PDA

View Full Version : Age and powerlifting



vdizenzo
12-08-2010, 08:15 PM
I'm curious to see what you all think on this. At what age do you think strength tops out? I'm not sure whether I'm still climbing up the hill or heading back down at 41.

Guido
12-08-2010, 09:01 PM
I know of guys who are still getting stronger into their late 40's and even early 50's. I think it just depends on a lot of factors, though.

Athos
12-08-2010, 09:03 PM
This is something I think about often.... To an extent, I would guess some of it depends on the individual. However, if RUM was any indication, there is much to look forward to! Look at Ricks and Conyers, these guys are in their 50's, putting up mind-boggling numbers. Personally, I feel I'm better at 35 than I was at 25, but some of that is probably heeding "lessons learned" over the years. I just hope to have the longevity of those guys. But to answer the question based on people I've known, for the normal lifter, I'm going to guess on average, the peak is somewhere between 40 and 45.

Songsangnim
12-08-2010, 09:06 PM
I know of guys who are still getting stronger into their late 40's and even early 50's. I think it just depends on a lot of factors, though.


Agreed. Though it is possible to be very strong even past that.

http://www.biggerfasterstronger.com/uploads2/93Spring_IronGame.pdf

According to the above link Karl Norberg was the oldest man to bench over 400 lbs. At age 74 he benched 465 with a narrow grip and legs held out in front of him. And reportedly according to another source he started training in later life.

So if anyone can't do that but is close...maybe that's something to shoot for....not necessarily when they are 74 but within the next few years.

NickAus
12-08-2010, 09:31 PM
Seems to me 45 is about the peak, it would depend of course on many many factors.

john o
12-08-2010, 09:36 PM
Good points all. From a strictly hormonal standpoint testosterone production decreases very early. Somewhere in the 20's if I recall correctly. It takes years to build muscles up and master the techniques of the lift. Almost everyone who has trained for strength consistently has seen strength increases even as their testosterone production decreases. As said, it's likely highly individual. Strength is the last thing to go. Flexibility, speed, and recovery come first. Injury history is a big deal as well. Powerlifting is tough on the body; young and old. An older lifter usually has to deal with physical limitations that have accrued over many years. Also, the decreased flexibilty changes the ROM around the joint. This can affect power as well. If I could change one thing in my training past it would be to properly rest injuries rather than battle through them. I'm talking about true injuries, not minor aches and pains. One things for sure, the best way to get stronger is to move progressively heavier stuff.

M.T. Neal
12-09-2010, 03:19 AM
I think I can still get stronger, almost 42 now. Fighting injuries hampers us but I think we can keep getting stronger into our mid 40s or close to 50.

Ryano
12-09-2010, 05:37 AM
I'm "bench only", but just hit an all time PR for me at WABDL Worlds. 755 at 55 years old, just missing 771. I'm sure that advances in gear is helping, but I still feel stronger than ever. I honestly don't know what my raw max is, but it's more than when I was in my 40's. While at WABDL Worlds, I talked to Randy Patterson. Randy was the first person over 50 to bench 700. Randy, in his 60's now, no longer lifts heavy or competes due to health reasons but said he hit his highest bench when he was 58. That's good news for me, as I continue the quest for 800+.

I think the key is to listen to your body and train smart. Recovery is slower, rest more and ice more. I still train 4 days a week, two bench days, leg day, & back day. But the only real heavy lifting is on ME bench day. I'm sure that anyone lifting/training for full power will beat themselves up much more than I do. If I'm too sore from a previous workout, I'll either cut back volume or skip a workout all together. As others have said, I also think it's an individual thing.

Magilla
12-09-2010, 05:55 AM
I'm just a garage lifter with the occasional meet, but I didn't bench 400 till I was 40, I am 44 now and can hit 455 (raw). I think I am still getting stronger! Lotta that gain though is due to training smarter.

One thing I have notice is after a heavy squat or deadlift day, it takes a while to recoup.

Off Road
12-09-2010, 07:16 AM
I'm no powerlifter and not anywhere near some of your guys' numbers, but I am 47 years old and still getting stronger. I think some of it has to do with how close you are to your potential, and like others mentioned, you have to train smarter.

j robinson
12-09-2010, 08:21 AM
I am a bench only guy who didn't do my first contest until I was 38. In 5 years I have put about 350 lb on my shirted bench and just hit a PR of 845. I have always felt that because I started competitively benching at a later age that my body was better prepared to handle the heavier weight. Like many masters lifters I had worked out for 20+ years before I started competing. So does the age when you start affect how you gain strength as you get older or is it just one of many contributing factors?

vdizenzo
12-09-2010, 09:12 AM
I am a bench only guy who didn't do my first contest until I was 38. In 5 years I have put about 350 lb on my shirted bench and just hit a PR of 845. I have always felt that because I started competitively benching at a later age that my body was better prepared to handle the heavier weight. Like many masters lifters I had worked out for 20+ years before I started competing. So does the age when you start affect how you gain strength as you get older or is it just one of many contributing factors?

Wow, 845, that's great! Was that done in a meet and at what bodyweight?

j robinson
12-09-2010, 09:46 AM
It was done at the UPA Full Metal Mayhem on November 13 in Piedemont SC. I lifted in the SHW tested division and weighed in at a light 350. Probably my best day ever. I went 775-805-845. Robchris was my back spotter so I owe it all to him.

BigTallOx
12-09-2010, 11:43 AM
Seems to me 45 is about the peak, it would depend of course on many many factors.

Oh man, shoot, I turned 45 4 days ago, don't tell me it's all downhill now.

Actually I think the turning point depends a lot on when you started strength training. I didn't get serious about it until 2 years or so ago, well and then not serious about strongman until June 2010, I know I've got a long ways to go before my strength levels peak. But it'd probably be quit a bit different if I had been doing strongman for 10 years already.

Kiff
12-09-2010, 12:21 PM
I am only 19 but i hope i can reach some of the numbers in this post even if it takes me till i am 55 :)

Seems people are leaning towards starting later being a good thing? Do you think that is because you are less injured and have ruined your joints less or is it as OR suggested that you are going to be further off your genetic potential that you 'feel' you are doing great.

If you had trained for years you may not be making the progress as well but do you think your numbers would be higher?

Chris Smith
12-09-2010, 01:17 PM
Vincent, I am turning 43 in January. Seems like PR's are alot harder to come by these days. I have wondered the same thing many times, if I have hit my peak and on a downward slide. I dont know about you, but for me, when I realize that downhill slide is here, I am probably done competing. I still lift in open class, and cant bring myself to check the box for the "Masters" division. lol. I have given myself an unofficial timetable to attain some goals, which is the age of 45. When that hits, it's time to sit down and make some decisions. Until then, it balls to the wall. I just have to figure out what my goals will be after competing, which will probably be dropping some pounds, focus more on mobility/flexibility, etc. I have a 6 year old boy that I need to turn in to a machine when he gets older. But I think if we can stay healthy, and injury free, the sky is the limit--Like Ryano . He is kicking ass well in to his 50's.


Smitty

jtteg_x
12-09-2010, 02:18 PM
One of my training partners is in his mid 50's and has been competing during his 20's. He was at his prime until he hit the age 50 barrier and started experiencing health issues (shoulder, heart, blood, just general health). He competed mainly as SHW and that plays a lot into. At 41, I truly believe you still have it in you (Dizenzo) because you train smart.

barbell01
12-09-2010, 03:47 PM
one of my training partners just turned 47. he continues to get stronger. at 179lbs bw i have seen him easily bench 420 raw. he is currently ranked #3 in multi ply bench at 181 and he will surpass that the next meet he does this winter.

barbell01
12-09-2010, 03:50 PM
one of my training partners just turned 47. he continues to get stronger. at 179lbs bw i have seen him easily bench 420 raw. he is currently ranked #3 in multi ply bench at 181 and he will surpass that the next meet he does this winter.

i will also add that he has been competing for a very long time so its not just noob gains

UncleAl
12-09-2010, 05:51 PM
At 41, you're just a pup, Vince! We Italians don't peak out 'til we're in our 80's....Oh wait, that's sexually.

As a general rule, I'd say late 40s. There are so many top rated lifters in their early to mid 40s, it's almost like guys under 45 should be in the open, rather than masters division. Of course, as Athos pointed out, there are also phenoms, like Conyers, Ricks, and Bridges, who are still among the best of the best into their 50's...and what about Gaynor, who at 64 pulled 680 (raw) in the 198s last June?!!!!

rinse
12-09-2010, 08:19 PM
Well one of my training partners hit an all time PR in the deadlift at 61. He started lifting around 35 and has had a 7 years break in between. But when we started training togerther and trained for the same meets he started getting pretty good gains. He deadlifted 639 at the 09 WPC worlds at 215 lbs at 61 years old. He's as strong raw in bench now as ever and same with the squat.

theBarzeen
12-09-2010, 08:50 PM
At 26 I can't offer much here from personal experience.... but every week I watch Ernie Frantz still squatting around 500 at around 200lbs bodyweight in a loose suit...... literally he takes his suit off easier than I can get out of a pair of jeans..... the guy turned 76 this year. He always talks about how he did his best lifting in his late 50's....

Have a few really strong guys on the team in their 50's ( one ~700lb squatter in his 60's)...... this has always seemed to me like a sport that you can do well in to the AARP years.......

ThomasG
12-10-2010, 11:44 AM
Well I definitely don't recover like when I was 20. Being 21 now I really have to watch my volume and now when to shut it down.



;)



Really though you older guys are inspiring.

mastermonster
12-10-2010, 03:19 PM
I'll be 55 in less than a month and truely hope to make my best lifts after I recover from this partial shoulder replacement. I've lifted a lot of years since I was 14. I made my best meet lifts just a month or so short of 50 in 2005 in Finland. It was on openers of 804 - 600 - 600 for 2006 with the change. My best raw meet #s are all after 50. Squat 600 - bench 402 - total 1603 at 53 in 2009; and deadlift 600 at 52. All of my best gym lifts have been after 50 also. I know Brian Meeks hit his best lifts after 55 and even at 60 plus. I know because his are the records I chased for the last 10 years. Genetics is a factor but not mentally giving in to what the rest of the world is telling you is too old is a huge factor as well.

Buccos1
12-10-2010, 03:38 PM
[QUOTE=UncleAl;2408549]At 41, you're just a pup, Vince! We Italians don't peak out 'til we're in our 80's....Oh wait, that's sexually.

[QUOTE] That's funny

I'm getting closer to 40 and am still getting stronger, despite a lot of nagging injuries. This is great reading about everyone in their 40s/50s still adding to their totals and getting stronger!

UncleAl
12-11-2010, 10:08 AM
I'll be 55 in less than a month and truely hope to make my best lifts after I recover from this partial shoulder replacement. I've lifted a lot of years since I was 14. I made my best meet lifts just a month or so short of 50 in 2005 in Finland. It was on openers of 804 - 600 - 600 for 2006 with the change. My best raw meet #s are all after 50. Squat 600 - bench 402 - total 1603 at 53 in 2009; and deadlift 600 at 52. All of my best gym lifts have been after 50 also. I know Brian Meeks hit his best lifts after 55 and even at 60 plus. I know because his are the records I chased for the last 10 years. Genetics is a factor but not mentally giving in to what the rest of the world is telling you is too old is a huge factor as well.

That is AMAZING! I can see where those of us who haven't been powerlifting for long can improve as seniors, because we're strengthening muscles we haven't used before and still improving form...however, I never thought that could be true of those of you who have been at it for a lifetime. At the rate you're going, you'll probably set some all-time records in your 80s.

Hope you heal quickly.

Magilla
12-11-2010, 10:35 AM
I'll be 55 in less than a month and truely hope to make my best lifts after I recover from this partial shoulder replacement. I've lifted a lot of years since I was 14. I made my best meet lifts just a month or so short of 50 in 2005 in Finland. It was on openers of 804 - 600 - 600 for 2006 with the change. My best raw meet #s are all after 50. Squat 600 - bench 402 - total 1603 at 53 in 2009; and deadlift 600 at 52. All of my best gym lifts have been after 50 also. I know Brian Meeks hit his best lifts after 55 and even at 60 plus. I know because his are the records I chased for the last 10 years. Genetics is a factor but not mentally giving in to what the rest of the world is telling you is too old is a huge factor as well.

You are an inspiration!

mastermonster
12-11-2010, 12:19 PM
Thanks Uncle Al and Magilla!

MikeWilliams
12-11-2010, 05:10 PM
well one of the major factors is the presence of testosterone in your system, whether it is natural or synthetic....they say your natural production starts declining in your mid 30's, but I'm sure that is not the case for every person...with the assistance of trt or as I'm sure you could continue well into your 50's making gains

mastermonster
12-12-2010, 03:11 PM
well one of the major factors is the presence of testosterone in your system, whether it is natural or synthetic....they say your natural production starts declining in your mid 30's, but I'm sure that is not the case for every person...with the assistance of trt or as I'm sure you could continue well into your 50's making gains


This is true. I'm a huge advocate of 'any male', not just athletes; having their testosterone level checked regularly after 40ish for their health and well being. When it plummits to below normal the body accelerates the process of aging and dying. Quality of life is greatly dimenished. Every drive you have starts going away as well. Thank God we now have the knowledge and technology to manage this. More and more doctors are realizing this is a treatable condition and the benefits of doing so.

I was approaching my mid 40s when I was diagnosed and began treatment. It has been a life changing experience for me. Make sure you see a doctor with the hormone system as part of his/her specialty. Like an endocrinologist or a urologist.

Ruff Riff
12-14-2010, 12:59 PM
This is an interesting question..... I have only been lifting like this for about 3 years now and I am 35, all the guys I train with are l25 or less. I sure don't recover quite as well as when I was 25 but I do OK. They keep me thinking young and that is pretty important! I was a decathlete in college and my specialty was field events so I was a more "gangly" and a stronger decath then a speed guy so I always liked lifting and strength training where as others liked the time on the track more? I think getting into it late is good and bad. The good is that my body does not have years of stress on it, but the bad is that I have not put in the time to always KNOW what will work for me or how to incorporate what I need to do into what I want to do? I know I want to get a 500 raw natural bench but the how is a little tricky? LOL!

I train with some pretty strong, sharp guys that usually "try" and help me out, I see lots of guys that are older getting stronger, owner of a gym I go to just won the Ohio state championship for his weight class and he is in his mid to late 40's? I think it is reletive to injury and how smart you learn to train and listen to YOUR BODY!!! What works for some may not work for you and only YOU can know that for sure? Knowing the difference between and ache and an injury? Really understanding your body and how it reacts to different stresses has got to be a plus, so I would think the wheel house for strength has to be 32 to 40? If you could put the knowlege you get at 35 into your 20 year old body we would all be dangerous!!!!!!

I think if a guy PR's at 50 he is probably really honed in his training techniques and if he had those more tuned at 40 he would have hit those numbers then????

IDK, hard to say but I LOVE to see guys hit PR's at older ages because as a late starter I don't think I am gonna be able to put this power lifting thing down any time soon!

banger
12-14-2010, 01:47 PM
I started lifting weights when I was in college, weighed in at about 155 when I started and packed on about
30 pounds in a couple of months. When I got out of college in 91, I was benching about 315 in the gym. I
had stayed around that range up until about three years ago, then I found this forum. Started reading about
training, setup, supplements, routintes, setup, drive. I entered a compettion and did 320 in USAPL not
knowing what I was doing. Up until about 3 months ago (elbow injury), I was doing 350 in the gym at the
age of 42. Now, I'm going to start using a shirt for the first time in my life to see where that takes me, and
I'm still right at my college weight of around 185-190.

I'm with a lot of guys on this forum. I don't think 40 as is old, and I feel pissed off that for years I was
doing things the wrong way until I started getting myself educated about the right way to do things, I can
only imagine where I would be at know, but I'm still making gains, so I take it from there. You may start
feeling burned out from the same grind, and from what I keep hearing from guys on this forum, it may be
time to switch to something else for a year or two, like strongman, olympic lifts, or other lifts for PR's
that are off the beaten track of the big three lifts. Taking a break and coming back refreshed and stronger
then before.

As for me, I'm still pursuing the four wheel bench and keeping my weight under 200lbs, and I'll fight like hell to get there, as I feel I got a good 15 years in front of me to keep after it.

Kim

sb1
12-20-2010, 11:54 AM
I am 51 and hit several PR's in my late 40's 47-48 years old, 601 single ply squat @ 220, 688 double ply@lite 242 562 DL and 457 single ply bench at 242. Comparing these to my lifts 20 years prior@198 my squat was 611, bench a poor 331(old inzer 50/50 cotton/poly), and 540 DL, meet lifts, gym lifts were a bit higher.. I recently did a raw meet on a 5 week cycle and hit an easy 491 squat, 248 bench and 512 DL. So I don't feel like I have lost much, more upper body strength then lower, but I think most of my problem there comes from scar tissue and adhesions which may be holding my lift back. I also compete in Strongman in the Masters division(40 and over) and routinely beat the younger guys in many events and contests.

Lastly my old training partner is 53 and still hitting National level PR's.

Scott

mastermonster
12-20-2010, 02:33 PM
I am 51 and hit several PR's in my late 40's 47-48 years old, 601 single ply squat @ 220, 688 double ply@lite 242 562 DL and 457 single ply bench at 242. Comparing these to my lifts 20 years prior@198 my squat was 611, bench a poor 331(old inzer 50/50 cotton/poly), and 540 DL, meet lifts, gym lifts were a bit higher.. I recently did a raw meet on a 5 week cycle and hit an easy 491 squat, 248 bench and 512 DL. So I don't feel like I have lost much, more upper body strength then lower, but I think most of my problem there comes from scar tissue and adhesions which may be holding my lift back. I also compete in Strongman in the Masters division(40 and over) and routinely beat the younger guys in many events and contests.

Lastly my old training partner is 53 and still hitting National level PR's.

Scott

My hat's off to you doing Strongman meets at over 50! I did my only one at 51 (just wanted to experience one). I came out of it with a whole new respect level for guys who do them regularly. I did well, but don't think I could have done them very often and stayed healthy. Those events really remind you of all your old football injuries!

sb1
12-20-2010, 04:02 PM
A fellow aged powerlifter told me the reason I started Strongman was that I just hadn't damaged myself enough doing powerlifting. It's as much conditioning as it is strength. In the last one I did, we did DL for reps w/365, which was a bit light, turned into 19 reps in 60 seconds. http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=523425664#!/video/video.php?v=168103099872768

mastermonster
12-20-2010, 11:37 PM
A fellow aged powerlifter told me the reason I started Strongman was that I just hadn't damaged myself enough doing powerlifting. It's as much conditioning as it is strength. In the last one I did, we did DL for reps w/365, which was a bit light, turned into 19 reps in 60 seconds. http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=523425664#!/video/video.php?v=168103099872768

I did the 'Geogia's Strongest Man' at 51. The dl for reps was my best event. 405 for 15 reps in 60 seconds. Lost that event by 1 rep! I did ok in the medley (720 lb. tire flip - 500 lb.? yolk walk - sled drag). Fair on the log lift (awkward). 275 lb. stone was the best I could load & the farmers walk kicked my butt! Glad I did it once though and came out relatively uninjured! I can definately relate more now when I watch 'Worlds Strongest Man'!

drew
12-21-2010, 07:24 AM
Age is just a number. I don't think I'm "old" but I'm definitely not young either. I think at some point people allow their age to become an excuse. It's just like anything else, you learn to adapt. If you have a shoulder injury, you work around it. And if your old bones can only handle 2 training sessions a week instead of 4, you do that. The minute you allow your age to be the reason you aren't progressing is the minute that it becomes the reason.

Vincent, at 41 I've seen you adapt and change to improve. I've seen you go into meets looking no part of 41 and smashing PRs. I have no doubt that, if you want to, you will be doing the same thing at 51. You are one of the exceptions though. You are a hardcore competitor and you always look to get better. Not only that, your attitude makes the people around you better.

I've always held that this is not a sport for the excuse-makers, but you prove my point. If there is a reason, any reason, why you aren't improving, you either find out the reason and fix it, or you ****ing quit. Guys that quit because they are "too old" would have quit anyway if there was a different reason that presented itself sooner.

BigMike230
12-21-2010, 01:34 PM
This is a very cool and inspiring thread...

It is awesome to see heavy lifters get stronger at any age!

UncleAl
12-22-2010, 08:37 AM
...you learn to adapt. ...if your old bones can only handle 2 training sessions a week instead of 4, you do that.

That's an excellent point, Drew. Even at my relatively advanced age, I can still progress as long as I keep my "old bones" in mind, and one of the best ways is to extend my mesocycles. For example, most of you do the 5-3-1 in one week. I tried that and fried my CNS. So, this year, I extended it to nine days. Did the same thing with HCT-12. Made great progress on both (all PRs listed below accomplished since October). It just took me a little longer to get there.

Off Road
12-22-2010, 08:41 AM
Ya, I think as you get older, you have to train smarter. But gains can still be made...

KarlMarx
12-22-2010, 09:36 AM
I am surprised more people haven't mentioned the fact that 'performance enhancing' drugs are a factor. Including some serious advances in terms of substances and their use. Although, I do respect many of the motives that would keep people silent on this issue (i.e. not leading young guys into drug use, etc.)


well one of the major factors is the presence of testosterone in your system, whether it is natural or synthetic....they say your natural production starts declining in your mid 30's, but I'm sure that is not the case for every person...with the assistance of trt or as I'm sure you could continue well into your 50's making gains

Ryano
12-22-2010, 02:26 PM
Just found out that one of my benches from last year made the 308 top 50 "all time" list. Only #46, but it's nice to be on a list with Vinny when I'm 55 years old.LOL (even if I'm not very close).

mastermonster
12-22-2010, 05:37 PM
Just found out that one of my benches from last year made the 308 top 50 "all time" list. Only #46, but it's nice to be on a list with Vinny when I'm 55 years old.LOL (even if I'm not very close).

Congrats Roger! Your bench #s are mind boggling!

D00d
12-22-2010, 08:07 PM
I would say some people are luckier with lifting than others. Obviously most people attribute the fact that they are weak to genetics, but that is part of the problem, even though most of the problem is unwillingness to actually work. Not just anyone can become a heavy lifter. I'm not even sure I can, but I have only been lifting seriously for like 6 months (not really seriously, but for me it is). My workout buddy has been doing the same stuff I have, and actually more, but I have seen more gains, presumably due to my genetics. Will we still be gaining when we are 50? Who knows, maybe he will, but I won't.
Anyway, some people are made to experience gains and stuff. I'm sure you all know this, but it's my only argument. Some older lifters may experience gains while some may not, but it is probably due to genetics more than anything else at that point, where as at a younger age, the only reason not to gain is lack of effort.

NickAus
12-22-2010, 09:33 PM
Just a quick observation, all the soft pussies I know or have meet always use age as an excuse for all sorts of things and these guys are under 40.

Its just something weak people do (make excuses) and age is a good one for them, my Dad is 63 and can lift more than most of my mates and hes not really into lifting all that much.

I can not believe how often these girlie boys say stuff like "yeah its hard when your older" when they are 30 years old, when we were young they were too young and now all of a sudden they are too old lol.

PLENTY of strong lifters over 45.

pricedtosell
12-22-2010, 09:59 PM
I am surprised more people haven't mentioned the fact that 'performance enhancing' drugs are a factor. Including some serious advances in terms of substances and their use. Although, I do respect many of the motives that would keep people silent on this issue (i.e. not leading young guys into drug use, etc.)

I agree, didn't Louie Simmons do his best lifting when he was at least 50 or so? It's also a good point someone made about strength being the last thing to go, that's why the best olympic lifters are the ones who got into it as kids and hit their prime around their early 20's. If they don't make it by then, they probably never will.

I kind've think raw lifters hit their prime a bit earlier than those who lift in gear, speed seems to be more important for raw lifters and I think doing your heaviest lifting in gear might prevent some of those more common injuries lifters get.

I'd agree with everyone who's said 45. I'd say, if a person's already been lifting a long time at that age, that's when their best days are probably behind them. If you started lifting later on in life, then I'm sure you can keep improving and getting stronger as long as your body holds up. Still, I'd say after 45, you can probably assume you won't be breaking any records, unless they're records for your age category.

UncleAl
12-23-2010, 07:11 AM
Just found out that one of my benches from last year made the 308 top 50 "all time" list. Only #46, but it's nice to be on a list with Vinny when I'm 55 years old.LOL (even if I'm not very close).

ONLY 46th...on the all-time list? Sheesh!

That is one incredible feat for a 55 year old. Congratulations, brother. You are one strong old mo fo.

Ryano
12-23-2010, 11:25 AM
Thanks Uncle Al. I my lift from last month should move me up a few. Still chasin' PRs, just gettin' em less & less often.

mastermonster
12-23-2010, 09:03 PM
Just a quick observation, all the soft pussies I know or have meet always use age as an excuse for all sorts of things and these guys are under 40.

Its just something weak people do (make excuses) and age is a good one for them, my Dad is 63 and can lift more than most of my mates and hes not really into lifting all that much.

I can not believe how often these girlie boys say stuff like "yeah its hard when your older" when they are 30 years old, when we were young they were too young and now all of a sudden they are too old lol.

PLENTY of strong lifters over 45.

I really like this Nick! Good observation! When I was in my early 20's and playing college football I'd help my grandfather (Paw Paw) on his small farm some. He worked in a Good Year Tire factory and farmed on the side. He was in his mid 60's then. He was an impressive physical specimin for his age...pretty much any age. He was also the hardest working man I ever knew. It always amazed me that he would try to get me to let him lift logs and stuff that he was afraid I get hurt on! If genetics is a factor for strength, he was the source of mine! But the question remains. Was it genetics or a man with a iron work ethic and a young man's mentality?

kzk464s
12-24-2010, 07:38 AM
ONLY 46th...on the all-time list? Sheesh!

That is one incredible feat for a 55 year old. Congratulations, brother. You are one strong old mo fo.

The is one incredible feat for anyone!!

I wonder if other life circumstances have something to do with this too, ie kids and work. It would certainly be tough to juggle that all around, especially if there are other people in the training crew in the same circumstance.

Not listing it as an excuse, but it could be one of those things where people's priorities change, so that could also be why we don't hear as much of the older lifters as we do the younger ones.

dammstrate
12-24-2010, 09:03 AM
I PR'ed my squat and dead at age 47, and PR'ed my bench at 48.

Squat and bench are still improving, if I can avoid getting injured again (bicep detachment 2 months ago).

I know Dan Verala is >60 and still making gains.

Ryan Celli
12-24-2010, 10:07 AM
At 36 I'm the strongest I've ever been. In my opinion, Injuries are the biggest factor as to how well you do as you age in this sport.

For me it seems, It's all about maintaining strength while fighting injuries.

I look back and think, younger I've hit some big numbers and over the years my lifts haven't went up drastically, I blame this on injuries more than anything. Small injuries damaging muscles, tendons, and ligaments making gains harder and harder to come by.

Luckily we have supplements to aid our recovery as we age and recovery becomes harder and harder. I would never be where I'm at strength and size wise without my ETS, BCAA's, OPTICEN, NITREAN, and RESULTS!

I will say, I defiantly have not hit my peak yet! Bigger numbers still to come....

mastermonster
12-24-2010, 12:13 PM
I PR'ed my squat and dead at age 47, and PR'ed my bench at 48.

Squat and bench are still improving, if I can avoid getting injured again (bicep detachment 2 months ago).

I know Dan Verala is >60 and still making gains.

You and Debbie both have made incredible gains in the few years I've known you. You both have defied age!

Ryano
12-24-2010, 12:52 PM
The is one incredible feat for anyone!!

I wonder if other life circumstances have something to do with this too, ie kids and work. It would certainly be tough to juggle that all around, especially if there are other people in the training crew in the same circumstance.

Not listing it as an excuse, but it could be one of those things where people's priorities change, so that could also be why we don't hear as much of the older lifters as we do the younger ones.

I'm sure that life circumstances are a factor. I'm a retired police officer. I retired after 25+ years on the job at the age of 49. I lifted during my entire career, but didn't start competing until my late 40's. I can now go to the gym and train just about anytime I want. I'm able to eat just about anytime I want. I also take a nap several times/week. Anyone that is older with physical type job is at a great disadvantage. Yawnnnnn....I think I'll take that nap now. Everyone have a safe & Merry Xmas.

NickAus
12-24-2010, 01:05 PM
I really like this Nick! Good observation! When I was in my early 20's and playing college football I'd help my grandfather (Paw Paw) on his small farm some. He worked in a Good Year Tire factory and farmed on the side. He was in his mid 60's then. He was an impressive physical specimin for his age...pretty much any age. He was also the hardest working man I ever knew. It always amazed me that he would try to get me to let him lift logs and stuff that he was afraid I get hurt on! If genetics is a factor for strength, he was the source of mine! But the question remains. Was it genetics or a man with a iron work ethic and a young man's mentality?

Yeah I think it's mostly mental personally.

bigbadwolfe
12-25-2010, 04:25 PM
Damn you guys are getting old!!! Ohh wait 40 is just a few yrs away for me :)

I think a lot of it is just gonna be how you train and if you train smart. You got to listen to your body especially as we get older, I know I'm on my third run now at benching and this time around I got a lot more aches and pains but my strength is coming back very nicely. 40,50,60 Hell who knows???

Roger you sir are just a FREAK!!!!!

UncleAl
12-26-2010, 11:54 AM
I wonder if other life circumstances have something to do with this too, ie kids and work. .

It's HUGE. You know, I listen to all sorts of crap, especially from my family, about how I'm too old for this stuff, but no one takes into consideration the fact that, as a retired empty nester, I have zero job/kid stress (except when I have a bad workout) and get all the recovery time I need. Yea, Ryan, those snoozes I take after lunch every day are priceless.