PDA

View Full Version : Question on Box Jumps



Jay1
04-25-2010, 02:33 PM
For anyone who's trained young athletes. At what height of box do you start to consider good for standing and seated box jumps for middle school / freshman boys? (Any thoughts Travis?)

Travis Bell
04-25-2010, 03:02 PM
Really, just the fact that you're training them on the boxes is beneficial to them in the long run. Just a couple tips to help you

- teach them to land softly on the box. It'll go much easier on the ankles and knees
- teach them to hop off the box, not step off it. You can get away with stepping off the smaller boxes, but once that habit is put into practice on a larger box, they'll injure themselves badly
- make sure they are jumping properly, swinging their arms, getting into a deep almost squat like position and pressing off the floor hard.

It's really relative to the athlete as far as what box is good. I have one freshmen who can hit my 46" box any day of the week, but he's also very explosive naturally and about 150lbs. I have a sophomore with whom it's a good day if he hits the 20" or the 25" box, but he's naturally slow and also about 6' 6" and 280lbs

The main thing is to evaluate them, make sure they are making progress. Both of the mentioned athletes have made outstanding progress over the last 6mths by doing two forms of box jumps, once a week. The rest is dedicated to posterior chain and squat development.

Jay1
04-26-2010, 04:07 PM
Travis,
How many sets and reps do you typically have them perform? So, far these boys can easily get up on a 28" box from both standing and seated (just started this). I figure this give us two types of jumps and then with weight vest or holding D-bells would give us two more. We'll also do some plyos from time to time in between sport seasons.

Jay1
04-26-2010, 04:08 PM
By the way, Thanks for the help.

Travis Bell
04-28-2010, 09:40 AM
It somewhat depends on their sport.

Football players usually stick to around 4-8 reps

Wrestlers we vary it between 4 and 10

Track athletes (high jumpers especially) we keep it between 2 and 4, but up the number of sets

Jay1
04-28-2010, 04:50 PM
It somewhat depends on their sport.

Football players usually stick to around 4-8 reps

Wrestlers we vary it between 4 and 10

Track athletes (high jumpers especially) we keep it between 2 and 4, but up the number of sets

Our sports are football / basketball for one of them and football / wrestling for the other. They've started sprinting in track this year and they're also pretty good at baseball.

Thanks for the advice, we'll factor all of this in.

Travis Bell
04-28-2010, 06:37 PM
Ah yeah I forgot to list the basketball players, we actually keep them around the same as the football players

You don't want to do high reps, unless the goal if for GPP, but if you do high reps, you just teach the muscles to fatigue, whereas if you keep the sets short and explosive, you're just training the stretch reflex, which is what you want, to maintain maximum explosiveness.

KoSh
04-28-2010, 07:11 PM
Travis,

Did you consult the kangaroos before answering this guys post?

Travis Bell
04-29-2010, 07:59 AM
Travis,

Did you consult the kangaroos before answering this guys post?

haha I'm still conducting a massive study on them. I realize it means less time in the gym, working with actual athletes, but I think by taking at a look at an animal, it'll surely be more productive than working with humans.

This is sound logic right?