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pmm10990
04-14-2010, 06:11 PM
I dont know if there is another post about this already, but ill ask anyway.
I am going to start rugby next spring and was wondering was lifting/conditioning routine I should do?
I currently am training for powerlifting, but have been avoiding the evil cardio.
So What would be a good idea to do to get in shape for next season?

Counterweight
04-14-2010, 07:29 PM
I dont know if there is another post about this already, but ill ask anyway.
I am going to start rugby next spring and was wondering was lifting/conditioning routine I should do?
I currently am training for powerlifting, but have been avoiding the evil cardio.
So What would be a good idea to do to get in shape for next season?

The training involved for rugby is quite catabolic(90+ minutes of running) So, your body is going to change shape quite a bit in order to get in shape for it. Just talk to your rugby coach, see what he says and go from there.

pmm10990
04-15-2010, 07:01 PM
Well this isnt a college or school team.
This is a country club team.
So the coach is really no help, which is why i came here.

Astreocclu
04-15-2010, 07:33 PM
Well, i personally believe in getting strong in the offseason, and getting in best conditiioning shape a couple months out. WS4SB is a great routine for power, maximum strength and explosiveness in ahtletes. For running i would do HIIT sprints and sledpulls/prowlers and stuff if you have access.

pmm10990
04-16-2010, 08:20 AM
no prowler or sled, cuz money is tight, im a college kid.
and im far from a skinny bastard, im 300 pounds, but ill give ws4sb a shot.

Counterweight
04-17-2010, 12:04 PM
Well, i personally believe in getting strong in the offseason, and getting in best conditiioning shape a couple months out. WS4SB is a great routine for power, maximum strength and explosiveness in ahtletes. For running i would do HIIT sprints and sledpulls/prowlers and stuff if you have access.

Joe, this is where I'm going to have to disagree with you. All professional rugby players do long, slow cardio at least once a week just to get their cardio up to par with what you're going to experience during a game. Even huge monsters like Stirling Mortlock do it. Cardio training for the intensity during rugby requires a lot of time, most kids start running 2.5/3.5 months out.


But yeah, to the OP. Do HIIT to decrease your weight. You're going to need to get down to a lot better weight for Rugby, even as a forward you're going to suck ass at 300 lbs.

waynemeat
04-17-2010, 06:07 PM
300 Lbs and evil cardio tells me you'll be front row, thats unless your quite fast with lots of endurance.
What position do you play?

pmm10990
04-18-2010, 12:59 PM
I dont have a position yet, this will be my first time playing other then for fun, but i usually played forward or some sort.
And I have accepted the fact that the evil cardio must happen.
I was thinking of sticking with my PL routine for my strength, unless i should do a more endurance geared program.
The cardio is the only thing I am baffled as to what I need to do.

wanagetstrong
04-18-2010, 01:25 PM
I dont have a position yet, this will be my first time playing other then for fun, but i usually played forward or some sort.
And I have accepted the fact that the evil cardio must happen.
I was thinking of sticking with my PL routine for my strength, unless i should do a more endurance geared program.
The cardio is the only thing I am baffled as to what I need to do.

Are you playing Union or Rugby league ? the latter is the real game by the way lol...I maybe no bodybuilder but know about rugby league I played from 13 to mid thirties amature but hey I love the game ....Coaching local kids at the minute ......use google and plenty stuff on there......Good Luck by the way and at 300 lb if your ever in UK (yorkshire) and your any good the I will get you a game lol:)


FEW THINGS TO CONSIDER vvvvvvvvv

Strength & Power > Introduction

Players require strength and power to accelerate, turn, make a big tackle, and to break through defenders.

Improving leg strength often improves overall performance.
Strength is the ability of the body, or a part of the body, to apply or withstand force. The development of strength relies on resistance training and involves exercising at various loads, modes, speeds, angles and frequencies. The combination of these variables dictates the outcome of the resistance programme.

Strength is required for power production, stabilising a joint, supporting arms and legs (core stability), avoiding injury, and coping with contact. The resistance used during strength training can be your bodyweight, bodyweight plus a weighted vest, barbells and dumbells with light, medium or heavy loads, medicine balls or an unstable surface such as a wobble board or swiss ball. The unstable surface creates resistance for the body to work against.

Resistance training uses Repetition Maximum as a scale of resistance. For example, the weight that a player can lift for only 1 repetition during a bench press is classified as a 1 RM. Similarly, a weight that can only be lifted for 10 repetitions during a squat is termed a 10 RM resistance. Repetition maximums, or percentages of RM's are used as guidelines during Strength and Power Programmes.

Power
It is the application of speed that translates strength into power. Whatever the level of resistance, the aim is to move quickly with control and correct technique

It is essential that players develop strength and core stability before progressing to power drills. Strength alone will enhance speed and tackle breaking ability even before starting specific power training options. Power training options include sprinting while wearing a weighted vest or pulling a sled, plyometrics, and Olympic lifts. Consider all the training principles before starting a strength or power programme.



try here http://www.fitness4rugbyleague.com/

GOOD LUCK

waynemeat
04-18-2010, 02:06 PM
I dont have a position yet, this will be my first time playing other then for fun, but i usually played forward or some sort.
And I have accepted the fact that the evil cardio must happen.
I was thinking of sticking with my PL routine for my strength, unless i should do a more endurance geared program.
The cardio is the only thing I am baffled as to what I need to do.

If I knew your position I could give you a proper routine to follow.
At youth I played on both national and international levels as a loose head prop and open side flanker. Iíve also helped to coach several forward packs in local senior league rugby union teams.

pmm10990
04-19-2010, 01:54 AM
Thanks for the info so far.
I am going to assume im going to be a forward, due to my size and wat my friend who is getting me into tells me.
I was alos a lineman when i played football, but thats been a years since and all i do is lift.
So lets say im a forward, and will probably be on the front line of the scrum.

waynemeat
04-19-2010, 12:06 PM
Thanks for the info so far.
I am going to assume im going to be a forward, due to my size and wat my friend who is getting me into tells me.
I was alos a lineman when i played football, but thats been a years since and all i do is lift.
So lets say im a forward, and will probably be on the front line of the scrum.

Page A1/A2 for 4 weeks.
Page B1/B2 week 6 onwards.
Train with a ball where possible.

http://w.ayne.me/temp/u21.pdf

pmm10990
04-19-2010, 02:48 PM
Thanks dude wat is the set rep sceme for the A1/A2 period

waynemeat
04-20-2010, 12:34 PM
A1/A2
2 - 3 Sets of 5-8 Reps
Use 60% - 80% weight. You need to perform SLOW, steady and full movements.

Stretching isn't mentioned but I'd recommend 20-45 seconds stretch on all major muscle groups before and after all workouts.
I found that the best way to recovery from a sprint session was spending 20 minutes in the pool/ cold water spa.

Never do nothing. Use a recovery session for any days that you need to take off.

B1/B2 was used as a build up to trial provincial games and lasted 20 weeks without a full rest/ deload week.

When you start to get together with the team for training then substitute it for one of the speed/ multi sprint sessions.

pmm10990
04-21-2010, 09:44 AM
cool thanks.
If i dont have a pitch nearby can i use a football field as effectively for the multi sprint?
And i assume the Normal acceleration is just a 5m sprint. but what about the power bounds and the fast knees?
are those similar to power skips and high knees?

waynemeat
04-22-2010, 01:24 PM
Normal acceleration is just a 5m sprint. Power bounds are the same as power skips and fast knees are the same as high knees.
You might not think that 3 reps is much but if you put the effort into them you will really feel it afterwards and rewards will come when you finally get on the pitch.

I'd kill to be 18 again back training like this. The intervals were always my favourite. I got huge satisfaction from the feeling after them. Youíll know if you've done them right because once youíve finished, your heart and head will be pounding and your muscles will be burning. Don't forget to use your arms. Itís normal to throw up the first few times. Just remember to keep well hydrated.

pmm10990
04-22-2010, 10:05 PM
haha yea im sure ill feel that way some day too.
But being a big dude i hate the evil cardio, but ill get used to it again, and ive nvr thrown up from running before, but now i possibly will, im kinda looking forward to it.

setgree
05-17-2010, 01:42 PM
so, let's assume you're a forward, then you need some cardio. However this does not necessarily mean you should go out and run 90 mins. at a time- although that might be good, 12-13 miles takes a while to build up to. Also, you don't necessarily need to practice going at a slow pace for an hour and a half; rugby calls for going fast and then recovering. So here's an aerobic workout I recommend.

Go to the track, warm up (however you normally do) and then run a mile and a half (6 laps) all out. if you've never done a time trial, you're going to be tempted to run the first lap like a champ; ignore that impulse, stay controlled and then with 2 laps to go (at which point you should be in a lot of pain) start trying to accelerate and bring it in hard. Find your average pace per lap. Let's say you ran 6 laps in 9:00, (which would be good btw), then your average lap is 90 secs. The next week, after warming up, run 10 400s in 90 seconds, and if you feel good at the end do your last 2 or 3 hard. I'd do that once a week for like 6 weeks.

This workout is good for a couple of reasons. First, it is rugby specific because you'll be going hard for a period and then you get to rest (like walking back to your line). It'll extend the total amount of time you can sustain the pace. The rest might seem like a lot but by intervals 6 or 7 a minute is going to seem like a flash (if you still feel good at that point, you're going too slow; if you can't maintain the pace, you've started too fast).

Do this for like 6 weeks and then see what you can run 1.5 miles in; I bet it improves.

Some other track workouts that might be good: 8*300 with 2 minutes rest (these should be FAST) or 10x100 with 100 m. walk in between (this should be like 95% of your top speed).

good luck. This should prepare you well to be a forward.