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View Full Version : New here, need help losing weight.



snow4me
01-13-2010, 07:27 AM
First off, hello everybody! Been away from the gym for about five years now but just started back last week. My wife and I have had two kids since then and my weight has gone out of control. I am 39 years old, 6'2" tall and weigh 333lbs. as of this morning. I do have a very large frame and a fair bit of muscle still. Starting January 5, 2010, I started back to my old lifting routine and 1/2 hour of treadmill at 3.5 miles per hour. I really like my lifting routine and really don't want to change it to a higher rep routine which I believe is suppose to lean you out. What I need to know is, how many calories should I be taking in to get me down to about 230 to 250 lbs? I have no problem being strict at breakfast and lunch but dinner is my problem. We all eat together and what is cooked, I eat. I figured it would be best to stick to a calorie diet for now to make it easier on my wife. She has enough to do without me adding a bunch of special prep and foods to her routine, remember, two little kids. Any help would be appreciated.

P.S. I have cut out the 2-3 Mountain Dew's a day and have been drinking plenty of water. Truth be told, I take in so many calories as it is, the removal of the pop won't make enough difference to show on the scale. Also, I might add that I get ravenous when I am hungry.:confused:

Unreal
01-13-2010, 08:31 AM
Only you can figure out your calorie needs. Track them and adjust as needed to continue to lose weight. As for higher reps to lean out, that is BS. Lift hard and heavy to try to preserve lean mass.

shipdadip
01-13-2010, 08:38 AM
What I need to know is, how many calories should I be taking in

Less than you are burning.

David Trantham
01-13-2010, 09:07 AM
First off, hello everybody! Been away from the gym for about five years now but just started back last week. My wife and I have had two kids since then and my weight has gone out of control. I am 39 years old, 6'2" tall and weigh 333lbs. as of this morning. I do have a very large frame and a fair bit of muscle still. Starting January 5, 2010, I started back to my old lifting routine and 1/2 hour of treadmill at 3.5 miles per hour. I really like my lifting routine and really don't want to change it to a higher rep routine which I believe is suppose to lean you out. What I need to know is, how many calories should I be taking in to get me down to about 230 to 250 lbs? I have no problem being strict at breakfast and lunch but dinner is my problem. We all eat together and what is cooked, I eat. I figured it would be best to stick to a calorie diet for now to make it easier on my wife. She has enough to do without me adding a bunch of special prep and foods to her routine, remember, two little kids. Any help would be appreciated.

P.S. I have cut out the 2-3 Mountain Dew's a day and have been drinking plenty of water. Truth be told, I take in so many calories as it is, the removal of the pop won't make enough difference to show on the scale. Also, I might add that I get ravenous when I am hungry.:confused:


track your calories, wright down everything you eat, and i mean everything figure you calories for a week and then make then necessary adjustments. usually all you want to lose is 2or 3 lbs per week anything more is muscle.you can go online for the calories in food. try this i promise it works. or your could hire someone to help with diet!!

snow4me
01-13-2010, 09:09 AM
Less than you are burning.

Well, I understand that. What I am trying to do is find a baseline of what I might start at without feeling too hungry all the time and adjust from there. Isn't there a way to figure out how many calories a 250 lb person should take in and adjust from there?

snow4me
01-13-2010, 09:13 AM
track your calories, wright down everything you eat, and i mean everything figure you calories for a week and then make then necessary adjustments. usually all you want to lose is 2or 3 lbs per week anything more is muscle.you can go online for the calories in food. try this i promise it works. or your could hire someone to help with diet!!


Thank you for the replies! I will start writing them down today. So, if I lose more than 2-3 lbs per week, I will be losing the muscle I already have or am in the process of building rather than fat???

AKMass
01-13-2010, 09:52 AM
Thank you for the replies! I will start writing them down today. So, if I lose more than 2-3 lbs per week, I will be losing the muscle I already have or am in the process of building rather than fat???

Correct.

tnathletics2b
01-13-2010, 10:06 AM
It is really hard to lose weight and gain muscle mass at the same time because they are self-defeating goals to some extent. You have to take in a decent amount of calories to build muscle, which is counterproductive to losing weight. What you need to do is recomposition your self. You have to lose the weight, get down to a good weight, say 185 (just throwing it out- this is whatever your goal weight is) for a 6'2" person, then after you have dieted off a lot of fat, start eating again the right way (read: healthy) and start working out to gain mass. Then you can build back up to 215 or 220 or whatever your goal is and have a relatively low bodyfat while having a solid muscular frame.

Go to fitday.com and register an account. Track all of your calories everyday for 2-3 weeks while weighing yourself then take in less than you were taking in. For example, let's say you weigh 330 for 3 weeks while taking in 3000 calories a day. To lose weight, shoot for 2500 calores a day or 2000 a day, which is generally good for losing 1-2 pounds a week.

Also, a "lean look" is obtained through dieting, not performing a certain amount of reps.

shipdadip
01-13-2010, 12:00 PM
Well, I understand that. What I am trying to do is find a baseline of what I might start at without feeling too hungry all the time and adjust from there. Isn't there a way to figure out how many calories a 250 lb person should take in and adjust from there?

Do a search. There are charts avaliabe and it also depends on your age, height, activity level, and eye color