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4g64fiero
01-06-2011, 03:54 PM
So for I have been performing the same movements in some sort of bastard child Texas Method routine. I just add weight every week and eat alot. Its simple, theres just not alot you can mess up. I can feel myself getting stalled alot now, though. I feel I have neglected some areas.

Anyways, I see all these programs out there(specifically 5/3/1 and Ed Coan stuff) that use alot of periodization. The problem I have with that is that I dont fully understand the purpose. Something tells me hey- it makes sense to vary the intensity of your accesories to focus on the main lifts, but I still dont fully understand how periodization works especially since its been awhile since I have actually done alot of accessory work.

Can anyone explain the process and theory in which periodization works to me? I have observed other's logs but its not immediately clear.

mchicia1
01-06-2011, 04:01 PM
So for I have been performing the same movements in some sort of bastard child Texas Method routine. I just add weight every week and eat alot. Its simple, theres just not alot you can mess up. I can feel myself getting stalled alot now, though. I feel I have neglected some areas.

Anyways, I see all these programs out there(specifically 5/3/1 and Ed Coan stuff) that use alot of periodization. The problem I have with that is that I dont fully understand the purpose. Something tells me hey- it makes sense to vary the intensity of your accesories to focus on the main lifts, but I still dont fully understand how periodization works especially since its been awhile since I have actually done alot of accessory work.

Can anyone explain the process and theory in which periodization works to me? I have observed other's logs but its not immediately clear.

The number one reason is to avoid plateaus. If you are constantly working with the same movement for the same exact number of reps week in and week out, its very tough to even move up 5 pounds. 5/3/1 may use the same movement every week, but it varies the rep ranges and intensity and allows you month to month of plateau free progression. For instance, you may be stuck on a 250 bench in the same rep range. What if you dropped the weight to 230 and upped the reps by 2 or 3? Or on the flip side, upped the weight and only performed 1-2 reps? This may push you right past that 250x5 plateau.

Dan Fanelli
01-06-2011, 04:21 PM
Really, periodization the way you see in text books and around the web isn't that important. Maybe for certain competative athletes, but for most, its not needed.

Basically periodization separates training into different "cycles" or periods. You might have a prepatory gpp cycle, and then go into a hypertrophy cycle, then strength/power, and then a peaking cycle. Like I said, it makes sense for some sports, where they are training leading up to one big competition.

Periodization for everyone else is really just used to prevent injuries and stalling. If you expose yourself to the same exact stressors repeatedly for long enough, your adaptations will start to dwindle, and you'll regress, or worse become injured.

You have experienced this first hand with the linear progression in your program. At the point where you are now, you cannot keep progressing with the exact same workouts. If you keep trying the same thing and keep stalling, its possible you'd become injured.

So SOMETHING must be changed. It might not need to be much. Maybe more food, more sleep, less frequent workouts, etc. Usually its best to make small changes first. Where people usually make the biggest mistake is they start to stall and then change everything up entirely.

Some programs have built in methods of preventing going stale. This would likely either be deload/recovery periods, or adding variety.

So you know you need to switch something up, but what you switch will depend on your goals. If you are just trying to get bigger/stronger and are currently doing the TM then you can either do what Rippetoe suggests when someone stalls, or start to venture away from the TM..

There are really a ton of options, but looking into complex periodization models would not be one of the better options. I'd recommend moving up to more "intermediate" type training programs like HCT-12 or WB.

4g64fiero
01-06-2011, 04:24 PM
Thats what I was looking for. I will probably do HCT if TM starts to completely fall apart for me. Thanks guys!

mchicia1
01-06-2011, 04:34 PM
Thats what I was looking for. I will probably do HCT if TM starts to completely fall apart for me. Thanks guys!

Not a bad choice...you may even want to try exercise rotation on hct-12 since you are basically doing the same thing you are already doing. That is, working the same movement in the same rep range every time. I would probably rotate 2 exercises per bodypart trained.