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berfles
03-28-2010, 08:29 PM
I know nothing about heavy bag training, but I'd like to start using the one I have here. I need to get some wraps but I'm not sure which specific ones, I keep hearing about the Mexican wraps, any links?

Do I need gloves too or can I just wrap my hands and do it that way?

tailhold
03-28-2010, 08:46 PM
You can just just wrap your hands, I also like to use a little tape. Mex wraps are a little stretchy so they might stay i place a little better without tape.
As far as buying wraps and gloves and stuff I like combat sports.

john o
03-28-2010, 09:43 PM
It's not that difficult to hurt your wrist etc. punching on a heavy bag. From your question I'll surmise you are new to punching properly. Just like lifting you are usually fine if you do the movement properly, but we all know that isn't always the case. There is also is a big difference between the old sand bags and the "new" waterbags. I'd make sure I learned how to punch correctly. I would also wrap my hands and wear 160z gloves for at least a while.

If you are going to make the heavy bag part of your routine you might as well get the benefit of learning to puch correctly as well. That being said I have both 160z gloves and fingerless mma gloves I use. Hope that answers your question. Feel free to ask any others you may have.

NickAus
03-29-2010, 02:43 AM
IMO bag gloves will be fine, I never wrapped my hands for the heavy bag and did fine.

Like John said you will need to learn to punch well if you havn't already.

Mark!
03-29-2010, 03:27 AM
I said the hell with wrapping them and just bought some bag gloves for my heavy bag work, never had a problem. Definitely learn to throw a punch though, suck to be off from lifting because you sprained your wrist. Guy that used to show up at Judo here and there did that during his MMA class, wasn't too fun for him.

MadChef
03-29-2010, 12:26 PM
IMO bag gloves will be fine, I never wrapped my hands for the heavy bag and did fine.

You obviously don't have much power behind your punches in that case, or have never done any serious training because it is common knowledge that boxers who neglect to wrap their hands develop problems. Early on, I was a lazy boxer and wrapping my hands for every session became annoying. I said, to hell with it, and slowly but surely developed a problem in both my first and second knuckles, where the ligament that holds the tendon in place became weaker and weaker. Your hands and wrists are not meant to take repeated beating that you put on them through heavybag training. Be smart, wrap your hands. Having this happen to me ended my boxing career. I'm a chef and I use my hands a lot. My hands are beat up and I have arthritis in my knuckles. My wrists are shot and I can't write for more than a few minutes without my fingers going numb and having to shake out my wrists. My hands fall asleep at night and I wake up with them pulsating in pain. Of course, lifting can be tough when you have inflexible wrists. Benching, cleans, snatches all hurt.

The point of all this is, wrapping your hands is absolutely necessary; it increases your punching power, prevents you from twisting/spraining your wrist, protects your knuckles. It also feels good to have your hands wrapped. I, personally, like both traditional and mexican wraps. The traditional wraps are much heavier material, therefore shorter. You have to be efficient in wrapping them, it takes practice to get it down. Mexican wraps are stretchy, easier for beginners to get the hang of and provide good wrist stability. My only complaint is that because they are made of lighter material they tend to wear out faster, and sometimes they are cheaply sewn. Hitting the bag is the best cardio, use it as cardio and don't start beating on it right away. Go for rounds, put a song on and throw combos for three five minute rounds. Don't go all out right away, play with the bag, put together your footwork a little bit and have fun with it. Hitting it as hard as you can is fun, but your tendons and joints from your wrists all the way up into your neck need time to adjust. Good luck.

JSully
03-29-2010, 01:09 PM
I love the waterbags.. man that's a hell of a workout..

I agree, wrap you hands. If you have any kind of power or know how to transfer your legs to your hips to your hands, your wrists will regret it if you don't wrap.

My boxing trainer used to have me go for 30mins straight (no round breaks or anything) and that was some of the most hardcore cardio I've ever done. Learn to pace yourself through the entire round or song depending on how long you're going for. Practice combos and footwork as well.

I love hitting the bag, I need to get one.

Astreocclu
03-29-2010, 07:28 PM
You obviously don't have much power behind your punches in that case, or have never done any serious training because it is common knowledge that boxers who neglect to wrap their hands develop problems. Early on, I was a lazy boxer and wrapping my hands for every session became annoying. I said, to hell with it, and slowly but surely developed a problem in both my first and second knuckles, where the ligament that holds the tendon in place became weaker and weaker. Your hands and wrists are not meant to take repeated beating that you put on them through heavybag training. Be smart, wrap your hands. Having this happen to me ended my boxing career. I'm a chef and I use my hands a lot. My hands are beat up and I have arthritis in my knuckles. My wrists are shot and I can't write for more than a few minutes without my fingers going numb and having to shake out my wrists. My hands fall asleep at night and I wake up with them pulsating in pain. Of course, lifting can be tough when you have inflexible wrists. Benching, cleans, snatches all hurt.

The point of all this is, wrapping your hands is absolutely necessary; it increases your punching power, prevents you from twisting/spraining your wrist, protects your knuckles. It also feels good to have your hands wrapped. I, personally, like both traditional and mexican wraps. The traditional wraps are much heavier material, therefore shorter. You have to be efficient in wrapping them, it takes practice to get it down. Mexican wraps are stretchy, easier for beginners to get the hang of and provide good wrist stability. My only complaint is that because they are made of lighter material they tend to wear out faster, and sometimes they are cheaply sewn. Hitting the bag is the best cardio, use it as cardio and don't start beating on it right away. Go for rounds, put a song on and throw combos for three five minute rounds. Don't go all out right away, play with the bag, put together your footwork a little bit and have fun with it. Hitting it as hard as you can is fun, but your tendons and joints from your wrists all the way up into your neck need time to adjust. Good luck.

What about shaolin monks and other eastern fighters?

MadChef
03-30-2010, 11:50 AM
What about shaolin monks and other eastern fighters?

HAHAH... what about them?

JSully
03-30-2010, 12:36 PM
I don't think shaolin monks and other MIXED MARTIAL ARTS fighters are throwing 130+ punches in 3 minutes.. they have an array of kicks/knees/elbows/punches so their hands and wrists don't take as much of a beating as a boxers does.

Astreocclu
03-30-2010, 05:53 PM
Shaolin monks are known for punching pieces of wood for hours straight, putting pieces of papers on brick wals and punching them till holes appear in the wall etc.

berfles
03-30-2010, 06:29 PM
I'll definitely be sure to learn how to punch properly.

Any other brands of wraps? I was looking at a company called Amber but don't know if those are any good. I just want to stay away from sporting good stores because the brands they have suck 90% of the time.

john o
03-30-2010, 09:56 PM
I can't help you on Amber's. I pulld my smelly pair out of my bag. The brand is fade, but I think they are Ultimate. They are between a "mexican type" wrap and those old Ringside ones. So they have some elasticity. I should be training Thu. I'll try and remember to look in the product case for you.

john o
03-30-2010, 10:04 PM
Shaolin monks are known for punching pieces of wood for hours straight, putting pieces of papers on brick wals and punching them till holes appear in the wall etc.

They have mystical powers boxers do not possess. :)

KoSh
03-31-2010, 06:20 AM
I use Everlast wraps and they work fine. You can find them at Dicks Sporting Goods stores. I've never had any issues with them and they've done a great job.

JSully
03-31-2010, 11:16 AM
Shaolin monks are known for punching pieces of wood for hours straight, putting pieces of papers on brick wals and punching them till holes appear in the wall etc.

duly noted.

JSully
03-31-2010, 11:22 AM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shaolin_Kung_Fu

if shaolin is so well known for their punching brick walls and whatnot, surely, even wikipedia would have that since it is such a well known fact.. just sayin

Astreocclu
04-01-2010, 12:53 AM
I believe it was shoalin, as well as many other many other eastern marital arts. I believe okinawa guys were pretty enthusiastic about that kind of hardcore training. Thats a pretty skimpy wiki article, and im suprised you would post it, as it doesnt really further anything. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7qHL2PSpecI at 320 he punches the wall. Its also in various pop culture, which takes it from the real thing. Not saying that these guys are the best way, or even the right way, but it was a genuine question. I think you guys are exaggerating this whole deal. I use to hit the bag for months bare-knuckel (looking back itwas stupid just for the fact it tore my skin on my knuckles up). Now i use glove bags and im still fine, ive never wrapped for a bag for more then a week.

NickAus
04-01-2010, 02:12 AM
You obviously don't have much power behind your punches in that case, or have never done any serious training because it is common knowledge that boxers who neglect to wrap their hands develop problems. Early on, I was a lazy boxer and wrapping my hands for every session became annoying. I said, to hell with it, and slowly but surely developed a problem in both my first and second knuckles, where the ligament that holds the tendon in place became weaker and weaker. Your hands and wrists are not meant to take repeated beating that you put on them through heavybag training. Be smart, wrap your hands. Having this happen to me ended my boxing career. I'm a chef and I use my hands a lot. My hands are beat up and I have arthritis in my knuckles. My wrists are shot and I can't write for more than a few minutes without my fingers going numb and having to shake out my wrists. My hands fall asleep at night and I wake up with them pulsating in pain. Of course, lifting can be tough when you have inflexible wrists. Benching, cleans, snatches all hurt.

The point of all this is, wrapping your hands is absolutely necessary; it increases your punching power, prevents you from twisting/spraining your wrist, protects your knuckles. It also feels good to have your hands wrapped. I, personally, like both traditional and mexican wraps. The traditional wraps are much heavier material, therefore shorter. You have to be efficient in wrapping them, it takes practice to get it down. Mexican wraps are stretchy, easier for beginners to get the hang of and provide good wrist stability. My only complaint is that because they are made of lighter material they tend to wear out faster, and sometimes they are cheaply sewn. Hitting the bag is the best cardio, use it as cardio and don't start beating on it right away. Go for rounds, put a song on and throw combos for three five minute rounds. Don't go all out right away, play with the bag, put together your footwork a little bit and have fun with it. Hitting it as hard as you can is fun, but your tendons and joints from your wrists all the way up into your neck need time to adjust. Good luck.

Don't assume and don't be a smart ass.
I have trained at boxing clubs across NZ and Australia with some of our best, some wrap their wrists all the time, others do not.
I have two close friends who are pro boxers who I grew up with in NZ and they were so poor when they started they never even owned wraps.
As a boxer I lacked footwork and endurance, power was my strong point.
Anyway I wish the OP luck and was only giving my opinion.

MadChef
04-01-2010, 04:00 AM
Sorry, I guess you must just be the ultimate hardass then. When your opinion is bad advice, keep it to yourself.

john o
04-01-2010, 05:16 PM
I can't help you on Amber's. I pulld my smelly pair out of my bag. The brand is fade, but I think they are Ultimate. They are between a "mexican type" wrap and those old Ringside ones. So they have some elasticity. I should be training Thu. I'll try and remember to look in the product case for you.

Ultimate was the correct brand.

berfles
04-26-2010, 01:24 PM
I got some wraps a little while ago..

As far as when to do this, is it alright to do it consecutive nights? I was thinking Fri/Sat/Sun since I work out 5 days a week, I can't really spend much time hitting the bag during the week .

MadChef
04-30-2010, 07:40 PM
As far as when to do this, is it alright to do it consecutive nights? I was thinking Fri/Sat/Sun since I work out 5 days a week, I can't really spend much time hitting the bag during the week .

Use the bag as warm up on your bench days (DE days if you max). That's kinda what I do, its a good way to get blood flowing and to fire up the CNS. Superset a round of bagwork with a set of pushups on off days do help with recovery from heavy bench days. Remember to go light, do not try and kill the bag. It cannot hit back. This is difficult for beginners. Try to keep your weight evenly distributed on your feet, the key to punching power is balance. Most of the power generated comes off the back leg (try not to lunge into the bag with your punch). Turn your hips into each punch, turn your shoulder/arm/fist over as you extend and connect at the end of your reach, with your arm almost fully extended. The more extended your arm is when you connect, the more speed you will have on your strike (force = mass x acceleration). Don't stand right in front of the bag. Circle around it. Put a song on and have fun with it, it doesn't have to be a grueling workout. Always wrap your hands. Don't forget to go to the body :).

If the bones of your forearms/hands begin to ache, it's either a sign that your hitting the bag too hard with improper form, or your bones are just adapting to the stress. If it is just adaptation, the ache shouldn't be too unbearable, and should subside in a matter of weeks. It also shouldn't interfere with other activities, and you shouldn't really experience it while you are working on the bag (if you do, it's probably because you're using bad form and too much muscle).

Use youtube as a resource to learn how to throw different punches and combos, as well as getting ideas on how to use the bag as a tool. I also recommend jumping rope to learn how to be light on your feet.

Sorry about the lengthy post, but I would like to see more people use bagwork in their training as it is is/has been an invaluable part of my training regimine. I hope that this may help anyone looking to add a new dimension to their training.

MantiXX
05-17-2010, 01:43 PM
Shaolin monks are known for punching pieces of wood for hours straight, putting pieces of papers on brick wals and punching them till holes appear in the wall etc.

Been a while since I posted so I thought I might add my .02.

In Kung Fu systems there are ALOT of herbs used both extrenally and internally. For 'Iron Palm' training they apply a type of Jow (Dit Da Jow) that is similar to tiger balm or 'heat' that is applied BEFORE hitting, DURING hitting and AFTER hitting. It is thoroughly massaged into the hands/forearms etc. This stuff along with the massage helps to break up any bruising/blood co-agulation etc. Gets the blood/energy flowing into the hands/arms. They also would take various herbs/tea's/tonics internally -drink them, that would help strengthen the tendons/bones etc. (think very old style calcium supplement for bones etc).

Hope this helps.

PS: I agree with the wrapping also, since my left wrist is shot from years of heavy bag work without wraps. That small joint just isnt made for continuous daily heavy pressures. I wouldnt have believed it myself, but now 43, it aches all the time, makes lifts hard, bag work even harder. Do yourself a BIG favour, and spend the 1 minute it takes to wrap them :)

Peace out

Kute
07-12-2010, 08:49 PM
How come none of these kung-fu masters went anywhere in MMA? Bruce Lee was just an actor guys.