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View Full Version : What causes clogged arteries?



fixationdarknes
04-27-2010, 08:04 PM
To my understanding there is a whole lot of overhype and misinformation about saturated fats causing clogged arteries and that as a whole, that statement is simply not true. However, what then does cause artery cloggage? I tried googling but most of what I get is things saying "zomg dont eat fats they are bad for you" >_>

Mercuryblade
04-27-2010, 09:38 PM
To my understanding there is a whole lot of overhype and misinformation about saturated fats causing clogged arteries and that as a whole, that statement is simply not true. However, what then does cause artery cloggage? I tried googling but most of what I get is things saying "zomg dont eat fats they are bad for you" >_>

Genetics, inflammation, diet, and misfortune.

http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4440

Much like the frustrating cholesterol issue, there is no straightforward answer. There are links between saturated fat intake and heart disease, but since there are so many other factors involved, it's hard to isolate a direct quantitative relationship. For some people saturated fats cause problems, while for others, not so much.

People are starting to become a bit more interested in the inflammatory aspect of atherosclerosis, as that seems to play a larger role that previously thought.

As a general rule, with anything, I try to avoid going overboard in any aspect of my diet. I'm not panicking at this point and dropping all saturated fats from my diet, but I also try to get my fat from varied sources.

fixationdarknes
04-27-2010, 10:41 PM
Dang. I hate the lack of certainty haha. Thanks for the post, that was helpful!

Mercuryblade
04-27-2010, 11:12 PM
Dang. I hate the lack of certainty haha. Thanks for the post, that was helpful!

lol glad I could help.

My full-time job is cardiology research, so this stuff is pretty relevant to my interests.

Skalami
05-02-2010, 07:18 AM
were being told more and more its stress and sleep and living a happy life that helps keep you healthy. This kinda pisses me off... i can stop eating steak as much but wtf i cant force myself to be happy... now im upset from all this be happy talk which means my arteries are clogging and my test levels are going down...

thanks a lot for posting this question fixation...you made my test levels go down and shortened my life by a few years


btw this is tongue in cheek

Raleighwood
05-03-2010, 08:00 AM
A lot of stuff I've read lately says that it is connected to insulin resistance brought on by a diet high in refined carbs and sedentary lifestyle.

J.C.
05-03-2010, 09:07 AM
Has anyone here had blood work done and got more definite answers?

I used to think I knew about this stuff but now I find myself more and more confused.

First we're told it a lot of it comes down to genes. My Dad (who's 60) recently got told he had high blood pressure and high cholesterol for the first time, even though he's thin and eats well. Although he is the typical skinny-fat kind of guy who does no real exercise. I otherwise have no history of heart problems in the family, and I actually have low blood pressure (so does my mum) so I figure that genetically I'll probably be OK. But then my Dad got told that... so was it age, or a sedentary lifestyle, or what?

Then there's diet. My Dad eats a fairly low-fat, high-carb diet, with little red meat, dairy or eggs, and no processed food. You'd think he'd be OK. I eat a high-fat, high protein diet with loads of red meat, whole milk and eggs. But I'm not worried because we're now told (in a huge turnaround from 20 years ago) that blood cholesterol is not directly correlated to dietary cholesterol and therefore eggs and red meat are fine. So I think I'm OK. Am I?

Then exercise. I'm told exercise mitigates the effects of cholesterol, but how exactly? Does the fat get used as fuel instead of finding its way into the blood, or does vigorous exercise clean your veins somehow? Sorry if that's a stupid question but I've realised I just blindly accept what health and fitness articles tell me sometimes without wondering how it all works.

Confusing issue.

Raleighwood
05-03-2010, 01:23 PM
Has anyone here had blood work done and got more definite answers?

I used to think I knew about this stuff but now I find myself more and more confused.

First we're told it a lot of it comes down to genes. My Dad (who's 60) recently got told he had high blood pressure and high cholesterol for the first time, even though he's thin and eats well. Although he is the typical skinny-fat kind of guy who does no real exercise. I otherwise have no history of heart problems in the family, and I actually have low blood pressure (so does my mum) so I figure that genetically I'll probably be OK. But then my Dad got told that... so was it age, or a sedentary lifestyle, or what?

Then there's diet. My Dad eats a fairly low-fat, high-carb diet, with little red meat, dairy or eggs, and no processed food. You'd think he'd be OK. I eat a high-fat, high protein diet with loads of red meat, whole milk and eggs. But I'm not worried because we're now told (in a huge turnaround from 20 years ago) that blood cholesterol is not directly correlated to dietary cholesterol and therefore eggs and red meat are fine. So I think I'm OK. Am I?

Then exercise. I'm told exercise mitigates the effects of cholesterol, but how exactly? Does the fat get used as fuel instead of finding its way into the blood, or does vigorous exercise clean your veins somehow? Sorry if that's a stupid question but I've realised I just blindly accept what health and fitness articles tell me sometimes without wondering how it all works.

Confusing issue.

Exercise, especially resistance training, increases insulin sensitivity by several mechanisms. Insulin resistance is one of the precursors to high blood pressure, low HDL (good cholesterol, it helps remove the bad VLDL cholesterol), diabetes and other metabolic disorders.

Exercise also clears your blood stream of glucose and your muscles of glycogen. This aids in the prevention of triglyceride generation in your blood stream. It also helps your heart adapt to high pressure (when you are lifting heavy).

J.C.
05-04-2010, 02:55 AM
Exercise, especially resistance training, increases insulin sensitivity by several mechanisms. Insulin resistance is one of the precursors to high blood pressure, low HDL (good cholesterol, it helps remove the bad VLDL cholesterol), diabetes and other metabolic disorders.

Exercise also clears your blood stream of glucose and your muscles of glycogen. This aids in the prevention of triglyceride generation in your blood stream. It also helps your heart adapt to high pressure (when you are lifting heavy).

That is an excellent answer. Thanks a lot.

VikingWarlord
05-04-2010, 05:46 AM
People that engage in intense resistance training are (not always, but usually) going to have lower blood cholesterol levels. One reason for that is cholesterol is a building block of testosterone. Resistance training increases test production.

Of course, there's a lot more that goes into it than that so I'm generalizing. There are a lot of factors that determine overall cholesterol and circulatory problems. Like diet, no two people are going to be the same.

Mercuryblade
05-04-2010, 02:53 PM
To further complicate things, there is evidence to suggest that infections may play a role in MI's (related to my inflammation note),

http://jama.ama-assn.org/cgi/content/short/303/17/1751

Altephor
05-05-2010, 07:27 PM
Exercise, especially resistance training, increases insulin sensitivity by several mechanisms. Insulin resistance is one of the precursors to high blood pressure, low HDL (good cholesterol, it helps remove the bad VLDL cholesterol), diabetes and other metabolic disorders.

Exercise also clears your blood stream of glucose and your muscles of glycogen. This aids in the prevention of triglyceride generation in your blood stream. It also helps your heart adapt to high pressure (when you are lifting heavy).


See, this is where I get confused. Back in high school, I had low cholesterol (~140) and good overall health, then after I started lifting, and admittedly eating more, it shot up to ~200 with high triglycerides. It's beginning to freak me out because it's affecting me physically.. I get tired easily, I have bad circulation, and occasionally have chest pain (which is probably not related to the heart at all but is still scary). I'd really love to know how to bring it back down. Cause exercising doesn't seem to be doing it.