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View Full Version : Pros and Cons Between Conventional and Sumo Deadlifts



AZBengoshi
02-17-2010, 11:32 AM
I've been doing trap bar deadlifts for the past several months and am ready to get back into competitive style deadlifts. I've always used the conventional version in the past but have had people try to convince me to switch to sumo, citing reasons like better leverage, safer for the lower back, etc.

When I've dabbled with sumo in the past, I have noticed I lift more conventionally. However, it was not a big discrepancy, and that may be partially explained by the fact that I had not trained much in sumo style.

I am six feet tall with long limbs, which seem to favor the conventional form. However, I also have a tendency to round my upper back on limit lifts, which may lead to back problems down the road. (I don't round my back at all when pulling sumo.)

Any experiences and/or observations regarding how to select deadlift form would be appreciated. Thanks.

AdamBAG
02-17-2010, 12:22 PM
Train them both.

Use the one you can pull the most in a meet.

Lones Green
02-17-2010, 01:38 PM
Train them both.

Use the one you can pull the most in a meet.

Agreed 100%.

There's really no reason to make a personalized list about the pros and cons of them, whichever one you pull more using, use it in a meet.

Training your opposite stance will make you stronger though.

CZERWIEC
02-17-2010, 02:34 PM
My personal opion is sumo's are not really deadlifting. Watch the mechanics its more like a squat. If you are competeing in a powerlifting meet train the way your stronger in either sumo or conventional (no sense leaving pounds on the platform). If you want to get stronger pull conventional, work on your techinque and you won't have a back problem. If you do other types of strength events like Strongman sumo lifting isn't allowed.

Pete22
02-17-2010, 03:45 PM
Train them both.

Use the one you can pull the most in a meet.

Do this.

AZBengoshi
02-17-2010, 05:17 PM
Great responses--thank you everyone.

blownby
02-18-2010, 08:10 AM
Train them both.

Use the one you can pull the most in a meet.

Yup...ditto here! Plus training sumo can help carryover to squat! I often will sumo after squating as it incorporates similar muscles!

and i will often front squat after conventional deads.....for same reason!!

Rugby Dad
02-19-2010, 01:45 PM
My personal opion is sumo's are not really deadlifting. Watch the mechanics its more like a squat. If you are competeing in a powerlifting meet train the way your stronger in either sumo or conventional (no sense leaving pounds on the platform). If you want to get stronger pull conventional, work on your techinque and you won't have a back problem. If you do other types of strength events like Strongman sumo lifting isn't allowed.

never heard anyone say that, not sure if I agree, but I can see the rationale.
If it's a squat then it's a squat starting from bottom up, which is much harder.

SELK
02-19-2010, 11:30 PM
I find them to be very different lifts. When training raw there is no doubt that my conventional deadlift is higher then my sumo, but once I add gear they are pretty close.

nothing is a better feeling then grinding out a conventional deadlift though, sumos are often hit or miss while a conventional deadlift you get to grind. I find conventional deadlift is far less technique which is really nice to end a meet with, too.

SELK
02-19-2010, 11:31 PM
Also even if I competed sumo I would do some conventional training especially if you ever want to do a local strongman show.

Lloyd Braun
02-20-2010, 09:25 AM
I'm a novice, so excuse me if this sounds ignorant. But I'm in the process of reading Starting Strength, and Rippetoe tackles this topic. The sumo stance is more of a leg workout than the standard deadlift. Like many of you have already stated, the sumo deadlift may translate more directly to squat improvements, and the sumo may be a better option for people who are dealing with a back injury.