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tnathletics2b
12-30-2009, 11:11 AM
I am putting together a gym in my garage (standard concrete garage floor) and was thinking about the impact of weights on the floor from deadlifting- especially if I gotta bail. What have you guys built for a deadlifting platform to protect the floor in your homemade gyms? Thanks for the suggestions in advance!

tnathletics2b
12-30-2009, 11:12 AM
P.S. I searched the forums, but couldn't find anything on this. If it has already been discussed, please shoot me the link!

StLRPh
12-30-2009, 11:15 AM
For some reason I can't post links but if you Google "weightlifting platform" there are a lot options. Including some from Ironmind and Straighttothebar.

ehubbard
12-30-2009, 11:18 AM
2 sheets of 4ft by 8 ft 3/4 inch thick plywood glued and screwed together. Top that off with 1/2 inch or 3/4 inch rubber matting (Horse Stall Mats) screwed into the plywood.

tnathletics2b
12-30-2009, 11:24 AM
For some reason I can't post links but if you Google "weightlifting platform" there are a lot options. Including some from Ironmind and Straighttothebar.

I think you have to have 10 posts. Thanks for the info!

tnathletics2b
12-30-2009, 11:26 AM
2 sheets of 4ft by 8 ft 3/4 inch thick plywood glued and screwed together. Top that off with 1/2 inch or 3/4 inch rubber matting (Horse Stall Mats) screwed into the plywood.

That sounds like what I had in mind. Thanks for the info.

StLRPh
12-30-2009, 11:42 AM
I think you have to have 10 posts. Thanks for the info!

I'm sure you're right (and now I'm one closer):)

JSully
12-30-2009, 11:49 AM
2 sheets of 4ft by 8 ft 3/4 inch thick plywood glued and screwed together. Top that off with 1/2 inch or 3/4 inch rubber matting (Horse Stall Mats) screwed into the plywood.

I used a single sheet of 19/32 OSB board as they were only $8 for a 4x8 sheet and got 3 of them. You can also get 23/32 too, which was a couple bux more.

Couple that with 3/4" rubber matting (check craigslist for rubber mats) and you're gold.

I got 8x12 rubber mats for $120 off craigs list and the boards ($24) for a total of $144..

PeteO
12-30-2009, 01:28 PM
Tractor supply has 4x6 x 3/4" horse stall mats that work perfectly for about 30 bucks each. http://www.crossfit.com/discus/messages/26/16673.gif

Kiaran
12-30-2009, 01:34 PM
I made a video earlier this year that might help you out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoGWbAb-Z90

I've made more modifications since then, but that covers the gist of it.

One other thing to note. Make sure you lay down some 6 mil plastic sheeting under all your flooring. You don't want moisture coming up from the ground into your wood or rubber flooring. It's cheap and you can get a huge roll at the hardware store for under 10 bucks.

mr handy
12-30-2009, 03:52 PM
I ended up getting one of the 4'x6' stall mats at tractor supply. It could be a bit longer, but the weights fit on it without any problem. If I were some where more permanent I would get some Ply and build a solid platform, or get a few more mats and cover my workout area with it and not worry about the ply. I really don't think there will be any damage to the concrete with the 3/4" rubber down.

My only concern would be that at some point the rubber may squish under your feet with heavy deadlifts or squats, at which point a plywood platform would shine.

JSully
12-30-2009, 04:35 PM
it's not like foam.. it's solid rubber.. it shouldn't have any give really.. just absorbtion so what's under it doesn't get ruined

mr handy
12-30-2009, 04:48 PM
I know the mats are basically solid rubber, but put 600+ lb on your footprints, and I could see a little give. not sure it would be enough to make a difference.
My mat has groves on the bottom about half way through, I would expect that they would let it flex or give a little more then a solid ribber mat, but I have never seen one. When I can deadlift enough weight to feel the mat give under my feet I will be sure to let everyone know... :strong:

Detard
12-30-2009, 05:54 PM
For mine, this is how I did it. This thing will last me a long long time.

Screwed/wood glue 3 sheets of 1/2" 4'x8' plywood together. 4'x4' 3/4" piece in the middle, with 2'x4' rubber sections on the edges.

http://img697.imageshack.us/img697/2935/platform130.jpg

http://img20.imageshack.us/img20/6172/platform129.jpg

JK1
12-30-2009, 06:50 PM
I used a single sheet of 19/32 OSB board as they were only $8 for a 4x8 sheet and got 3 of them. You can also get 23/32 too, which was a couple bux more.

Couple that with 3/4" rubber matting (check craigslist for rubber mats) and you're gold.

I got 8x12 rubber mats for $120 off craigs list and the boards ($24) for a total of $144..

The OSB is probably going to break down pretty quickly if you are dropping heavy deadlifts or heavy olympic lifts on it.

JK1
12-30-2009, 06:55 PM
I know the mats are basically solid rubber, but put 600+ lb on your footprints, and I could see a little give. not sure it would be enough to make a difference.
My mat has groves on the bottom about half way through, I would expect that they would let it flex or give a little more then a solid ribber mat, but I have never seen one. When I can deadlift enough weight to feel the mat give under my feet I will be sure to let everyone know... :strong:

Horse stall mats come in 2 basic styles: interlocking or straight edged and of those they are either solid rubber, or grooved for "drainage". The solid rubber ones are the ones that you want. I personally don't like the interlocking because its more cutting to get things to fit and over time the edges of the interlocking parts can curl up. The grooved ones are basically a 3/4 inch mat that is actually only a little over 1/2 of an inch of solid rubber because of the channels that are in the bottom. These are supposed to allow horse urine to drain from the stall or back of the trailer and not pool. They give quite a bit when you've got a 1600 lb thoroughbred in shoes walking on them--enough its easy to see the give-- or you are deadlifting anything over 500 or so. The solid rubber ones won't do this--or they shouldn't unless they are cheap.

mastermonster
12-30-2009, 10:09 PM
2 sheets of 4ft by 8 ft 3/4 inch thick plywood glued and screwed together. Top that off with 1/2 inch or 3/4 inch rubber matting (Horse Stall Mats) screwed into the plywood.

That's what I did. The mat is 37.88 at Tractor supply Co. total cost about 70.00

tnathletics2b
12-31-2009, 05:07 AM
Thanks for the advice and for the pics, this is exactly the info I needed :hello:

Athos
12-31-2009, 07:32 AM
I made a video earlier this year that might help you out.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aoGWbAb-Z90

I've made more modifications since then, but that covers the gist of it.

One other thing to note. Make sure you lay down some 6 mil plastic sheeting under all your flooring. You don't want moisture coming up from the ground into your wood or rubber flooring. It's cheap and you can get a huge roll at the hardware store for under 10 bucks.

That's a hell of a nice set up and some good ideas in the video.

Tim K
12-31-2009, 08:52 AM
Horse stall mats come in 2 basic styles: interlocking or straight edged and of those they are either solid rubber, or grooved for "drainage". The solid rubber ones are the ones that you want. I personally don't like the interlocking because its more cutting to get things to fit and over time the edges of the interlocking parts can curl up. The grooved ones are basically a 3/4 inch mat that is actually only a little over 1/2 of an inch of solid rubber because of the channels that are in the bottom. These are supposed to allow horse urine to drain from the stall or back of the trailer and not pool. They give quite a bit when you've got a 1600 lb thoroughbred in shoes walking on them--enough its easy to see the give-- or you are deadlifting anything over 500 or so. The solid rubber ones won't do this--or they shouldn't unless they are cheap.

That is one fat Thoroughbred! :D

I used stall mats in my garage and haven't had a problem. Eventually I'll build a platform - once it warms up some.

JK1
12-31-2009, 03:48 PM
That is one fat Thoroughbred! :D

I used stall mats in my garage and haven't had a problem. Eventually I'll build a platform - once it warms up some.

Its not uncommon to see thoroughbreds @ 1400-1500 lbs... the two we have are 17+ hands tall so they are not little horses.

Don't believe all the online "references' as to horse weights. Many of them are off by 150-200 lbs or more.

As a general rule: think quarter horse =1000-1100 lbs, thoroughbred 1200-1400 lbs, percheron = a ton or more. Good horse stall mats are made to withstand the weight of these animals WITH metal shoes on them. Good ones are hard to tear up and will last a long time as floor matts for powerlifting. That said, I've seen some cheap ones fall apart quickly with draft horses with cleet shoes on, so check the character of the rubber. It should feel dense and heavy, sort of like a truck tire. If its "light" be wary of it.

Tim K
12-31-2009, 04:15 PM
Its not uncommon to see thoroughbreds @ 1400-1500 lbs... the two we have are 17+ hands tall so they are not little horses.

Don't believe all the online "references' as to horse weights. Many of them are off by 150-200 lbs or more.

As a general rule: think quarter horse =1000-1100 lbs, thoroughbred 1200-1400 lbs, percheron = a ton or more. Good horse stall mats are made to withstand the weight of these animals WITH metal shoes on them. Good ones are hard to tear up and will last a long time as floor matts for powerlifting. That said, I've seen some cheap ones fall apart quickly with draft horses with cleet shoes on, so check the character of the rubber. It should feel dense and heavy, sort of like a truck tire. If its "light" be wary of it.

All of our horses are barefoot - it means we trim more often, sometimes every two weeks if we are combating hoof issues. We've seen a lot of improvement going barefoot from horses that have been shod incorrectly. It is hard to find a competent farrier these days.

The majority of our animals are warmbloods, so they are pretty hefty beasts. Two of them were Percheron crosses - big girls. Thoroughbreds look lean and light in comparison. Unless you have a scale, most horse weights are estimates anyway. We've taped 'em, but again that is only an estimate. I've seen two 18+ hand warmbloods at our shows - those were huge horses!

Even at 17 hands, a 1,600 lbs thoroughbred is one chunky thoroughbred. :D

JK1
01-01-2010, 10:08 AM
All of our horses are barefoot - it means we trim more often, sometimes every two weeks if we are combating hoof issues. We've seen a lot of improvement going barefoot from horses that have been shod incorrectly. It is hard to find a competent farrier these days.

The majority of our animals are warmbloods, so they are pretty hefty beasts. Two of them were Percheron crosses - big girls. Thoroughbreds look lean and light in comparison. Unless you have a scale, most horse weights are estimates anyway. We've taped 'em, but again that is only an estimate. I've seen two 18+ hand warmbloods at our shows - those were huge horses!

Even at 17 hands, a 1,600 lbs thoroughbred is one chunky thoroughbred. :D

I don't think this is the correct place to go into a lengthy discussion about the fine points of girth taping vs body condition scoring vs actual weights or appropriate hoof care in domestic equids (I have my opinions on that based on my experiences with mustangs, different zebra species and Przewalski's), however if you really want to do that, we can continue it via PM. ;)

The bottom line is good quality horse stall mats are made to withstand the weight of large ungulates with metal shoes on--this is as much or more stress than will be put on them from just about anything powerlifters or olympic lifters will do to them, even if they get stupid with throwing weights around. The stall mats are relatively cheap and easy to replace, so its worth it to get them.

Tim K
01-01-2010, 11:10 AM
Agreed, pretty much on all points.