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jtteg_x
09-16-2010, 10:58 PM
Is this something a certified bench shirt manufacture has to do or can any tailor shop using heavy duty material stitch sleeves together and workout fine? Does it matter which section of the sleeves get pinched to tighten it? its a single ply super katana if it matters.

gal 1
09-17-2010, 12:36 AM
i think if you want it to work properle ' you sold sent it bak to titan compene ' they cen help you .

NickAus
09-17-2010, 01:34 AM
I have done mine myself with no problems.

Just remember when you take them in a small amount will tighten them more than you think.

Travis Bell
09-17-2010, 05:56 AM
I've taken a couple to a local shoe upholstry shop and it's worked out well.

You need to take it in at the original seam, otherwise you'll end up with multiple seams in the same sleeve which is asking for a blow out.

drew
09-17-2010, 06:23 AM
What Travis said or bring it to a good tailor.

Or you could do what Tee Tee would recommend, hammer curls.

douglasoh5
09-17-2010, 09:59 AM
Doesnt titan offer one free alteration on all gear?

theBarzeen
09-17-2010, 05:29 PM
Just run a few straight stitches up the sleeve...... go buy a spool of nylon bonded #69 thread and find a shoe repair place who will run a stitch for you....... that or do what I did and go buy an old machine like a 31-15 Singer for around $100 and never have to trust someone else's alterations again

jtteg_x
09-18-2010, 02:02 AM
About how many cm should i get it folded in? I can literally pull the sleeves past my elbow myself.

NickAus
09-18-2010, 04:10 AM
About how many cm should i get it folded in? I can literally pull the sleeves past my elbow myself.

Just put the shirt on and pinch it to see how much you need.

martin
09-18-2010, 06:08 AM
Anyone tried to alter a Metal Ace themselves?

NickAus
09-18-2010, 06:28 AM
Anyone tried to alter a Metal Ace themselves?

No, but I run a few layers of duct tape around the sleeves (when inside out) to tighten them up some.

Worked very well.

theBarzeen
09-18-2010, 04:21 PM
Anyone tried to alter a Metal Ace themselves?


I've worked on my old ACE briefs....... They are easy to work with because the material is laminated. It also won't fray because of the lamination so a straight stitch is just fine. No zig-zag needed.

Again, go get a cheap, old, industrial machine and just start working on everything yourself. There's not much to it. The average straight stitch machine's foot is 1/4 inch. If you run the foot up the original seam the 1/4" offset takes in the seam 1/2" ( because the material is doubled over) Use #69 Nylon bonded thread and a #18 needle...... the whole set up with needles and several spools of thread ran me around $100......
Even with Rudy only 2 towns over I still do most of my own alterations. Because I can alter my gear however I need when my weight fluctuates or needs repair everything's always dialed in

Dammsilly
09-18-2010, 04:30 PM
Just run a few straight stitches up the sleeve...... go buy a spool of nylon bonded #69 thread and find a shoe repair place who will run a stitch for you....... that or do what I did and go buy an old machine like a 31-15 Singer for around $100 and never have to trust someone else's alterations again

I take in shirts exactly like this with a high quality home sewing machine. Anyone with a machine can do it, so if you know someone who sews you might be able to get them to do it for you. Like theBarzeen said, use the right thread, I use Coats and Clark Outdoor thread, as it had more give than the #69, so a home machine gets along with it a little better than the #69. Make sure you use the appropriate needle for the thread size (usually a #16) or the hole of the needle will shear the thread as it passes through.

Turn your shirt inside out and draw the exact line you want sewn on. I use dressmakers chalk, but use whatever you have that will draw a precise line. ALWAYS start the new seam on the existing seam and angle to the desired new seam location from there. If you don't do that the start of the seam will be too stressed when you use the shirt. Take the shirt to your seamstress and tell them exactly where you want it sewn. A straight stitch will work just fine for a shirt like that.

If you're taking it in a lot you might want to spend the money to ask them to remove the hem, stitch up the sleeve to the new size, straighten up the hem (the hem on the Katana is angled and will not line up after alteration), then rehem. This is really only necessary if you've taken in a lot on the sleeve. Otherwise just tell them to take it in as close to the hem as possible and you can deal with the little bulge that ends up by the hem.