PDA

View Full Version : I have some questions on my diet and bodyfat



mx597turbo
08-20-2010, 10:15 AM
Right now, I'm 155 lbs and 17.2% bf. My height is 5'8" and I'm 29 years old.

I started trying to get into shape about 5 weeks ago. At the start, I was 164lbs and 22% bf.

I currently eat about 1200 - 1300 cal/day. I think it's healthy and spaced throughout the day:

Here is my food log from yesterday:

Ham & Egg sandwich: 220cal 11g protein
Coffee (milk, no sugar): 80 1
Protein shake: 120 23
Snack 80 5
Protein bar 200 20
Ice cream (1/3 serving) 50 1
Butterscotch candy 40 0
Weight Watcher dinner 240 11
Veggies 100 2
Hot cocoa 40 1
1/2 protein shake 60 12
Totals: 1250cal 87g protein

This is pretty consistent from day to day. I always get at least 80g protein. And I love veggies, so I always eat them and usually a salad with dinner.

My exercise for yesterday:
10 mile bike ride (up a lot of hills) 50min
5 sets situps/crunches
5 sets pushups (various types)
20 min walking with 50lb weight vest
30 min walking

I do at least 60min cardio 5x-6x/week and bodyweight exercises 4x/week (Including dips, pull/chin ups also). I don't have access to a gym right now. Partly because of money, partly because my schedule. But I'm going to try to hit some weights soon. At least I have the weight vest to add resistance to my body weight exercises.

So my question is why won't my bf go below 17%? It's been stuck in the 17s for over a week now. It fluctuates from low to high 17s daily, but won't drop. I even tried clen for two weeks, but it had very little effect other than making me shaky and giving me muscle cramps. It's still another week before I do another clen cycle, and I would like to be at least mid 16s by then.

What can I do to drop 0.7%bf in a week?

Off Road
08-20-2010, 10:38 AM
I see a lot of shakes, deserts, processed dinners, and hot cocoa. I'd start by cleaning up your diet and relying more on whole foods.

mx597turbo
08-20-2010, 10:54 AM
Thanks Off Road. Unfortunately, I'm not sure how to do that. I'm not a good cook, and I hate cooking. I guess I could substitute the shakes and protein bars with turkey and ham cold cuts, but I think I'd get physically sick from eating 5 thick slices of turkey in place of a shake...

The hot cocoa is only 20 cal, the other 40 is from milk I put in it. I'm not cutting this out.
The ice cream is all natural, but I can sub cold cuts in instead, or just cut out the cal all together.
I can cut out the butterscotch hard candy all together. They are 20 cal each, so I had two candies all day.
I'm not cutting out the Weight Watchers or Lean Cuisine dinners. I could never cook like that. They are low cal, high protein, and taste really good.

Mercuryblade
08-20-2010, 12:05 PM
Or you could just be an adult and learn how to cook for yourself

Off Road
08-20-2010, 01:05 PM
Well, if you are going to be eating all that protein in the form of powder and bars, might as well get the good stuff. For top quality supplements, you can't beat At Large Nutrition (http://www.atlargenutrition.com). Their products are award winning, top quality, and effective. My personal favorite is Nitrean...yummy :)

Alex.V
08-20-2010, 01:29 PM
That's a bunch of crap food. Learn to cook. Even if it's just boiling water for a few ounces of pasta and learning how to bake fish (Hint: Put the oven on "bake", put some salt and pepper on the fish, then wait 30 minutes. Squirt some lemon on it, or use ketchup)

Why are you logging butterscotch candy? 40 calories? Really?

How are you getting 100 calories from veggies?

You're probably burning around 600-1000 calories through exercise and taking in 1200. That leaves you with 200 calories to power basic functions. My body goes through that in 50 minutes just sitting on my butt. Your body is unhappy. Eat more. Like, 400-500 calories more a day, at the bare minimum. Lift some weights, drop the walking with a vest.

0.7% bodyfat in a week shouldn't be your goal, being healthy and getting in good shape should. Your body right now would rather drop what little lean mass you have left, since each pound of selfish, selfish muscle is asking for 30-40 calories a day just to exist. Given that your CNS alone requires around 100-150 a day, that means your body can have roughly 1.5 pounds of muscle mass on it to live comfortably. That's about a quarter of what my cat has.

(He can't cook either)

mx597turbo
08-20-2010, 03:42 PM
Points well taken. I'm going to be upping my intake to 1400cal/day for the time being. Also upping my protein to at least 120g/day. I'm working on getting some kind of weight regimen going. Thanks for the advise.

Iplan
08-20-2010, 03:52 PM
Or you could just be an adult and learn how to cook for yourself

It's comments like this one ^ that make this site soooo helpful at times......

mx597turbo
08-20-2010, 05:46 PM
It's comments like this one ^ that make this site soooo helpful at times......

Yeah, I just ignored that. For me, I'm working full time and going to school three nights a week working on my MBA. On top of that, my work commute is 1 hr each way, and my school commute is about 20 min each way. Free time is at a high premium in my life. Literally every minute of my day from 6:30am to 10pm is pretty much spoken for.

wags
08-21-2010, 08:11 AM
It's comments like this one ^ that make this site soooo helpful at times......
While it may not seem helpful, learning to cook real food is one of the best skills any person older than 8 can have these days. Cooking your own food, learning about culinary traditions, knowing where your food comes from, etc. is the best antidote to the pathological relationship Americans have with food.

Yes, it can be difficult and time consuming. But so is anything worth doing.

Just my .02.

mx597turbo
08-21-2010, 08:46 AM
While it may not seem helpful, learning to cook real food is one of the best skills any person older than 8 can have these days. Cooking your own food, learning about culinary traditions, knowing where your food comes from, etc. is the best antidote to the pathological relationship Americans have with food.

Yes, it can be difficult and time consuming. But so is anything worth doing.

Just my .02.

In that case, learning to diagnose problems with and fix your car should also be considered one of these skills. I've been working on cars since I was about 6 years old with my grandfather, so since I know about them and like working on them, everyone else should too.

And I do make my own breakfasts every chance I get. When I say I don't know how to cook, I'm comparing myself to someone like Bobby Flay. I can make a lot of foods, but it's only two of us in the house. We don't eat fast foods, pizza, or crap like that. I can't even remember the last time we went out to eat. And neither of us touch alcohol (at 29, I've honestly only had one sip of beer, and no hard liquor in my entire life).

Both me and my gf's mindset is that food is something that is necessary, but our lives don't revolve around it. It's simply a way to get the nutrients we need. I would be just as happy drinking a shake as eating a perfectly cooked steak from a chef. Happier actually since the shake would have all the good stuff of the steak, and none of the fats and cholesterol.

Now what's really messed up is how lower calorie foods cost so much more than regular foods. Example, I bought 25 calorie diet hot chocolate last night. It was almost $3 for eight packets. Regular 150cal is $1 for 10 packets... It's cheaper to be fat in this country (I'm in the US)...

blakjak12
08-21-2010, 09:34 AM
I don't know how to cook at all really and I still eat fairly healthy. You don't have to cook fruits, vegetables, nuts, whole-wheat products, dairy products, or canned beans (not refried but healthier options like black beans). Oatmeal and eggs are two more healthy foods that can be prepared quickly and with ease.That really only leaves you with finding good protein, and if you are pressed for time consider grilling a bunch of fish or chicken at once and then use the leftovers the next couple of days so you don't have to spend time cooking or grilling every day. Hope that helps.

Off Road
08-21-2010, 09:45 AM
What everybody is sayiong is, not preparing easy meals and relying too much on protein powders is not good for you and just plain lazy. Kind of goes against the whole "healthy" and "active" lifestyle we try to promote.

wags
08-21-2010, 01:53 PM
In that case, learning to diagnose problems with and fix your car should also be considered one of these skills. I've been working on cars since I was about 6 years old with my grandfather, so since I know about them and like working on them, everyone else should too.
I think you kind of missed the point and just got defensive instead of listening.

Americans have a tragically awful relationship with food. How many ailments and conditions can be traced back to our high-fat, high-carb, processed diets? Learning to cook (and not just 'make breakfast', any schmoe with a hotplate can make eggs) is merely the first step to fixing that relationship.

Mercuryblade
08-21-2010, 03:40 PM
Now what's really messed up is how lower calorie foods cost so much more than regular foods. Example, I bought 25 calorie diet hot chocolate last night. It was almost $3 for eight packets. Regular 150cal is $1 for 10 packets... It's cheaper to be fat in this country (I'm in the US)...

This is a common misconception by ALOT of people, so don't feel bad that you've fallen into it.
If you know how to shop correctly it's way less expensive to eat unprocessed foods, it also doesn't have to take a lot of your time to cook.

Here are some examples of cheap healthy foods:
Eggs
EGGS
Tuna
Peanut butter
Frozen chicken breasts in bulk
Lettuce (don't buy the bagged stuff it's expensive, buy a head of romaine, it's about $1.50 - $2.00 and takes about 2 minutes to wash and cut up)
Baby carrots
EGGS
Brown rice
Beans
Pasta

Alex.V
08-21-2010, 05:09 PM
I do hear ya. Still, I can find boneless skinless chicken breasts on special for $1.49-1.99 a pound, rice and pasta for the equivalent of a buck a day, cheap store brand yogurt for 30 cents a container...

It's all in where you look.

I eat what could be considered pretty damn healthy food and do it for the equivalent of a few bucks a day.

And cook. And am not exactly flush with free time either.

I just think frozen foods are a little overpriced for the calories and quality of nutrients you get.

mx597turbo
08-21-2010, 07:04 PM
I'm not trying to start a flame war only a couple of days after getting active on these forums. I appreciate everyone's opinion on cooking meals from scratch. I guess to each their own. If you like cooking, go for it. I will agree that it is (probably) healthier than frozen dinners and shakes. But I will counter and say that I think I am eating relatively healthy. Maybe some of my food is frozen and/or processed, but there is some that isn't.

At this point, I'm done with this thread. Again, thanks to all for your advise and suggestions.

Alex.V
08-21-2010, 08:24 PM
At this point, I'm done with this thread. Again, thanks to all for your advise and suggestions.

Don't blame you. It's the internet. It's Serious Business when people disagree.

Good luck with it all, mate.

Off Road
08-21-2010, 10:23 PM
http://www.wannabebig.com/forums/showthread.php?138321-Help-threads&p=2369142&viewfull=1#post2369142