PDA

View Full Version : yoga and flexibility



platypus
10-18-2010, 02:16 AM
I'm not sure if this is the right section...

I'm looking for a simple yoga routine to do in the mornings/night to improve flexibility, improve recovery, and for relaxation. I don't have the money to take a class, so I'm just looking for something to learn on my own. If anyone has any good resources, please let me know. Thanks :)

Mercuryblade
10-18-2010, 04:53 PM
I'm not sure if this is the right section...

I'm looking for a simple yoga routine to do in the mornings/night to improve flexibility, improve recovery, and for relaxation. I don't have the money to take a class, so I'm just looking for something to learn on my own. If anyone has any good resources, please let me know. Thanks :)

Yoga is good for psychological reasons and as a supplementary physical activity outside the weightroom. You don't need yoga to learn how to stretch, and I have never seen any convincing literature to suggest that yoga will help recovery.

If you have cable with on-demand services, there are probably yoga workouts under the exercise section, or you can netflix some videos.

platypus
10-18-2010, 10:38 PM
yeah i like it for the relaxation, but if it kills a few birds with the same stone, i may as well do it for the flexibility as well. and i find it hard to believe that increasing flexibility wouldnt translate to better gains in the weightroom as well. i dont have anything yoga related on tv.

for some reason im finding it hard to find a simple routine on the internet.

LanceGoyke
11-12-2010, 07:45 AM
I suggest you take a class to get the idea, then you can try it on your own.

You could do a dynamic mobility circuit instead.

And don't just go static stretch blindly. Everyone does hamstring stretches, but the truth is that hardly anybody needs to static stretch their hamstrings!

Sensei
11-12-2010, 04:27 PM
To the OP,
There are plenty of decent yoga DVDs out there. Just choose one and try it for a while. If you don't like it, look elsewhere - there a bazillion mobility programs out there these days both online for free and for sale.


Everyone does hamstring stretches, but the truth is that hardly anybody needs to static stretch their hamstrings!I totally disagree with this. It's certainly not a cure-all, but most people sit for hours and hours everyday in static hamstring flexion - they would do well to spend a few minutes stretching.

...and folks, if something helps with relaxation, it probably helps with recovery.

LanceGoyke
11-12-2010, 07:26 PM
To the OP,
There are plenty of decent yoga DVDs out there. Just choose one and try it for a while. If you don't like it, look elsewhere - there a bazillion mobility programs out there these days both online for free and for sale.

I totally disagree with this. It's certainly not a cure-all, but most people sit for hours and hours everyday in static hamstring flexion - they would do well to spend a few minutes stretching.

...and folks, if something helps with relaxation, it probably helps with recovery.

I see your logic in it. But when sitting, since the hips are flexed, you're also lengthening the hamstrings (since they act over two joints, not solely the knee), so ultimately the change in length is minimal. Hell, if you sit down and throw your legs up on something, it's being stretched at both joints.

What we find is that the hip flexors are the real culprits of stiff and short soft tissue adaptation, contributing to the ever-popular anterior pelvic tilt. So that's why your argument, although making logical sense, does not usually pertain to human movement.

Almost everyone who tells you they have tight hamstrings actually has physiologic problems (anterior weight bearing a.k.a. on your toes) and not structural problems (short or stiff hamstrings). You can test this by laying someone down on their back on a table: if you can raise their straight leg up to ~80-90 degrees, then they are not short.

Now, if someone is sitting all day, getting up and moving around is good, but it's more necessary to activate the hamstrings (and glutes) and lengthen the hip flexors (rectus femoris, TFL).

And on another note, fast and/or strong athletes will often have stiff (not short) hamstrings because they can use the recoil for speed and power development.

Sensei
11-13-2010, 09:43 AM
I see your logic in it. But when sitting, since the hips are flexed, you're also lengthening the hamstrings (since they act over two joints, not solely the knee), so ultimately the change in length is minimal. Hell, if you sit down and throw your legs up on something, it's being stretched at both joints.No, it's not. Most people flex at the spine and minimize hip flexion when seated.


What we find is that the hip flexors are the real culprits of stiff and short soft tissue adaptation, contributing to the ever-popular anterior pelvic tilt. So that's why your argument, although making logical sense, does not usually pertain to human movement.When you say "we", who are you talking about? Are you working with a team, or do you mean what you've read?

Yes, the hip flexors are typically short and weak - never said they weren't. They're certainly relevant, but that doesn't make my points invalid.
Almost everyone who tells you they have tight hamstrings actually has physiologic problems (anterior weight bearing a.k.a. on your toes) and not structural problems (short or stiff hamstrings). You can test this by laying someone down on their back on a table: if you can raise their straight leg up to ~80-90 degrees, then they are not short.An active lying leg raise - fine. Apparently the populations you work with are different than mine because there are plenty that show limitations in hip flexion/leg extension with this assessment. Hamstring inflexibility is certainly a component here.


Now, if someone is sitting all day, getting up and moving around is good, but it's more necessary to activate the hamstrings (and glutes) and lengthen the hip flexors (rectus femoris, TFL).

And on another note, fast and/or strong athletes will often have stiff (not short) hamstrings because they can use the recoil for speed and power development. (edit - forgot to respond here)Activation - of course. Stretching is, as much as anything, a proprioception drill. The problem w. the current "anti-stretching" camps of mobility specialists is that they've thrown the baby out w. the bath water. I would argue that sprinters would benefit from static stretches as much as anyone. No, not as a part of warm-up necessarily (unless it's prior to a sport-specific warm-up), but as a part of larger recovery and prehab protocol.

LanceGoyke
11-13-2010, 12:41 PM
No, it's not. Most people flex at the spine and minimize hip flexion when seated.

When you say "we", who are you talking about? Are you working with a team, or do you mean what you've read?

Yes, the hip flexors are typically short and weak - never said they weren't. They're certainly relevant, but that doesn't make my points invalid.An active lying leg raise - fine. Apparently the populations you work with are different than mine because there are plenty that show limitations in hip flexion/leg extension with this assessment. Hamstring inflexibility is certainly a component here.

(edit - forgot to respond here)Activation - of course. Stretching is, as much as anything, a proprioception drill. The problem w. the current "anti-stretching" camps of mobility specialists is that they've thrown the baby out w. the bath water. I would argue that sprinters would benefit from static stretches as much as anyone. No, not as a part of warm-up necessarily (unless it's prior to a sport-specific warm-up), but as a part of larger recovery and prehab protocol.
I agree with your "spinal flexion when sitting" point, and while that minimizes hip flexion, it does not eliminate it.

Sorry about that: "we" pertains to humans.

It is not an ACTIVE straight leg raise. It's a PASSIVE straight leg raise. If they can't raise their leg up on their own, there's a good chance their hip flexors are weak. If you compare the passive to the active straight leg raise, and the active is less, it's hip flexor weakness.

As long as you wouldn't static stretch a sprinter's hamstrings BEFORE they workout, then I think I can see what you're saying about prehab: benefitting them in the long run, but not their performance? I don't know if this is where you were taking it, but then you have to ask the question, "Why would I want a perfect bodyweight squat when I could have a perfect 500 pound squat?"

Could you explain the "proprioception drill" thing? I'm not sure I'm following it.
Do you use stretching for recovery purposes?

Sensei
11-13-2010, 06:08 PM
I see your logic in it. But when sitting, since the hips are flexed, you're also lengthening the hamstrings (since they act over two joints, not solely the knee), so ultimately the change in length is minimal. Hell, if you sit down and throw your legs up on something, it's being stretched at both joints.


I agree with your "spinal flexion when sitting" point, and while that minimizes hip flexion, it does not eliminate it.Lance,
You're totally missing the point. If the lower back is not in extension, then hip musculature is out of the equation - you are not stretching the hamstrings or the glutes at all (minimally AT BEST).


Sorry about that: "we" pertains to humans.

It is not an ACTIVE straight leg raise. It's a PASSIVE straight leg raise. If they can't raise their leg up on their own, there's a good chance their hip flexors are weak. If you compare the passive to the active straight leg raise, and the active is less, it's hip flexor weakness.You're wrong - yes, it could be weak hip flexors, but it could also be inflexible hamstrings and/or a hip disfunction.


As long as you wouldn't static stretch a sprinter's hamstrings BEFORE they workout, then I think I can see what you're saying about prehab: benefitting them in the long run, but not their performance? I don't know if this is where you were taking it, but then you have to ask the question, "Why would I want a perfect bodyweight squat when I could have a perfect 500 pound squat?"Lance, you have lost me here.


Could you explain the "proprioception drill" thing? I'm not sure I'm following it.
Do you use stretching for recovery purposes?I don't know how I can explain it any more than to say that stretching can be a proprioception drill if you choose to use it as such.

Yes, I/we (clients/athletes I work) use stretching for recovery purposes.