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View Full Version : Anyone Here On A Whole Foods Diet??



Patz
01-09-2010, 01:21 PM
I've been reading up on the "whole foods lifestyle.

I don't want a DIET..I want a lifestyle change where I'm not counting calories or thinking about what goes in my mouth. I TRULY BELIEVE this practice can be followed, and body recomp (fat loss, etc) will come along with it.

Anyone doing whole foods, or something similar? Advice, tips, plans, etc?

Any help would be appreciated.

J.C.
01-10-2010, 04:39 AM
You'll have to refresh my memory on what the whole food diet is, because that could mean several things to me.

Alyion
01-10-2010, 07:31 AM
I always thought a whole foods diet was just 100% no processed stuff, things like fruit/veggies/nuts/meat/oats/rice etc.

If thats the case then i'd imagine 99% of the forum eat like that

Patz
01-10-2010, 07:32 AM
It's like..no processed foods, no pre-packaged foods, etc. A diet consistning mostly of fruits and veggies, a lot of leafy greens, nuts, and lean protein. It's mostly organic if not completely so. They tell you to shop the outer ring at the grocery store, which is produce, meat, fish, dairy, bread, and magazines (lol). It touts the benefits of vitamins and probiotics (digestive enzymes).

It sounds simple, I know. But, when you think about all the stuff you eat in a day that doesn't fit those rules, it's a lot harder than it seems.

My biggest thing is getting a plan together that helps me work this lifestyle into a 9-5 workday. Meal prep, foods that can last in temporary storage, etc. I already bought a rice cooker and veggie steamer. I'm just not sure what else to do. I know it'll have to be a gradual change though. If I go all out, I'll go into withdrawals..lol

Cmanuel
01-10-2010, 10:30 AM
And what's so great about it?

manowar669
01-10-2010, 11:25 AM
Try this:
http://www.paleonu.com/

Spartan936
01-10-2010, 01:08 PM
I am.

I made a grocery list of around 30 or so of the healthiest foods. No sugar, no white flour, no wheat, no processed stuff. I keep my fridge full of ready to eat stuff. Lots of brown rice, lentils, milk, cheese, steak, butter, olive oil, veggies, avocados... Out of all of the eating plans I've come up with, I definitely like the simplicity of this one the best. You do have to adjust to plainer food, however. It's humbling, but still good.

That paleonu site is pretty cool. I find myself disagreeing with lots of it, though. I don't see any striking evidence that grains and legumes are bad; except for gluten, of course. I think it's moreso the lack of animal protein and fat that makes people unhealthy... not the addition of grains.

IronDiggy
01-10-2010, 01:17 PM
Hey dude check out paleo I've just started it. But you don't really need to worry about calorie counting, just don't over stuff yourself.

efs just posted an article on it. here (http://elitefts.com/documents/finding_the_line.htm)

newfarris
01-10-2010, 02:13 PM
Cmanuel, the benefits of a whole foods or paleo diet, is that you avoid all of the chemicals, additives, high fructose corn syrup, and other elements of questionable healthfulness so prevalent in highly processed foods. There is also the train of thought that relying on whole foods allows for the not yet fully understood natural chemical reactions and cofactors that might not be present in, say, just taking a Vitamin A pill (not speaking against vitamin supplementation here). Whereas if one were to eat sweet potatoes or carrots, unknown other reactions that come along with the whole food may perhaps increase the absorption and effectives of the Vitamin A uptake, versus just a pill.

Cmanuel
01-10-2010, 02:25 PM
Cmanuel, the benefits of a whole foods or paleo diet, is that you avoid all of the chemicals, additives, high fructose corn syrup, and other elements of questionable healthfulness so prevalent in highly processed foods. There is also the train of thought that relying on whole foods allows for the not yet fully understand natural chemical reactions and cofactors that might not be present in, say, just taking a Vitamin A pill (not speaking against vitamin supplementation here). Whereas if one were to eat sweet potatoes or carrots, unknown other reactions that come along with the whole food may perhaps increase the absorption and effectives of the Vitamin A uptake, versus just a pill.

Cool, thats awesome if you can commit to a diet that difficult. I am of the group that embraces food science and technology (its what I study in grad school, afterall), but I respect people's opinions on the matter and will not turn this into a debate.

I guess the best advice I can give you for such a diet is to shop at a place like Sunflower market, vs. whole foods since sunflower is a lot cheaper. Also, choose local over organic, since organic doesn't have any substantiating data backing it up as healthier than conventionally grown food, though it may have less of an impact on the environment, depending on how the impact is quantified. So if they both have similar nutrient content, go with the local foods so you can support agriculture in your area.

J.C.
01-10-2010, 03:03 PM
This is mostly how I eat anyway. The whole food store near my house is cheaper than the supermarket, I don't eat processed food (well 95% of the time) and I eat a lot of vegetables. My mother is a vegetarian (but she cooked meat for the family) and was into the organic, whole food lifestyle before it was trendy so I've got some good habits.

KingWilder
01-10-2010, 03:17 PM
Paleo Diet...easiest **** ever...and not too bad once you get used to it (still do 2-3 cheat meals a week)

manowar669
01-10-2010, 03:29 PM
That paleonu site is pretty cool. I find myself disagreeing with lots of it, though. I don't see any striking evidence that grains and legumes are bad; except for gluten, of course. I think it's moreso the lack of animal protein and fat that makes people unhealthy... not the addition of grains.

The problem with the non-gluten grains like rice is hyperinsulinemia, if you eat a lot of them anyway. Same with all carbs, really, whether the source is oats, rice, wheat, honey, apples, or pixie sticks. Your body doesn't care, it's all sugar in the end.

cphafner
01-10-2010, 03:36 PM
I have an ex that uses Paleo diet. She loves it. Looks pretty damn good.

IronDiggy
01-10-2010, 05:00 PM
Paleo Diet...easiest **** ever...and not too bad once you get used to it (still do 2-3 cheat meals a week)

Agreed paleo is awesome. But I don't like grains in the first place. The only thing I am having trouble giving up is milk.

CaptainMorgan
01-10-2010, 07:24 PM
I'm eating a diet similar to paleo, only it's nothing but meats (fish, chicken, or red), vegetables and fruit with protein shakes. I also occasionally eat nuts like almonds and stuff. But I find I drop weight really fast while eating this way. When I count the calories I've consumed for the day, most of the time they're only in like the 1500-1700 range, and that's a massive deficit for me. Still, I'm getting in at least 200 grams of protein, so I don't think I'm losing muscle.

Do you guys think this is safe at all?

KingWilder
01-10-2010, 08:06 PM
Agreed paleo is awesome. But I don't like grains in the first place. The only thing I am having trouble giving up is milk.

yeah, I'm not convinced about dairy AND I'm not trying to really lose weight

so technically I'm doing Paleo + Dairy

tom183
01-10-2010, 10:29 PM
I'm eating a diet similar to paleo, only it's nothing but meats (fish, chicken, or red), vegetables and fruit with protein shakes. I also occasionally eat nuts like almonds and stuff. But I find I drop weight really fast while eating this way. When I count the calories I've consumed for the day, most of the time they're only in like the 1500-1700 range, and that's a massive deficit for me. Still, I'm getting in at least 200 grams of protein, so I don't think I'm losing muscle.

Do you guys think this is safe at all?

Paleo style diets themself are safe, you're just not eating enough.

platypus
01-11-2010, 12:25 AM
I'm eating a diet similar to paleo, only it's nothing but meats (fish, chicken, or red), vegetables and fruit with protein shakes. I also occasionally eat nuts like almonds and stuff. But I find I drop weight really fast while eating this way. When I count the calories I've consumed for the day, most of the time they're only in like the 1500-1700 range, and that's a massive deficit for me. Still, I'm getting in at least 200 grams of protein, so I don't think I'm losing muscle.

Do you guys think this is safe at all?

Just because you're getting you're required protein doesn't mean you're not losing muscle. If you ate 200g of protein and that's it for the day, do you think you would maintain muscle?

J.C.
01-11-2010, 11:45 AM
My problem with paleo is the lack of legumes and especially grains/cereals .

I just don't understand what is so evil about them. Good quality bread tastes great. Pasta is awesome. Potatoes and rice have saved populations. Saying that palaeolithic man didn't eat them and was healthy is a very narrow, selective view of history. The fact that man learned how to farm is what enabled the growth of civilization in the first place, if we didn't we'd have never lived long enough, or happily enough to do anything of worth. If it wasn't for the potato, the Irish nation wouldn't have grown. If it wasn't for rice, Asia would have never grown the way it did. Paleo blames the very foods that have allowed us to flourish up to this point. There is also evidence that the Irish were a very healthy nation when they ate almost solely potatoes, and Asians have often been recorded as very healthy despite having a diet based on vast amounts of rice.

It's possible to get too anti-carb, some people just end up a bit OCD about it. Unless you're one of those people who is convinced they are "carb sensitive" and gains pounds by looking at some wheat then I don't know what the big deal is. I have heard some good things about naturally large weightlifters keeping their bodyweight stable by doing paleo + dairy, but long-term it seems silly to turn your back on all these carby, farmed foods because you have pretensions of being a caveman. Sorry, paleo rant over!

Mercuryblade
01-11-2010, 12:06 PM
My problem with paleo is the lack of legumes and especially grains/cereals .

I just don't understand what is so evil about them. Good quality bread tastes great. Pasta is awesome. Potatoes and rice have saved populations. Saying that palaeolithic man didn't eat them and was healthy is a very narrow, selective view of history. The fact that man learned how to farm is what enabled the growth of civilization in the first place, if we didn't we'd have never lived long enough, or happily enough to do anything of worth. If it wasn't for the potato, the Irish nation wouldn't have grown. If it wasn't for rice, Asia would have never grown the way it did. Paleo blames the very foods that have allowed us to flourish up to this point. There is also evidence that the Irish were a very healthy nation when they ate almost solely potatoes, and Asians have often been recorded as very healthy despite having a diet based on vast amounts of rice.

It's possible to get too anti-carb, some people just end up a bit OCD about it. Unless you're one of those people who is convinced they are "carb sensitive" and gains pounds by looking at some wheat then I don't know what the big deal is. I have heard some good things about naturally large weightlifters keeping their bodyweight stable by doing paleo + dairy, but long-term it seems silly to turn your back on all these carby, farmed foods because you have pretensions of being a caveman. Sorry, paleo rant over!

No need to apologize for the rant as this was a beautiful post.

The idea that because humans did something a few thousand years ago, and it's somehow more "natural" and "better" is laughable.

The paleo diet has some very great aspects of it, I'm, but people seemed to get so wrapped up in a philosophy that they start to lose the ability to view things objectively.

VikingWarolord has mentioned this in a lot of carb posts. The reason that every is so afraid of carbs and they get such a bad rap is because they are really easy to go overboard on. It's not hard to scarf down a giant plate of pasta or a giant blob of mashed potatoes. If you start replacing those portions with things that are full of fiber and low on calories (ie vegetables) it's not suprising that you lose weight.

I eat pretty close to the paleo-diet (lots of nuts, meat, veggies, and fruit) but I also find that carb meals can have their place, especially in the morning (to get my blood sugar up) and on training days.

OP: If you really want to stop counting calories, I would say your best bet is to start finding recipes that are really vegetable heavy. I started upping my greens intake, and I can say that I actually crave vegetables, they no longer are just something I eat because I know they are good for me. You can make reasonable meals (in terms of calories) that are incredibly filling and satisfying.

skinny99
01-11-2010, 12:21 PM
Just an observation,It seems that the paleo+dairy plan would/has worked good for a bigger lifter/BB as they need a large amount of protein but don't want a calorie excess. What are the most protein dense foods,meat right? So that works in paleo's favor. That is why steak and milk always work.

I also agree it is really easy to overeat on carbs,they are freakin good!

getfit
01-11-2010, 12:39 PM
I have an ex that uses Paleo diet. She loves it. Looks pretty damn good.

Yep,a good friend of mine as well.

J.C.
01-11-2010, 12:54 PM
No need to apologize for the rant as this was a beautiful post.

I've observed from a few posts that you, me and VikingWarlord have similar ideas on this matter.



It's not hard to scarf down a giant plate of pasta or a giant blob of mashed potatoes.

This makes them very useful if you are trying to gain weight though. I have a hunch that if you took two so-called "hardgainers" who were eating a reasonable amount of protein but still not gaining, and gave one of them another large protein shake to drink each day, and told the other one to double their bowl of pasta post-training, and double the amount of bread they ate at breakfast, the one with the extra carbs would do better. More total calories, combined with a huge insulin response, and its very easy to do. It is really too easy to up your total calories by eating lots of pasta or bread. Really, really easy when you realize how much pasta/bread you can actually eat when trying! Assuming other factors are equal, some fat gain isn't a concern, and protein is reasonable, total calories beats total protein.

ray34iyf
01-11-2010, 03:55 PM
Probably won't make any kind of difference as far as body comp goes, as long as cals and macros are the same, but it has the possibility to make all the difference in the world health wise.

Our bodies aren't meant to process all of the artificial crap that is in everyday food now a days, and if you take steps to improve your health, training would without a doubt improve, along with all other aspects of your life.

From what I've heard it really isn't easy though. You'd be a real minority as far as the diet goes and going about buying groceries and eating out could be difficult. Also, if your diet has been mainly processed stuff, prepare for some fun withdrawal.

I say go for it. You've got one life, why not try to optimize your situation to the fullest extent?

Patz
01-12-2010, 04:13 PM
Thank you thank you thank you, everyone. Last time I checked this thread, I was losing hope that it would get much response.

Just to touch on the last post, I wholeheartedly believe my body will slowly lean out to a respectable level over time whole following a whole foods diet. I really don't think counting calories is a concern, and I think if I eat that good food in amounts that satisfy me I'll probably end up on the low end of calories anyway. I just have a hard time believing that the average person will gain weight on a clean diet like that if they aren't purposefully trying to or are avoiding any and all exercise.

Neither of those scenerios will be me. I have a decent amount of muscle mass, but I want to be able to see it and eventually increase it a bit. I'm not lean enough for my liking. I would guess I'm 20% bodyfat, and that certainly leaves me with some room to lean out. I really think the body has a place it is comfortable being when storing fat for food shortages isn't a concern. Some of that was discussed in The Gabriel Method. John Gabriel essentially says the body craves nutrients, and much of the processed food we eat is so lacking in nutrients that all the body can do is store much of it as fat. Then, the body quickly begins craving those missed nutrients, and the more garbage we eat the more of it is required for the body to extract the small amount of useable nutrition in said food. The cycle continues, and more and more fat is stored.

But, if it's getting a clean diet with all the necessary nutrition, the body will naturally lean out to the body that is necessary for us to perform physically. He used an example of a fat cat that did nothing, then one day was chased by a dog. After being chased by the dog, the cat started to get leaner (and faster as a result) while taking in the same amount of food it already did. It wasn't out running on a treadmill or squatting ATF. Its body just deemed it necessary to be leaner to outrun that damned dog. I'm not very good at explaining his examples, but that book is really interesting and has a lot of known ideas and theories explained in a way that really makes sense.

My ideal diet would consist of meat, nuts, veggies, fruit, oats, whole grains, brown rice, beans and potatoes, and respectable amounts of breads and cheeses.

Oh..and buttery popcorn at the movies. That's my one deal breaker. :)

Aside from the popcorn, I want to completely disregard any calore counting and just eat when I need to. And if my girl and I go to dinner, I want to get the salmon with rice and not worry too much about what's in it. You can't always pack cauliflower and nuts with you and 30 years of me eating whatever I want isn't just gonna be erased any easier than me forgetting how to ride a bike. I'm hoping for 90% whole foods.



I agree with the statement that it's folish to disregard advances in nutrition. There's reasons the average life expectancy has increased and nutrition has a lot to do with it. Not all modern foods are bad. If it grows or is a natural mainfestation of something that grew or lived (within reason), then I can't see the downside (like rice) to eating it.

Another thing I really want to avoid is high fructose corn syrup and ridiculous amounts of sodium. And I really want to be done with artificial sweeteners. I wont have a hard time dropping diet or regular soda, but finding something fizzy to keep me occupied at my desk will drive me nuts.

Ij just need to get the meal prep and snack thing down. If anyone has a good example of their typical day (and hopefully including an 8hour work day), I'd appreciate seeing it.

J.C.
01-13-2010, 03:24 AM
Just an FYI, giving up soda is easy to do with time. I once went a few months without, I was drinking mostly water and then somebody offered me a coke and I almost felt like throwing up once I drank it.

I drink soft drinks from time to time, but the body definitely gets used to a whole food diet. You'll eventually find yourself craving vegetables too.

Drink green tea instead. :)

CaptainMorgan
01-13-2010, 11:28 AM
Paleo style diets themself are safe, you're just not eating enough.


Just because you're getting you're required protein doesn't mean you're not losing muscle. If you ate 200g of protein and that's it for the day, do you think you would maintain muscle?


What do you guys suggest I eat more of then? Once I get my daily protein requirement in, I no longer am hungry. I don't even have the energy to eat anything else for the day. And I try to keep my fat intake below 50 and carbs below 100. As long as I'm not dropping more than 5 pounds a week, I don't see the problem.

Astreocclu
01-13-2010, 11:50 AM
Just an FYI, giving up soda is easy to do with time. I once went a few months without, I was drinking mostly water and then somebody offered me a coke and I almost felt like throwing up once I drank it.

I drink soft drinks from time to time, but the body definitely gets used to a whole food diet. You'll eventually find yourself craving vegetables too.

Drink green tea instead. :)

same thing happened to me durign the bills and colts game, i had box seat tickets and it was free soda and i just kept drinking. At the end of the game i really did throw up. yesterday it was my dads birthday we had extra choclately cake and icecream, and i felt like crap afterwards

tom183
01-13-2010, 03:31 PM
What do you guys suggest I eat more of then? Once I get my daily protein requirement in, I no longer am hungry. I don't even have the energy to eat anything else for the day. And I try to keep my fat intake below 50 and carbs below 100. As long as I'm not dropping more than 5 pounds a week, I don't see the problem.

I do. 5 pounds of weight loss per week is too fast.

I dont even know what to say about the bolded sentence.

ray34iyf
01-13-2010, 08:38 PM
I'd say that the reason we are living longer has nothing to do with advances in nutrition. As far as that goes, the only advances I see are ones that are geared towards longevity of shelf life, as opposed to health.

The reason we are living longer has everything to do with modern medicine and the fact that we aren't dropping dead from diseases left and right anymore.

VikingWarlord
01-13-2010, 08:54 PM
VikingWarolord has mentioned this in a lot of carb posts. The reason that every is so afraid of carbs and they get such a bad rap is because they are really easy to go overboard on. It's not hard to scarf down a giant plate of pasta or a giant blob of mashed potatoes. If you start replacing those portions with things that are full of fiber and low on calories (ie vegetables) it's not suprising that you lose weight.

Aww, you're quoting me. You totally have a man-crush.


I've observed from a few posts that you, me and VikingWarlord have similar ideas on this matter.

And so do you, sir!

Elwood, look into The Warrior Diet by Ori Hofmekler. While you might not want to follow the regimen (and assuming you can get past some of the hyperbole) it goes into a lot of the things you addressed in your first post. You can get it for like $12 on Amazon right now.

I had great success with it a while back and then my personal life went to **** so I fell off the wagon, so to speak. While on it, my strength steadily increased and I generally felt better. I'm about to start doing it again.

Patz
01-15-2010, 04:04 PM
I read some on the Warrior diet.

Doesn't that play havoc with your blood sugar?

VikingWarlord
01-16-2010, 09:08 AM
I've never had any problem with blood sugar at all but have never measured it. It might mess with things if you have an existing condition, although I've also seen members on DragonDoor forums that have blood sugar issues and report that their level stays steadier on the diet than on a "normal" diet.