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Dan Fanelli
12-08-2010, 01:05 PM
Has anyone effectively replaced the majority of their accessory work with sandbag training? I'm thinking of getting a good set of sandbags in January.

I was thinking they'd be a good move to make in strengthening my grip, upper back, and "core", but there are obviously certain things they aren't good for.

And, if I were to replace a large amount of my accessory work with sandbag training, which day would be best ME, or DE?

And what movements besides ME and DE bench/squat/deadlift would need to be left in the program?

NickAus
12-08-2010, 01:23 PM
Good for upperback, shoulders and grip.

You need other movements as a powerlifter.

I would just use them for some upperback work.

Dan Fanelli
12-08-2010, 04:04 PM
Ya Nick, I think you are right. While it seems like a great tool to account for areas that are lagging from barbells/dumbells, it may be limited just because of the amount of weight and movements involved.

I'd still like to give it a try, as my grip, and back need more work. And since I wont be able to do sandbag stuff in the gym, it will probably need its own day. I might start by replacing my DE lower days with sandbag stuff. Maybe if I get adjustable bags, I can still work on speed stuff like tosses, but then up the weight a bit and get in some cleans, loading, and carries.

Thanks for steering me in the right direction.

Hazerboy
12-08-2010, 04:44 PM
I think they're best for GPP. You can't get as specific with which muscle groups you're hitting (which is a pro if you're doing GPP) or make linear progress as well (how do you add 5 lbs?). I've made adjustable bags by putting a bunch of tinier bags inside a larger bag, and is always a pain in the ass. They break inside the larger back from all throwing/tossing around. After awhile even my bigger bag would start to leak sand.

They're awesome for powercleans or carrying around or whatever. An uphill, 100lb sandbag carry is very humbling.

Tom Mutaffis
12-09-2010, 06:53 AM
Has anyone effectively replaced the majority of their accessory work with sandbag training? I'm thinking of getting a good set of sandbags in January.

I was thinking they'd be a good move to make in strengthening my grip, upper back, and "core", but there are obviously certain things they aren't good for.

And, if I were to replace a large amount of my accessory work with sandbag training, which day would be best ME, or DE?

And what movements besides ME and DE bench/squat/deadlift would need to be left in the program?

If your primary goal is to improve powerlifting performance then I would use sandbag training for GPP/Conditioning but would not use it to replace your accessory work.

Dan Fanelli
12-09-2010, 01:25 PM
If your primary goal is to improve powerlifting performance then I would use sandbag training for GPP/Conditioning but would not use it to replace your accessory work.

What if one weren't a powerlifter, but instead was just trying to get big and strong?


Also, maybe a better question might be, what is NECESSARY and what could afford to be substituted out?

Im not that experienced with this, but im thinking the necessary stuff might be: ME work, and supplemental work. The DE work might not need to be trained weekly, and there are a ton of ways to get in the accessory work for different purposes.

But even then, I still think the simple answer for me, might be putting this stuff in on DE lower days. My speed on lower movements is already pretty good, and i'd basically be replacing some GM's and deadlifts with stuff that builds up the same muscle groups.

I'd also like to be able to train farmer's walks more seriously, but dont know if thats a possibility as far as equipment goes.

If I wanted to go two days per week with the sandbag type stuff though, then I think it might be a bit trickier to program it. I would maybe have to condense ME lower with DE upper into one day, or add another training day.

I guess these are all things to think about.

NickAus
12-09-2010, 01:57 PM
Everyone powerlifter I know has put on plenty of muscle over the years with-out sandbags..........and they really can not replace G.Ms and deads etc.

theBarzeen
12-09-2010, 08:59 PM
I agree with the above posters that sandbag training really won't REPLACE much auxiliary work, but it is a great addition to your routine....

between a more than full time job, and grad classes in the evenings I can only get to the gym 3 or 4 days a week...... Sat is always my heavy squat and deadlift day, Tuesday I always bench, Sunday is my auxiliary and conditioning day...... sometimes I'll get a speed day in on a wed, but I usually have stuff for school.

My sunday workouts are usually a mix of strongman events followed by some rotator cuff work and some auxiliary work ( if I'm not benching heavy that week)

The strongman stuff ( like sandbag training) has really helped my conditioning, grip, and I feel like it aids in recovery from my saturday session ( as long as it's not super heavy)


go for it

Dan Fanelli
12-13-2010, 07:40 PM
I agree with the above posters that sandbag training really won't REPLACE much auxiliary work, but it is a great addition to your routine....

between a more than full time job, and grad classes in the evenings I can only get to the gym 3 or 4 days a week...... Sat is always my heavy squat and deadlift day, Tuesday I always bench, Sunday is my auxiliary and conditioning day...... sometimes I'll get a speed day in on a wed, but I usually have stuff for school.

My sunday workouts are usually a mix of strongman events followed by some rotator cuff work and some auxiliary work ( if I'm not benching heavy that week)

The strongman stuff ( like sandbag training) has really helped my conditioning, grip, and I feel like it aids in recovery from my saturday session ( as long as it's not super heavy)


go for it

Hey man, thanks for replying.. Im still a bit torn on this one. I have experimented with a minimal amount of strongman type stuff in the past, but it was always kept fairly light and more for recovery purposes. At the moment im bulking and pretty much just eating everything in sight and my recovery and work capacity has shot through the roof.

The thing is, im not a competative powerlifter, and my goals are a bit more general. My current goal is to be "strong", and the 400/300/500 is what im shooting for. So maybe my goals aren't that different than if I were a competative powerlifter.

But I may make a compromise here. I'll probalby get the adjustable sandbags and start out fairly light using it as additional work/gpp on my off day(s). Then after a month or two, i'll see if going heavier and putting more focus on the strongman stuff could benefit me, or if I should just leave it.

My deadlift is where im going to be struggling the most, and its grip and posterior chain that needs the most work.... But, I also haven't been deadlifting that frequently, so i'll begin by practicing more, and go from there.

Thanks again for your input, i'll keep you guys updated with how things go as they progress.

Wlfdg
12-19-2010, 10:31 PM
I've been training with sandbags consistently since summer.
Something I don't think was mentioned is acceleration. Heavy sandbag shouldering really forces you to accelerate hard do to the sand falling away from you. I like this as it allows me to get good stimulation with lighter loads. Easier on the joints.

Sandbags are GREAT for core work. TGU's with a 125# sandbag on your shoulder, throw in a lumberjack press to alternate sides. Pretty good conditioning and there has to be an advantage to loading directly on the body.

I like to do pushups with a heavy bag on my back. I incorporate this into my girlfriend workout. She deadlifts it on to my back

My rotator cuffs went through about 3 weeks of serious DOMS went I first started training with them.

Stabilizing a heavy sandbag doing floor presses has got to have some carryover.

I train EDT style with them. They allow me to train with more frequency.

You will get stronger using them. Just from the increase in grip strength.

Dan Fanelli
12-20-2010, 12:10 AM
I've been training with sandbags consistently since summer.
Something I don't think was mentioned is acceleration. Heavy sandbag shouldering really forces you to accelerate hard do to the sand falling away from you. I like this as it allows me to get good stimulation with lighter loads. Easier on the joints.

Sandbags are GREAT for core work. TGU's with a 125# sandbag on your shoulder, throw in a lumberjack press to alternate sides. Pretty good conditioning and there has to be an advantage to loading directly on the body.

I like to do pushups with a heavy bag on my back. I incorporate this into my girlfriend workout. She deadlifts it on to my back

My rotator cuffs went through about 3 weeks of serious DOMS went I first started training with them.

Stabilizing a heavy sandbag doing floor presses has got to have some carryover.

I train EDT style with them. They allow me to train with more frequency.

You will get stronger using them. Just from the increase in grip strength.

Cool man, im gonna get them going after Christmas.

Do you use adjustable ones, or different set weight ones? Also, did you just make yours, or buy them from somewhere like elitefts or ironmind?

Dan Fanelli
01-03-2011, 10:30 PM
Hey guys, here is our first sandbag workout with the heavier bag I got going. It was much harder than I thought it would be, but im looking forward to adding weight to this thing after 80lbs gets easy.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3C1dslMwO30

JK1
01-03-2011, 10:49 PM
I think they have their place in powerlifting---not only for GPP but also for rehab work for certian injuries. I did quite a bit of sandbag work (dragging, cleans, picking up the bag, swings, etc) after I broke my left ankle a few years back and incorporated using them into rehab after I tore my left calf 2 years ago. .