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thewicked
11-06-2010, 05:58 PM
benching full range once a week and hitting the shoulders then on a second day doing HEAVY lockout work ( top 1/3 of the movement) on a second day with triceps...

good or bad idea?

Sean S
11-06-2010, 07:06 PM
For me I've always only been able to handle one heavy pressing session a week, so I consolidate all heavy benching and lockout work on one day. When I tried to split it up and do heavy benching one day and heavy lockout work on another day in the same week, I would get beat up and stop making progress. It's essentially doing two heavy days a week for benching. I've heard of people have success both ways, so I don't know if there will be a clear consensus one way or another.

theBarzeen
11-06-2010, 08:43 PM
Depending on how beat up I'm feeling I can sometimes train like that. For me, after a while my shoulders start popping and hurting so I have to back off...... you could always give it a shot for a few weeks and see how your body responds.

NickAus
11-07-2010, 02:54 AM
2 heavy pressing days is prob fine as a bench only, but as you are not and you do a lot of other work I think it will just stall your progress.

You should try it as it may work for you but I dont think it will unless you cut back on something.

ScottYard
11-07-2010, 04:39 AM
Im all about rest. I llike to have one heavy day then 7 rest of days. To me one good day is better then 2 descent days.

muscle_g
11-07-2010, 09:20 AM
Im all about rest. I llike to have one heavy day then 7 rest of days. To me one good day is better then 2 descent days.

I'm with Scott on this.

LanceGoyke
11-07-2010, 10:29 AM
You'll need to make sure you're varying the volume and intensity week to week as to incorporate an effective deload week.

It's entirely possible to be effective, just don't think you'll hit a PR every week.

I've personally found that after about 3 months of this, my elbows have had enough and I really need to cut the pressing. You're probably more resilient than I, though.

mastermonster
11-07-2010, 12:30 PM
I'm with Scott on this.

Me too. I'll add this from my own experience. Personally I think that if a training program is not overtraining you, and the work load is ideal for you; a deload day is not neccessary. Just my opinion and I know many will disagree. But I think if you actually feel the need for a deload day, what you're doing is over training. I think programs with a 'built in' deload day have it in there as a 'just in case' clause. Just in case this program is overtraining you.

JK1
11-08-2010, 12:48 AM
Me too. I'll add this from my own experience. Personally I think that if a training program is not overtraining you, and the work load is ideal for you; a deload day is not neccessary. Just my opinion and I know many will disagree. But I think if you actually feel the need for a deload day, what you're doing is over training. I think programs with a 'built in' deload day have it in there as a 'just in case' clause. Just in case this program is overtraining you.

I don't know about that... I tend to do planned deloads every 4th week heading into a meet. What I find myself doing is absolutely blasting myself on the ME Squat/deadlift workout the week before the deload. I think because I know I'll have that bit of rest. then on the monday after the deload (my ME bench day) I almost always set a solid PR. Again I think its because I'm coming off of down week. I've pushed my numbers up consistantly with that approach.


Personally, I tend to bench heavy with partial range (ie heavy board work) RAW after my DE bench and I tend to bench heavy in some form on My ME day, so I guess you could say I'm pressing heavy twice a week. What I don't tend to do heading into a meet is a lot of heavy overhead pressing. If I do that, by the time I'm 3 weeks out, my shoulders are killing me they hurt so bad. If I press overhead, I drop one of the other two workouts.

My wife isn't as experienced of a lifter as I am and she proportionately doesn't handle the same level of weights, but she on the other hand, seems to see her bench go down if she drops her military work before a meet. I"m not sure why that is, but I think part of it is individual body proportions. I've got short arms and a big arch vs her relatively flat arch and ridiculously long arms.

vdizenzo
11-08-2010, 05:42 AM
Sometimes I have been able to handle this and sometimes not. Usually about a month into a training cycle I can tell. If you are going to try it make sure you are icing your shoulders after each session. That will greatly improve your chances of success. If you have never done this type of split before, give it some time. You will probably feel pretty beat up right away. You need to give your body a chance to get used to the volume.

slashkills
11-08-2010, 06:41 PM
Personally, I tend to bench heavy with partial range (ie heavy board work) RAW after my DE bench and I tend to bench heavy in some form on My ME day, so I guess you could say I'm pressing heavy twice a week. What I don't tend to do heading into a meet is a lot of heavy overhead pressing. If I do that, by the time I'm 3 weeks out, my shoulders are killing me they hurt so bad. If I press overhead, I drop one of the other two workouts.




what kind of rep ranges and at what percent of your max are you generally using after DE bench?