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Partyfoul
02-25-2011, 02:49 PM
I have a buddy that did a "Spagehtti O's" diet (he literally just ate Spagehtti O's). It was pretty light on the wallet and amazing that it actually worked. Anyone else know of things similar to this?

Mercuryblade
02-25-2011, 02:58 PM
This frustrates me to no end is one of the primary reasons their is obesity in this country.
Processed food is NOT CHEAP, it's easy.

Go to the supermaket, get cabbage, carrots, a bag of frozen chicken breasts, chicken sausagesm eggs, bread, pasta, frozen grean beans/broccoli (broccoli tends to be a bit more expensive), lettuce (not the chopped up stuff, the whole heads), ground beef when it's on sale, peanut butter, oatmeal.

I survive on about $4/day in food, and I eat unbelievably well.

ThomasG
02-25-2011, 03:00 PM
This frustrates me to no end is one of the primary reasons their is obesity in this country.
Processed food is NOT CHEAP, it's easy.

Go to the supermaket, get cabbage, carrots, a bag of frozen chicken breasts, chicken sausagesm eggs, bread, pasta, frozen grean beans/broccoli (broccoli tends to be a bit more expensive), lettuce (not the chopped up stuff, the whole heads), ground beef when it's on sale, peanut butter, oatmeal.

I survive on about $4/day in food, and I eat unbelievably well.

This. I'd like to add milk and eggs to that list. Yea even though milk 2$ gallon that still a lot of calories for the price.

Mercuryblade
02-25-2011, 03:01 PM
If you wanted to go even cheaper you could eat hardboiled eggs and salad, and peanut butter and jelly sandwiches. That kind of diet could probably go under $3/day.

tom183
02-25-2011, 03:17 PM
I have a buddy that did a "Spagehtti O's" diet (he literally just ate Spagehtti O's). It was pretty light on the wallet and amazing that it actually worked.

Define 'worked'.

I'm not going to join the pricing discussion. The price difference of items between here and the US is too large but I definitely agree with Mercuryblade when he says:


Processed food is NOT CHEAP, it's easy.

Behemoth
02-25-2011, 03:33 PM
Cheap protein - bulk chicken breast, bulk tuna, bulk protein powder
Cheap carbs - oats, rice, ww pastas etc
Cheap fats - olive oil, nuts

Cheap foods with multiple quality macro sources - eggs, milk, LF cheese



edit - cheap alc - vladimir

dechrist
02-26-2011, 05:58 AM
Forreal though you can buy a weeks worth of veggies for 10-15 bucks tops.

I usually get

two containers of mixed greens
squash zuchini
broccoli
salsa
brussel sprouts

and it's cheap. I buy grass fed beef from local farms and it's a bit expensive but ALL meat is kinda expensive. you gotta know where your priorities lie.

f=ma
02-26-2011, 07:26 AM
Cheap protein - bulk chicken breast, bulk tuna, bulk protein powder
Cheap carbs - oats, rice, ww pastas etc
Cheap fats - olive oil, nuts

Cheap foods with multiple quality macro sources - eggs, milk, LF cheese



edit - cheap alc - ethanol

this is almost exactly what i eat day in day out

Behemoth
02-26-2011, 09:11 AM
this is almost exactly what i eat day in day out

no vlady?

f=ma
02-27-2011, 03:52 PM
no vlady?

hah. the lowest i would sink is sky

ThomasG
02-27-2011, 03:53 PM
I've recently upgraded to pinnacle from potters. Ballin!

f=ma
02-27-2011, 03:58 PM
break out the sunglasses.. its time to partayyy

K.Huget
02-27-2011, 05:26 PM
In the spring and summer of 2009 I did a cut almost solely on kraft dinner, tuna, milk, and peanut butter. I'm not condoning it but it was ridiculously cheap. I went from 217 lbs to 195 lbs.

That being said, I agree with Behemoth and his list.

RichMcGuire
02-27-2011, 06:18 PM
I really enjoy the dollar menu off mcdonalds. When I have more money, I go for the big macs though. Delicious!

With that, Ramen noodles are dirt cheap, so is milk and pb.

Bosch232
02-28-2011, 06:54 PM
I sat down for about 30 min one day and did an analysis of "cost per gram of protein"

Eggs came in lowest at (I think) 9 cents per gram.
Whey protein came in the highest at (I think) about 13 cents per gram.

I think. It was a year ago that I did that, I'm just going off memory.

Dan Fanelli
02-28-2011, 07:05 PM
Where the heck do you guys get milk for $2 a gallon. Its like $3-4 here.

*Chicken can be bought pretty cheap, with the skin and bone it will be even cheaper.
*Eggs
*PB
*Tri-tip is a bit pricey but its so good

For eating out, the $1 menus are usually the way to go, or find a mexican restaurant that doesn't cook everything in lard.

f=ma
02-28-2011, 07:13 PM
i dont know where you guys are getting chicken that cheap. i pay like $6/lb.. but it is organic. and yes it tastes better

and what kind of whey costs 13 cents per gram? ON whey costs like 3 cents per gram when you buy the 5lb container

Behemoth
02-28-2011, 07:25 PM
$6/lb is re tard ed to spend on chicken. Organics a quack

Bosch232
02-28-2011, 07:31 PM
OK, I dug up my old post on it. It was from 7/14/10. Text pasted below...


It's interesting that this question has come up, because just two days ago I sat down and calculated the "cost per gram" of protein. They are in this order (cheapest to most expensive, per gram)...

Eggs - 1.8 cents per gram, based upon $1.30 per dozen
Skim milk - 2.3 cents per gram, based upon $2.90 per gallon
Chicken breast - 2.5 cents per gram, based upon $6.50 per 3 lb bag of frozen breasts
93% lean ground beef - 3.1 cents per gram, based upon $2.50 per pound
Protein powder - 3.6 cents per gram, based upon $55.00 per 70 servings at 22 g per serving

You can "dilute" the cost of protein powder down to 3.2 cents per gram if you use skim milk in lieu of water, since you're adding cheap protein to expensive protein. All that being said, protein powder is a mainstay in my diet because it's just so danged convenient and (as Tom Mutaffis said elsewhere) it's easy on the stomach.

Also, this is based upon food pricing in Nebraska. I've lived in CT, NC, FL, and CA, and for whatever economic reasons, NE has cheaper food than anywhere else that I've lived.

Behemoth
02-28-2011, 07:35 PM
Bosch you're comparing apples to oranges. Just because it has protein and is cheap doesn't mean it's comparable to something else. Eggs are much more expensive for protein when you just eat the whites. With milk you get a mixed bag also. It's almost like saying a mcds double cheeseburger could make the list because it cost a buck and has probably 35g of protein

Dan Fanelli
02-28-2011, 09:22 PM
The OP didn't really say what he was looking for with this. He said the spaghetti O's were cheap and they "worked". Is this purely 'bulking' or a 'lean bulk' or health, performance, etc???

I imagine its either a pure 'bulk' or a 'lean bulk'. In that case, you may be better off looking at calories / dollar instead of protein or anything else. And even in that case it wouldn't be that great a way to look at it. Things like rice, and vegetable oils, butter, beans, etc., can be VERY cheap for large quantities of calories, but you wouldn't be taking in huge quantities of these things.

And looking at what Bosch posted I dont think a couple of cents difference per gram of protein is a huge issue. If you are taking in 200g a day, that would be maybe $6 difference per day, but that would be assuming you were only eating one food source.

A gallon of milk for $3 is a good amount of calories for the cost IMO. For others, $3 a day might seem like a lot. The fact is though you can eat 'junk' out for cheap, or you can make healthier alternatives at home for cheap.

Besides all of that, there is the convenience and preference factor to take into account. I have never been able to eat a lot of eggs. Eggs are 6g of protein ea, and if I want to take in a meal with around 40-50g of protein, im looking at about 7-8 eggs. Ive never been able to do that. As Bosch mentioned, protein powders may be a bit more expensive than alternativses, but they are very convenient. If you are already stuffing yourself all day, its very easy to get an extra 40-60g of protein through straight whey with water. Peanut butter is very convenient too. Even if you aren't out on the go, its nice to just have sitting around and you can grab a table spoon or two as a quick snack. And eating out is usually more expensive, so I limit it to a couple of meals per week, but if you are in a hurry, or just want to "treat" yourself, a 1000+kcal fast food meal might be a good option.


I think there is a notion though that the "best" foods, or "clean" foods are very expensive and that doesn't have to be true. You just have to shop around a bit and be willing to compromise your tastes.

ncsuLuke
03-01-2011, 05:32 AM
i dont know where you guys are getting chicken that cheap. i pay like $6/lb.. but it is organic. and yes it tastes better

and what kind of whey costs 13 cents per gram? ON whey costs like 3 cents per gram when you buy the 5lb container

We have a store called Fresh Market and you can get chick with the bone and skin for 3.99/lb and boneless skinless for 4.99/lb. It isn't organic per se but it is no hormones added and all that stuff. Some of the best tasting chicken I have had too.

Bosch232
03-01-2011, 06:16 AM
The OP didn't really say what he was looking for with this. He said the spaghetti O's were cheap and they "worked". Is this purely 'bulking' or a 'lean bulk' or health, performance, etc???


Yeah, I was thinking about that same thing when I was digging around looking for my original post about it. But the conversation seemed to be turning that direction. (I blame it on you guys). :clown:

f=ma
03-01-2011, 09:29 AM
This frustrates me to no end is one of the primary reasons their is obesity in this country.
Processed food is NOT CHEAP, it's easy.

Go to the supermaket, get cabbage, carrots, a bag of frozen chicken breasts, chicken sausagesm eggs, bread, pasta, frozen grean beans/broccoli (broccoli tends to be a bit more expensive), lettuce (not the chopped up stuff, the whole heads), ground beef when it's on sale, peanut butter, oatmeal.

I survive on about $4/day in food, and I eat unbelievably well.

I'd love to see a food list that makes up $4 per day

f=ma
03-01-2011, 09:35 AM
Oh and also... I gladly pay the premium for whole foods organic chicken. Sam's club is ****.... the taste becomes very important to me when eating 2+ lbs per day

Mercuryblade
03-01-2011, 09:59 AM
I'd love to see a food list that makes up $4 per day

Daytime:
A few spoonfuls of yogurt first thing in the morning to get my stomach churning $.10
4 servings whey protein at $.38 each = $1.52
3 peanut butter and jelly sandwiches = ~$1.50 in materials
Baby carrots = $.13
Pre-workout granola bar $.19

Night time
Green Beans = ~$.15 or
Romaine lettuce = ~$.18 per serving (buy a head and chop it yourself, it's not only way tastier it's dirt cheap)
Broccoli = ~$.30
Protein source: Variable - eggs, tuna will run me under a dollar, chicken sausages are a little more expensive and frozen chicken breasts hover around the $1-$2 depending on the size of the breast


If I have tuna or eggs my total food runs just over $4, if I have a large chicken breast with dinner it can push closer to $6.

Some other points:

I don't do protein powder on the weekends, which makes up a large portion of my weekly food cost.

All the stuff I buy is either in bulk from Costco or Trader Joes, hence how inexpensive it all is.

This is a "typical" day for me, read "typical" not every. I would say I adhere to this diet probably 20 days a month, I do splurge on things like a steak, beer, etc. I would say I eat like this about 4-5 days per week. 7 days a week on this diet would drive me insane, but when I do get low on money I've done it.

It's amazing what taking home $18,000/yr after taxes can do to ones spending habits :D

I do have some other meals in my that are really cheap, but I don't really feel like listing them all off right now.

f=ma
03-01-2011, 10:04 AM
i would love to find the magical store where everything costs 1/4th of what i pay

Mercuryblade
03-01-2011, 10:26 AM
i would love to find the magical store where everything costs 1/4th of what i pay

Costco and Trader Joes, as mentioned per my post.

You spend $16/day on food? :)

r2473
03-01-2011, 10:38 AM
Costco and Trader Joes, as mentioned per my post.

Exactly. And the quality of almost everything is better than most places.

The meat at my local "grass fed" is good and the prices are more than reasonable. I really like the chicken.

http://www.utahnaturalmeat.com/pricing

My grandma raised chickens when I was young. Truly fresh eggs and fresh chicken is amazing compared to the crap in the market.

The guy who ran the elevator in my hometown worked for years to develop a cross-bred pig that was AMAZING. I have never tasted anything like it before or since. Our hogs were not in the same ballpark.

During the summer, I have access to community gardens and a "real" farmers market, so fresh produce is in abundance.

Eating well isn't that difficult or expensive, as long as you search out the places to shop, plan well, and like to cook.

f=ma
03-01-2011, 12:48 PM
Costco and Trader Joes, as mentioned per my post.

You spend $16/day on food? :)

Costco near me is 3/lb for chicken breast. Way more than 16. And it shrinks... tastes like anus compared to whole foods

phlkyu01
03-03-2011, 07:09 PM
Watching your wallet and your waistline can be tricky. Eating right is easy when money is no object, but a trip to the supermarket often yields frustration for healthy eaters on a budget which is most of us!.

Fruits, vegetables, whole grains and lean protein are on your list, but they're so much pricier than Ramen noodles, frozen pizzas and bottles of soda! :)

IronRanger
03-04-2011, 03:42 PM
Rice and beans form complete proteins. Grains and beans together form whole proteins, so refried beans and tortillas...bean burritos made from homemade refried beans and homemade tortillas.

Tuna, cream of mushroom soup and spaghetti. Or just tuna, butter and spaghetti. Bean soup, throw in leftover chicken.