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greemah
01-18-2011, 03:46 PM
If someone is looking to become just generally fit and healthy, doing only complexes so the muscles still get worked a bit - 3-4 times a weeks, what should their diet look like?

- What kind of macro ratios would be good?
- What would the nutritional timing be like (e.g. carbs in morning, pre/post workout, with dinner, etc)
- How much protein would be needed (asking because it is sure to be less than a typical bodybuilding diet)

Nutritional timing and protein levels are my main question, as most normal people have rice with dinner etc but it doesn't seem healthy to me to have carbs in the evening if you haven't just had a workout

Dan Fanelli
01-18-2011, 05:49 PM
Some of your ideas are on the right track. There is no real difference between a "weight lifter" and a "non-weightlifter". You are stil going to have the problems that were adressed in the "complexes only" thread. Building/maintaining muscle is going to be very hard if not impossible.

In that case, raising protein and lowering carbs will definately be necessary, but its still a losing battle in the long run.

So basically, the same as anyone else, with less calories, less carbs, and more protein.

greemah
01-18-2011, 06:00 PM
I'm not looking to do this for muscle gain/maintenance, but for general fitness and hopefully look a bit more muscular than your average skinny cardio person.

I assumed protein would be less than on a weight-lifters diet because your muscles wouldn't need to much for recovery as you aren't lifting heavy weights doing complexes?

Regarding carb timing for a diet like this - is it ok to have carbs with dinner or is it really pointless to have any carbs other than pre/post workout and in the morning?

Off Road
01-18-2011, 06:04 PM
I think you are complicating things too much. If you want to build muscle, then work out heavy and abreviated. If you want to look fit, take up swimmimg or crossfit. The diet principals remain the same; If you want to gain size, eat more. If you want to lose size, eat less. It doesn't need to be more complicated than that.

Dan Fanelli
01-18-2011, 06:07 PM
I'm not looking to do this for muscle gain/maintenance, but for general fitness and hopefully look a bit more muscular than your average skinny cardio person.

I assumed protein would be less than on a weight-lifters diet because your muscles wouldn't need to much for recovery as you aren't lifting heavy weights doing complexes?

Regarding carb timing for a diet like this - is it ok to have carbs with dinner or is it really pointless to have any carbs other than pre/post workout and in the morning?

Ya, you'd probably be able to look A BIT more muscular than the average cardio person. But still, why not just include a little bit of heavy resistance training. It would be much more efficient.

As for the protein. Yes, you'll need less actual amount of grams. But you'll also need a higher %. So your calories might go down, but your protein stays the same.

As for carb timing. Its going to be the same as anyone else really. Heavy resistance training will improve insulin sensitivity (another reason to do it), but other than that it would be "optimal" to only take in carbs around workout times.

Dan Fanelli
01-18-2011, 06:10 PM
I think you are complicating things too much. If you want to build muscle, then work out heavy and abreviated. If you want to look fit, take up swimmimg or crossfit. The diet principals remain the same; If you want to gain size, eat more. If you want to lose size, eat less. It doesn't need to be more complicated than that.

X2 /endthread.

greemah
01-18-2011, 06:49 PM
Thanks for your replies. Just out of curiosity, if someone who didn't lift weights ate 1gram of protein per pound of bodyweight like a bodybuilder does, would that end up having negative effects? As it wouldn't all get used in recovery so surely it would be bad for your liver or kidneys etc?

Dan Fanelli
01-18-2011, 07:05 PM
Thanks for your replies. Just out of curiosity, if someone who didn't lift weights ate 1gram of protein per pound of bodyweight like a bodybuilder does, would that end up having negative effects? As it wouldn't all get used in recovery so surely it would be bad for your liver or kidneys etc?

No..... Its a myth... Too much is going to be better than too little, unless you ahve some sort of pre-existing kidney condition.

Too much carbs is going to be bad
Too much fat is going to be bad as well
Too much protein usually isn't a problem

Also, people usually overestimate their protein, and underestimate their carbs/fat.

greemah
01-18-2011, 09:51 PM
Thanks for your replies guys

Behemoth
01-19-2011, 10:35 AM
Simply eat quality foods and don't overindulge.

r2473
01-19-2011, 02:44 PM
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ncsuLuke
01-19-2011, 04:22 PM
Personally I am a big fan of the Paleo diet for things like this. If you do a good job of following it you are eating quality lean meats, vegetables, and fruits. Definitely healthy even though you will hear a lot of people talk down about it.

Behemoth
01-19-2011, 04:22 PM
If people followed this, the entire "Diet and Nutrition" section would be unnecessary.

It was simple advice for a "Diet for not weight-lifters". Rather than try and be a smartass and contribute nothing to a thread why don't you give the OP some advice of your own.

ryuage
01-19-2011, 05:49 PM
you want to be generally fit... then generally workout and eat "healthily"

r2473
01-20-2011, 10:09 AM
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