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Bosch232
09-01-2010, 07:44 PM
What's the preferred width for hand position for bent over barbell rows?
Or does it matter much?

NickAus
09-01-2010, 07:57 PM
I Iike shoulder width personally, mix it up.

Parker 1995
09-01-2010, 07:58 PM
shoulder width or maybe a little bit closer is what i do.

mchicia1
09-01-2010, 08:06 PM
Same grip as bench press

JasonLift
09-01-2010, 08:34 PM
I mostly do them with my pinkies on the rings but sometimes I do them snatch grip. Never go too close as I just don't feel I get as much out of them. But I definitely feel it differently when I go from pinkies on ring to snatch grip.

tom183
09-01-2010, 11:40 PM
I prefer just wider than shoulder width.

fpr
09-02-2010, 06:48 AM
This is what I do:

pronated grip = about the same width as I bench, slightly wider than shoulderwidth
supinated grip = slightly narrower than shouldwidth

Pure Water
09-02-2010, 09:14 AM
I always do about shoulder width (just outside my legs).

lawndarts
09-02-2010, 10:08 AM
This is what I do:

pronated grip = about the same width as I bench, slightly wider than shoulderwidth
supinated grip = slightly narrower than shouldwidth

ditto

Tom Mutaffis
09-02-2010, 10:11 AM
I usually go a little bit wider than shoulder width, similar to bench press grip (someone else recommended this above).

Allen Cress
09-02-2010, 10:18 AM
What's the preferred width for hand position for bent over barbell rows?
Or does it matter much?

Whatever is a natural grip for you. The biggest thing I see people doing wrong with barbell rows is their technique. People always tend to bend over at a 45 degree angle or higher and this takes the back out of the plane of motion for maximum recruitment. yopu should be right at a 90 degree angle (parallel to the floor) with a flat back and sitting into your hamstrings for support (knees bent). As you row pull the bar towards the chest not the abdomen for even more muscle recruitment and as you go down reach toward yur toes to get a maximum stretch. A muscle stretched with resistance recieves the most overload. Also keep elbows at a soft lockout in the bottow position to keep the brachialias from taking over and keeping the tension on the back. Think about your arms from the elbow down as meat hooks just there to hold the weight.

The main reason people bend over only 45 degrees or higher is you can use more weight but you are taking away from your back. Also doing bent rows at a 45 degree angle with a reverse grip is dangerous as you place extreme tension on the bicep and could possibly strain or tear it. This is how Dorian Yates tore his.

Lift smarter, not always just heavier. Train your muscle not your ego.

greemah
09-02-2010, 02:57 PM
Whatever is a natural grip for you. The biggest thing I see people doing wrong with barbell rows is their technique. People always tend to bend over at a 45 degree angle or higher and this takes the back out of the plane of motion for maximum recruitment. yopu should be right at a 90 degree angle (parallel to the floor) with a flat back and sitting into your hamstrings for support (knees bent). As you row pull the bar towards the chest not the abdomen for even more muscle recruitment and as you go down reach toward yur toes to get a maximum stretch. A muscle stretched with resistance recieves the most overload. Also keep elbows at a soft lockout in the bottow position to keep the brachialias from taking over and keeping the tension on the back. Think about your arms from the elbow down as meat hooks just there to hold the weight.

The main reason people bend over only 45 degrees or higher is you can use more weight but you are taking away from your back. Also doing bent rows at a 45 degree angle with a reverse grip is dangerous as you place extreme tension on the bicep and could possibly strain or tear it. This is how Dorian Yates tore his.

Lift smarter, not always just heavier. Train your muscle not your ego.

Ah I always thought you were meant to lift to your hips/abdomen and not your chest. Does this apply to dumbell rows also?

I do dumbell rows as I find them much easier to keep body at 90 degrees as it's too easy to cheat with barbell rows

Allen Cress
09-02-2010, 03:10 PM
Ah I always thought you were meant to lift to your hips/abdomen and not your chest. Does this apply to dumbell rows also?

I do dumbell rows as I find them much easier to keep body at 90 degrees as it's too easy to cheat with barbell rows

It easy to cheat with any exercise its up to you not to. If you do DB rows you can row a bit more towards hips but rowing towards chest has greater recruitment

Bosch232
09-02-2010, 04:10 PM
Thanks for all the input. Especially Allen.

kmagnuss
09-02-2010, 04:22 PM
I'm definitely guilty of using too much weight, going about 45 degrees, and even rocking it up. And yes, it's all about the ego for the most part.... but my traps love it. :)

dynamo
09-02-2010, 06:31 PM
interesting...BB Row form adjustment in progress for me.

Raleighwood
09-03-2010, 08:17 AM
I really like pendlay rows... Each rep begins and ends on the floor. Much more explosive movement.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=44LJqZX5aIY&feature=related

I think this video was posted to youtube by one of the forum members here.

mchicia1
09-03-2010, 09:35 AM
Whatever is a natural grip for you. The biggest thing I see people doing wrong with barbell rows is their technique. People always tend to bend over at a 45 degree angle or higher and this takes the back out of the plane of motion for maximum recruitment. yopu should be right at a 90 degree angle (parallel to the floor) with a flat back and sitting into your hamstrings for support (knees bent). As you row pull the bar towards the chest not the abdomen for even more muscle recruitment and as you go down reach toward yur toes to get a maximum stretch. A muscle stretched with resistance recieves the most overload. Also keep elbows at a soft lockout in the bottow position to keep the brachialias from taking over and keeping the tension on the back. Think about your arms from the elbow down as meat hooks just there to hold the weight.

The main reason people bend over only 45 degrees or higher is you can use more weight but you are taking away from your back. Also doing bent rows at a 45 degree angle with a reverse grip is dangerous as you place extreme tension on the bicep and could possibly strain or tear it. This is how Dorian Yates tore his.

Lift smarter, not always just heavier. Train your muscle not your ego.

This is why I think pendlay rows are the way to go. You reset the weight each time which takes your legs and lower back out of the equation so you are only targetting what you need to target, and that is your middle->upper back.

Allen Cress
09-03-2010, 02:58 PM
The thing I don't like about Pendlay style is you take all the tension off the back and then when you do another rep the initial force is taken by the brachialis, not the back and you end up putting extra strain on your lower lumbar as well. When your in a set postion and have tension in the support system (hamstrings and low back) you will be less likey to strain then if you set the weight down between each rep because their is a tendancy to relax when the weight is on the floor.

Also For developement puposes their is no time under tension because you reset after each rep and you are not able to get the pre-stretch on the muscle before the concentric part of lift. A muscle stretched with resistance recieves the most overload.

As long as you train smart and row the weight and not throw it, regular barbell rows work best.

Bosch232
09-04-2010, 11:54 AM
I did upper body again this morning, and definitely had to adjust the weight when I went to 90 deg. That's a lot harder.

kmagnuss
09-04-2010, 03:57 PM
Lol... I strained a elbow/bicep tendon today doing rows. Awesome.

Behemoth
09-04-2010, 06:42 PM
There's nothing wrong with 45 degree rows. We use different planes of motion for our chest don't we people. It should simply be evaluated what your back goals are. Overall growth I agree stay low. But if you're looking for upper back and trap thickness at the expense of some lat activation then the only ego you need to leave at th e door is the holier-han-thou-form-nazi-ego and stand your ass up. Form and clean reps are important but just as the powerlifter does board presses to improve his sticking point so should the bodybuilder alter the movement to accommodate his weak points.

mchicia1
12-02-2010, 12:01 PM
The thing I don't like about Pendlay style is you take all the tension off the back and then when you do another rep the initial force is taken by the brachialis, not the back and you end up putting extra strain on your lower lumbar as well. When your in a set postion and have tension in the support system (hamstrings and low back) you will be less likey to strain then if you set the weight down between each rep because their is a tendancy to relax when the weight is on the floor.

Also For developement puposes their is no time under tension because you reset after each rep and you are not able to get the pre-stretch on the muscle before the concentric part of lift. A muscle stretched with resistance recieves the most overload.

As long as you train smart and row the weight and not throw it, regular barbell rows work best.

Old thread but figured id add this...

I like Pendlay rows because it keeps the stress off my lower back. However, I see what you are saying about doing a soft lockout vs completely locking out. I definitely feel the initial pull with my arms and not my back. My solution for this, to get the best of both worlds, is to put the weight on platforms. So if I need to set the weight down to take the tension off my lower back, I can initiate the pull with my back now as opposed to my arms.

NordicMan
12-02-2010, 04:00 PM
Thank you for a real sensible and helpful series of posts. I used to row to my belly, which seemed to work for the time, when I could really feel the latissimus working. But I switched to doing less weight, back at 90' angle, or shall one say torso parallel with the floor, knees bent, supported by the hamstrings, and then rowing with to the upper chest. It has taken me time, but it seems to be working well. I have some lumber elbow, or tennis elbow, so I have had to proceed slowly, but I like these thoughts you have uttered here. It is easy to work the arms too hard, so I have tried to relax the arm muscles by the elbows, and sought to work the back muscles, not squeezing the life out of the bar, but like hooks holding the bar.




Whatever is a natural grip for you. The biggest thing I see people doing wrong with barbell rows is their technique. People always tend to bend over at a 45 degree angle or higher and this takes the back out of the plane of motion for maximum recruitment. yopu should be right at a 90 degree angle (parallel to the floor) with a flat back and sitting into your hamstrings for support (knees bent). As you row pull the bar towards the chest not the abdomen for even more muscle recruitment and as you go down reach toward yur toes to get a maximum stretch. A muscle stretched with resistance recieves the most overload. Also keep elbows at a soft lockout in the bottow position to keep the brachialias from taking over and keeping the tension on the back. Think about your arms from the elbow down as meat hooks just there to hold the weight.

The main reason people bend over only 45 degrees or higher is you can use more weight but you are taking away from your back. Also doing bent rows at a 45 degree angle with a reverse grip is dangerous as you place extreme tension on the bicep and could possibly strain or tear it. This is how Dorian Yates tore his.

Lift smarter, not always just heavier. Train your muscle not your ego.