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Rugby Dad
02-08-2011, 10:47 AM
what is it about mental prep? Seems like everytime i wanna hit a big lift or PR it doesn't happen, even after going thru all the psyching, mental focus, etc.

But when i give less thought and just in there training, then I hit new PR
Yeah the easy answer is to just stick with what works, but the idea of NOT having a clearly defined goal or plan in my head just don't seem right. :confused:

JeffreyXL
02-08-2011, 11:20 AM
Music always helps me! And try to visualisate your lift

vdizenzo
02-08-2011, 11:38 AM
Two books have helped me greatly. Total Mind Body Training and Finding Your Zone. Athletes severely underestimate how important mental training is.

AdamBAG
02-08-2011, 11:50 AM
It sounds to me like all the psyching up etc. is causing you to lose focus and your technique breaks down.

Calm down, take your time, and execute the lift. The adrenaline will still be there.

Ermantroudt
02-08-2011, 02:10 PM
Flow: The Psychology of Optimal Experience helped me set patterns for establishing my best performance. Becoming overly aroused prior to taking an attempt left me tired and unable to perform at my best. Focusing on my sleep, food, hydration and technique has led to far more PR's than cranking up the music and hitting the ammonia ever had.

NickAus
02-08-2011, 02:16 PM
I stay pretty calm but have plenty of agression inside at the same time.

Some great advice above!

theBarzeen
02-08-2011, 04:22 PM
I do exactly like I do when I set up for my first warm up set..... picture the lift and think about form.

The only lift that seems to change at all when I'm psyched up is the deadlift...... for that I picture the lift, tell myself to go man up, then go pull.


Some people can get all psyched up and go, but most of that focus just comes from inside..... go watch a video of Vogelpohl or Benni Magnussen ( sp?)

Bosshogg300
02-08-2011, 05:36 PM
i listen to music loud and close my eyes and focus and visualize the lift and concentrate my enery on the lift i rarely go crazy psyching myself up because i dont want to waste energy

Dan Fanelli
02-08-2011, 05:43 PM
Some people do better with high amounts of arousal, and others dont do so well with high levels of arousal.

For me, I go get pretty "amped" and my vision/focus narrows.

Just do what works for you though.

4g64fiero
02-08-2011, 06:02 PM
I am an anxious guy so I just try to calm down as much as possible before hand while concentrating on not holding anything back.

I know its contradictory, but it helps me focus how nervous I am into something positive.

ScottYard
02-08-2011, 06:11 PM
MY plan is to try and concentrate on the little things in training. MY hope is that once its time for a top PR single that I can just go in and do the damn thing and not have to think about. I just take faith that all the work has been done all ready and now its just time to do it.

SELK
02-08-2011, 07:09 PM
For the squat I try to treat 315 the same way I treat 900, approach the bar the same, visualize the lift the same and actually try to remain calm. If I get to amped up my form gets very bad.

For the deadlift since I have very little technique I can stand to get a more jacked up, but all I am thinking about is ripping the weight off the floor as fast as I possibly can.

For the bench I just try to stay calm and focus, I really need to always be thinking about technique here.

Clone
02-09-2011, 05:00 AM
Two books have helped me greatly. Total Mind Body Training and Finding Your Zone. Athletes severely underestimate how important mental training is.

Finding Your Zone is a good book, I have it as well.

I used to psyche myself out with negative thoughts. As much as I wanted to kill it, I would think things like "Don't get stuffed", "Don't let your grip slip", " Don't do this that and the other". I thought that was the way to make sure I didn't do those things.

That was the wrong way to go about it. You've got to think all positive and erase any negative thoughts.

Think about doing the right things and make it a habit. It must be second nature.

I used to race downhill (on a mountain bike) and was haveing issues. A female racer told me two great pieces of advice.

First was this: If you're flying down the trail and theres a big rock you want to avoid, don't focus on avoiding the rock, cuz you'll surely smack right into it. Focus on picking the line that goes around it. Pick that line and focus on that line and RIDE that line. Don't think about what you DON'T want to do.

Second was: Don't be afraid to win.

vdizenzo
02-09-2011, 05:34 AM
Some people do better with high amounts of arousal, and others dont do so well with high levels of arousal.

For me, I go get pretty "amped" and my vision/focus narrows.

Just do what works for you though.


No offense to you or anyone else in this thread, but "most" of the best strength athletes I have ever seen are very focused during their performance. It is more times than not I see the amped up lifters miss attempts on breakdowns in their form when they get to max attempts.

AdamBAG
02-09-2011, 06:50 AM
MY plan is to try and concentrate on the little things in training. MY hope is that once its time for a top PR single that I can just go in and do the damn thing and not have to think about. I just take faith that all the work has been done all ready and now its just time to do it.


No offense to you or anyone else in this thread, but "most" of the best strength athletes I have ever seen are very focused during their performance. It is more times than not I see the amped up lifters miss attempts on breakdowns in their form when they get to max attempts.

This is damn good advice from Scott and Vincent...I need to take some of this to heart myself.

I always do best when I go through the same mental checklist for every lift. Whether it is 135 or a PR. The adrenaline will be there, you just have to execute.

mikesbench
02-09-2011, 08:35 AM
Loving this thread, this is such an underappreciated part of training / competition. It seems almost everyone has different opinions on what works for them, but it's ineresting to hear these because I know I've never put too much thought into how I prepare myself mentally; I do what I do, but I've never attempted to "train" myself to prepare any specific way mentally; I just go with my "personality" I guess.

I think I may have to look into the books mentioned and see what I might be able to improve on in this aspect.

drew
02-09-2011, 10:57 AM
When going after a PR or really any weight, I just try to focus on technique and make sure I do everything right. To me, if I do everything that I'm supposed to do, I will complete the lift. The weight on the bar doesn't really matter. If I can't lift it, it was too heavy. I also try to distract myself, especially during a meet. I find that if I let myself get psyched up about a lift or overthink it, I will forget to do what I have trained to do and then I lose focus.

Travis Bell
02-09-2011, 11:57 AM
Vin is spot on. The guys I've seen go nuts 9 times out of 10 miss their attempt. They are unfocused

This has nothing to do with arousal. Arousal (trying not to make a joke here lol) is more in reference to a person's state of mental acuity. So it really could be argued that people who are slapping themselves, running around shouting and screaming are less acute than someone who is focused and intent on what they need to do

Running through a mental checklist is much more helpful and focusing on the common mistakes that you make and correcting them.

Brian C
02-09-2011, 03:27 PM
I stay very calm and focused on squats and bench, just thinking about form and what I need to do to make the lift. Pulling, I may psych myself up more, grip it and rip it.

SELK
02-09-2011, 04:31 PM
I really think the deadlift is different, especially if you pull conventional.. There is not a hell of a lot of form, any any form you do have is going to **** for a maximum attempt anyway.