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jcwhackflava
02-02-2010, 12:20 PM
I stopped with GOMAD after gaining roughly 7kgs in 2 weeks. I want to maintain my current weight but need a replacement for milk as it seems to making my skin breakout..i wanted to continue drinking 2 litres of milk everyday but if it's going to cause acne i need to find something else. no dairy apparently.. ive started using aloe vera gel for my skin as it helped last time with the redness but i doubt theres any point in using it if i drink milk as surely it will just continue giving me acne


what do you guys suggest that i have in place of milk? potatoes, bread, pasta, chicken? what would be the equivalent of 2 litres milk


thanks:)

SDS
02-02-2010, 02:49 PM
It's more expensive, but hazelnut milk is awesome.

depotman
02-02-2010, 03:39 PM
^ Agreed, I use Soy milk instead of regular milk. Soy milk does have a decent amount of protein to it. I usually mix 2-3 strawberries in with my protein shakes and it ends up tasting pretty good.

J.C.
02-02-2010, 04:06 PM
There's a lot of bad press about using soy milk. I'm not saying you definitely shouldn't drink it, but I am saying there's a lot of evidence to suggest its not such a great idea for an athlete.

OP - you can use any other protein source; meat, fish, protein powder. But none are going to be as cheap and easy as milk.

BULK_BOY
02-02-2010, 08:00 PM
Well I have been using Soy Milk for the past two months and I think it is working out just fine. No complications and it tastes pretty damn good (Chocolate So Nice brand) As for bad press.....I haven't heard of any.

tom183
02-02-2010, 09:20 PM
^--It's out there. Google 'soy and testosterone'. I think you'll be surprised.

StLRPh
02-03-2010, 05:03 AM
There is more to GOMAD than the calories and protein. Milk also contains IGF-1 which none of the other subs have. Also, soy milk = liquid estrogen.

BULK_BOY
02-03-2010, 08:07 PM
^--It's out there. Google 'soy and testosterone'. I think you'll be surprised.

Thanks. I did. What I found was a lot of people fighting for and against Soy consumption by humans. I don't know who the *uck to believe. God, I hate the internet some times. Guess I'll have to hire a nutritionist and get some real un-biased facts.

TKisner
02-03-2010, 09:01 PM
Guess I'll have to hire a nutritionist and get some real un-biased facts.
I mean no offense whatsoever, but that is absolutely hilarious.

BULK_BOY
02-04-2010, 05:12 AM
I mean no offense whatsoever, but that is absolutely hilarious.

Please tell me why. I'm curious.

StLRPh
02-04-2010, 06:18 AM
If you're really curious go to:
www.pubmed.org
and do a search for "Soy and Estrogen" and "Soy and testosterone"

This is not internet crap its published literature in medical journals. For what its worth I will not eat or drink any soy. I also tell my friend the same thing. If you're a woman then its great but if you're a guy I'd avoid it.

BULK_BOY
02-04-2010, 08:18 PM
If you're really curious go to:
www.pubmed.org
and do a search for "Soy and Estrogen" and "Soy and testosterone"

This is not internet crap its published literature in medical journals. For what its worth I will not eat or drink any soy. I also tell my friend the same thing. If you're a woman then its great but if you're a guy I'd avoid it.

Ok, so I did. And I found this.....

Effect of protein source and resistance training on body composition and sex hormones.

Kalman D, Feldman S, Martinez M, Krieger DR, Tallon MJ.

Miami Research Associates, Nutrition/Endocrinology Division, Miami, Florida, USA. dkalman@miamiresearch.com.

ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Evidence suggests an inverse relationship between soy protein intake and serum concentrations of male sex hormones. Anecdotal evidence indicates that these alterations in serum sex hormones may attenuate changes in lean body mass following resistance training. However, little empirical data exists regarding the effects of soy and milk-based proteins on circulating androgens and exercise induced body composition changes. METHODS: For 12 weeks 20 subjects were supplemented with 50 g per day of one of four different protein sources (Soy concentrate; Soy isolate; Soy isolate and whey blend, and Whey blend only) in combination with a resistance-training program. Body composition, testosterone, estradiol and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) were measured at baseline and week 12. RESULTS: Protein supplementation resulted in a significant increase in lean body mass independent of protein source (0.5 +/- 1.1 and 0.9 +/- 1.4 kg, p = 0.006, p = 0.007). No significant differences were observed between groups for total and free testosterone, SHBG, percentage body fat, BMI or body weight. The Testosterone/Estradiol ratio increased across all groups (+13.4, p = 0.005) and estradiol decreased (p = 0.002). Within group analysis showed significant increases in the Testosterone/Estradiol ratio in soy isolate + whey blend group (+16.3, p = 0.030). Estradiol was significantly lower in the whey blend group (-9.1 +/- 8.7 pg/ml, p = 0.033). CONCLUSION: This investigation shows that 12 week supplementation with soy protein does not decrease serum testosterone or inhibit lean body mass changes in subjects engaged in a resistance exercise program.


So sorry, I'm still confused.


Anybody in this forum have any more clear knowledge/ help about this subject?

StLRPh
02-05-2010, 08:11 AM
Prostate Cancer Prostatic Dis. 2009;12(3):247-52. Epub 2009 Jul 14.

Isoflavone supplements stimulated the production of serum equol and decreased the serum dihydrotestosterone levels in healthy male volunteers.
Tanaka M, Fujimoto K, Chihara Y, Torimoto K, Yoneda T, Tanaka N, Hirayama A, Miyanaga N, Akaza H, Hirao Y.

Department of Urology, Nara Medical University, Kashihara, Japan. masa-t@naramed-u.ac.jp

The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of supplementing healthy men with soy isoflavones on the serum levels of sex hormones implicated in prostate cancer development. A total of 28 Japanese healthy volunteers (18 equol producers and 10 equol non-producers) between 30 and 59 years of age were given soy isoflavones (60 mg daily) supplements for 3 months, and the changes in their sex hormone levels were investigated at the baseline and after administration. The serum and urine concentrations of daidzein, genistein, and the levels of equol in the fasting blood samples and 24-h stored urine samples were also measured. All 28 volunteers completed the 3-month supplementation with isoflavone. No changes in the serum levels of estradiol and total testosterone were detected after 3-month supplementation. The serum levels of sex hormone-binding globulin significantly increased, and the serum levels of free testosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) decreased significantly after 3-month supplementation. Among the 10 equol non-producers, equol became detectable in the serum of two healthy volunteers after 3-month supplementation. This study revealed that short-term administration of soy isoflavones stimulated the production of serum equol and decreased the serum DHT level in Japanese healthy volunteers. These results suggest the possibility of converting equol non-producers to producers by prolonged and consistent soy isoflavones consumption.

PMID: 19597532 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]



Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Apr;16(4):829-33.
Clinical and biological activity of soy protein powder supplementation in healthy male volunteers.Goodin S, Shen F, Shih WJ, Dave N, Kane MP, Medina P, Lambert GH, Aisner J, Gallo M, DiPaola RS.

Department of Medicine, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey/Robert Wood Johnson Medical School, New Brunswick, NJ 08903-2681, USA. goodin@umdnj.edu

Comment in:
Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2007 Dec;16(12):2795; author reply 2795-6.

PURPOSE: To determine if a commonly used soy protein supplement exhibits biological activity in vivo and in vitro, we evaluated an over-the-counter soy protein powder supplement using blood from healthy male volunteers and in an estrogen receptor in vitro assay. SUBJECTS AND METHODS: We recruited healthy male volunteers 18 years of age or older that were in good health. Treatment consisted of consuming two scoops (56 g) of pure soy protein powder (Puritan's Pride, Oakdale, NY) daily for 28 days. Serum testosterone and luteinizing hormone (LH) levels were collected on days -7, 0, 14, and 28 of therapy, and day 42. A reporter estrogen receptor (ER) assay was used to determine the effect on ER-beta and ER-alpha in vitro. RESULTS: Twelve subjects were enrolled with a mean age of 32.25 years (range 25 to 47). Serum testosterone decreased 19%(+/-22%) during the 4-week use of soy protein powder (P = 0.021) and increased within 2 weeks after we discontinued soy protein powder. Serum LH concentrations decreased during the 4-week use of soy protein powder then increased within 2 weeks after we stopped the soy protein powder, but the changes did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.20). Soy protein powder was found to induce agonist activity to ER-beta using a reporter estrogen receptor assay in yeast. CONCLUSION: Soy protein powder decreases serum testosterone levels in healthy men and acts as an ER-beta agonist; the significance of this biological effect with respect to cancer prevention needs further study.
PMID: 17416779 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]