of his girlfriend. You forget however that most of the people here have much much bigger aspirations than a 255 bench. The rules therefore change when you are dealing with loads that can easily break a bone if not treated with the respect. Things suchs as 'whats natural' has little consequence if it involves blowing an injury.

255 isnt going to hurt anyone, but 500, 600? These are weights that can hurt you.

Sensei
12-19-2009, 11:33 PM
wrist roller, leverage bar, "twist yo' wrist" (a wrist roller for radial/ulnar extension)

SEOINAGE
12-19-2009, 11:40 PM
Yeah, for your average gym rat who aspires to one day press 255 infront of his girlfriend. You forget however that most of the people here have much much bigger aspirations than a 255 bench. The rules therefore change when you are dealing with loads that can easily break a bone if not treated with the respect. Things suchs as 'whats natural' has little consequence if it involves blowing an injury.

255 isnt going to hurt anyone, but 500, 600? These are weights that can hurt you.

That is part of why my wrist strength isn't up to par because I was in the habit of letting my wrists cock back. But all the logic behind keeping htem in line with your elbows and being straight for power delivery makes sense, and I have been trying to keep them where they need to be every since I learned that was neccesary. hthall get in the habit of doing it properly and you will be better off.

h.t.hall
12-19-2009, 11:40 PM
If a movement is natural,it's natural regardless of the weight used.
It depends on the person,some people find behind the neck presses very unnatural for example,or wide sumo squats and deadlifts very unnatural to them,but others manage to handle unbelievable poundages without problems or even world records.
I don't mean to be the wise guy here ,perhaps it's a technique point i never paid much attention to,i'll in fact try it next workout otherwise.
It just feels natural to me to just lock the wrist back and concentrate on everything else and leave the wrist strength and balancing out of the picture...

SEOINAGE
12-19-2009, 11:43 PM
If a movement is natural,it's natural regardless of the weight used.
It depends on the person,some people find behind the neck presses very unnatural for example,or wide sumo squats and deadlifts very unnatural to them,but others manage to handle unbelievable poundages without problems or even world records.
I don't mean to be the wise guy here ,perhaps it's a technique point i never paid much attention to,i'll in fact try it next workout otherwise.
It just feels natural to me to just lock the wrist back and concentrate on everything else and leave the wrist strength and balancing out of the picture...

people manage huge poundages with sumo deadlifts because of gear, it helps tremendously with your hips and groin to be able to handle that wide stance.

Fuzzy
12-20-2009, 01:22 AM
If a movement is natural,it's natural regardless of the weight used.
It depends on the person,some people find behind the neck presses very unnatural for example,or wide sumo squats and deadlifts very unnatural to them,but others manage to handle unbelievable poundages without problems or even world records.
I don't mean to be the wise guy here ,perhaps it's a technique point i never paid much attention to,i'll in fact try it next workout otherwise.
It just feels natural to me to just lock the wrist back and concentrate on everything else and leave the wrist strength and balancing out of the picture...

Yes... a movement is natural to a certain point. But we are talking about going much much beyond those points. Benching in a shirt is not natural, you are handling weights that are above natural and as such you must take this into account. The same applies to every movement.

My wrists naturally want to cock back when I have 340+ pounds locked overhead, but if I let them do that I risk aggrivating my chronic wrist injury and not being able to hold more than 40 pounds for a month.

Some of us are not dealing with natural weights. Therefore the usual rules of what is antural does not apply.

IronDiggy
12-20-2009, 01:32 AM
I have this problem with my left wrist as well... My problem seems to have something to do with my short little arms cause I can handle close grip without an issue but once I get my hands on those rings the wrist just hurts.

n00bster
12-20-2009, 03:07 AM
Wait a minute...what's wrong with the hand moving back during benching ? I always benched like that on purpose and i think it helps lessen the distance the bar travels,helps keep the elbows in and provides much more stability to the lift when you don't have to balance the bar all the time.It just goes back and locks into place.

Like the position on the left below?

http://img20.imageshack.us/img20/6510/61610131.jpg

Rob Luyando
12-20-2009, 09:27 AM
Your wrist should be kept straight and solid. Bending the wrists with any sick amount of weight puts a lot of stress on the forearms and I think the majority of the arm breaks are due to not keepin the wrist straight.

Dumbell Wrist curls
Barbelll wrist curls
Wrist Rope
And tons of forearm work

All are a must!

IronDiggy
12-20-2009, 10:30 AM
Like the position on the left below?

http://img20.imageshack.us/img20/6510/61610131.jpg

thats kinda what mine does... but it looks bent inward as well.

Travis Bell
12-20-2009, 12:18 PM
thats kinda what mine does... but it looks bent inward as well.

That is really bad.

You need to keep your wrist straight while benching.

Even if you don't break your arm (which contrary to the expert advise here, has indeed happened without gear) you can still get some severe soft tissue issues as a result of benching like that.

dynamo
12-20-2009, 12:29 PM
That is really bad.

You need to keep your wrist straight while benching.

Even if you don't break your arm (which contrary to the expert advise here, has indeed happened without gear) you can still get some severe soft tissue issues as a result of benching like that.

yeah I was putting up 335 a month or two ago, no gear and my left wrist ended up cocking somewhere during the rep, didn't break any bones, just wrecked all the muscles in my forearm. I'm almost better now, but I haven't benched in forever and haven't been able to do anything that requires grip strength, so no deadlifts either. Its been squats and good mornings for the most part. Keep the wrist in line with the elbow and keep your forearms strong. If you can make them as strong as your quads that's probably ideal, but maybe unrealistic, just maybe.

h.t.hall
12-20-2009, 04:21 PM
Wrist support for benching would be better with a strong elastic wrap like with most wraps or with an unelastic cloth-cast type wrap like the ones boxers use ?

Lones Green
12-20-2009, 05:08 PM
Wrist support for benching would be better with a strong elastic wrap like with most wraps or with an unelastic cloth-cast type wrap like the ones boxers use ?

They're sold as powerlifting wrist wraps for a reason.

You shouldn't be able to stand having your wraps on for longer than your 1 set they should be so tight, you can't do that with boxing wraps

twm
12-20-2009, 05:58 PM
i'm no expert like many guys on here but.. false grip might help also.

robchris
12-20-2009, 08:05 PM
In short, a lot of forearm work bro... (as Rob L. stated)

Hammer curls, reverse curls, wrist roller just to name a few. I also do hvy. grip work w/ grippers. It helps my wrist & hands feel solid while benching w/ max weights...
RC

thewicked
12-20-2009, 10:57 PM
my first question (asessment wise) is wether or not you're using a false or suicide grip..if you are...start using your thumbs...

if you're using your thumbs...squeeze the snot out of the bar as hard as possible. A quick fix would be to use wrist wraps but that won't build a more stable wrist long term.

I would suggest a few easy wrist exercises involving a medicine ball, bodyweight stuff...and then involve a few things like static holds on the bench like lockouts. Get your hands used to supporting weight. Wrist rollers, etc are great for dynamic wrist strength but from my experience (4 clients with old and not non-existing wrist problems along with my own to boot and having a vast knowledge of grip strength training) it doesn't help with supporting work.

Exercises from the vary basic push up plank..or holding the pushup at the lockout out position at the top of the movement for time not only kills your abs but works the wrist too. moving your hands in to the diamond formation or bringing them together condenses your body's contact point and decreases stability making it a solid progression once the original becomes harder....after that...plank ups...starting from the floor on your forearms and transitioning up into the push up plank position and then back down repeating the motion for reps adds another factor..

holding your dips at the top locked out...just like a bench press lockout...will help if you're looking for simple easy bodyweight stuff to allow for quicker adjustments without risk of injury.

I'll video these tomorrow and post them.

wrist rollers are the best for forearm strength. I posted a video on ALN's youtube about how to make one out of pvc VERY cheap with a very thick pvc pipe giving you an insane wrist and worearm workout.

thewicked
12-20-2009, 10:59 PM
sledge levering builds wrist strength but not where the kid is needing it ..only hitting the lateral sides of the wrists almost exclusively.

hey i love sledgehammers. I've levered a 16lb'er and have come close with a 20...but when it comes to wrist strength and stability from using them? nil

muscle_g
12-21-2009, 03:41 AM
I wrap my thumb around the bar. To help with this I always do my heavy lockout work with no wrist wraps on. AndI've been doing lots of Forearm/Wrist work, and gonna start back using my HeavyGrippers. Also I have been doing lots of Hammer Curls and Thick-Bar Curls. I'm hoping to get some Fat Grips for Christmas.

Thanks for the Replys everyone

NickAus
12-21-2009, 04:46 AM
I agree with Lones, I think you just need to make yourself keep em straight.
Verbal cues may help, I'm not sure it's a strength issue but maybe it is.
Hope that makes sense.

IronDiggy
12-21-2009, 06:58 AM
That is really bad.

You need to keep your wrist straight while benching.

Even if you don't break your arm (which contrary to the expert advise here, has indeed happened without gear) you can still get some severe soft tissue issues as a result of benching like that.

Anything I can do to fix this? it seems to just be when my hands get far enough apart I can't seem to keep it straight up. I've been relying on my wraps quite a bit lately because of this problem.

thewicked
12-21-2009, 07:06 AM
I wrap my thumb around the bar. To help with this I always do my heavy lockout work with no wrist wraps on. AndI've been doing lots of Forearm/Wrist work, and gonna start back using my HeavyGrippers. Also I have been doing lots of Hammer Curls and Thick-Bar Curls. I'm hoping to get some Fat Grips for Christmas.

Thanks for the Replys everyone

be careful not to over train or it will have a QUICKER reverse effect than any other part of your body. Just do things to slightly adapt into your training to benefit the wrist that way they get emphasis but not to be the sole focus more than say once for an exercise or two for a couple sets a week or twice. Even the strongest guys in armwrestling and grip don't attack the hands DIRECTLY constantly.


as far as hand positioning when you're benching the best way to explain how to keep your hands facing where they should be has led me to cueing my clients with this...

make a fist and make the flat of it face the ceiling..kinda like you're throwing a straight with both hands. Seems to work successfully with everyone so far.

Travis Bell
12-21-2009, 08:11 AM
Anything I can do to fix this? it seems to just be when my hands get far enough apart I can't seem to keep it straight up. I've been relying on my wraps quite a bit lately because of this problem.

Wraps are good, but like Rob said, work on your wrist strength and forearm strength.

Move the bar position in your hand a little farther out towards your thumb so that it's not setting right on the back of your palm

It may help to bring your grip in a bit as well for a little while (depending on where its at now) until you can correct the problem

Travis Bell
12-21-2009, 08:15 AM
If a movement is natural,it's natural regardless of the weight used.
It depends on the person,some people find behind the neck presses very unnatural for example,or wide sumo squats and deadlifts very unnatural to them,but others manage to handle unbelievable poundages without problems or even world records.
I don't mean to be the wise guy here ,perhaps it's a technique point i never paid much attention to,i'll in fact try it next workout otherwise.
It just feels natural to me to just lock the wrist back and concentrate on everything else and leave the wrist strength and balancing out of the picture...

I missed this point, but no, this is false reasoning

It's physics buddy. You don't want the weight behind your elbows, just like Lones said. It has nothing to do with shirts. When all you have supporting the weight is your wrists, once you get a decent bench you're going to regret that position as a) it's going to hold you back on your lockout and b) it's going to cause you some severe wrist and forearm pain.

I've had guys develop tendonitis in their forearms from benching with 3 plates because they bent their wrists pack

Just my 2 cents though

barbell01
12-21-2009, 08:32 AM
^ also, when your wrists are cocked back, your not putting all of your force directly into the bar which leads to a weaker bench....

IronDiggy
12-21-2009, 09:13 AM
Wraps are good, but like Rob said, work on your wrist strength and forearm strength.

Move the bar position in your hand a little farther out towards your thumb so that it's not setting right on the back of your palm

It may help to bring your grip in a bit as well for a little while (depending on where its at now) until you can correct the problem

I was thinking that. the problem I think started because my arms are so short when I get my hands on the rings due to lack of wrist mobility my wrist doesn't want to bend in far enough for 'competition grip' so I think my hand started bending back to compensate the mobility. I've started using the wrist roller every bench day as well. Don't know if it will help but I was thinking of buying some grippers too.

Travis Bell
12-21-2009, 10:34 AM
I was thinking that. the problem I think started because my arms are so short when I get my hands on the rings due to lack of wrist mobility my wrist doesn't want to bend in far enough for 'competition grip' so I think my hand started bending back to compensate the mobility. I've started using the wrist roller every bench day as well. Don't know if it will help but I was thinking of buying some grippers too.

A wrist roller is great. I wouldn't worry too much about the grippers.

Sometimes people can over do it with the grippers and it'll hold them back a bit.