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Hobo Beard
02-28-2011, 10:59 PM
As I have been reflecting a lot lately, the past few days have found me thinking about all the motivation I've had for the past 13 years to push harder and harder every workout, every week, every month and every year to get stronger.

This poem came to my mind:

Strength Lacking Strength

Strength from hate,
Hate from anger,
Anger from anxiety,
Anxiety from insecurity,
Insecurity from lacking,
From lacking strength.

Looking back, I've realized I was always motivated by hate and anger, but never really examined why.

Ironically, I've concluded actually being a weak man made me compensate by obsessing with continually getting stronger.

Then on here I see many family men (who I'm assuming are happy--I hope) also always pushing their strength and made me think there has to be a different motivation I'm missing.

So, my question for guy is: What motivates/pushes you in progressing in powerlifting?

Brian Hopper
03-01-2011, 12:48 AM
To be the strongest that I can be and wanting to push my body to the max.

NickAus
03-01-2011, 02:27 AM
I love life but I have a lot of anger at the same time, I like to get the anger out and test myself with weights and I ****ing love speed work like speed pulls and speed squats etc.........I get to display some power/anger and it does not hurt anyone.

I have to do something physical.

Kiff
03-01-2011, 02:41 AM
So when I am an old man I can smile and know that when I was young I at least gave one thing in the world my complete an unsecured attention and commitment. No one, no disease, no situation will ever be able to take what I achieve or have achieved in the gym or at a competition away from me.

Clone
03-01-2011, 05:33 AM
I believe life is all about progression.

We should constantly become smarter, faster, stronger, better at everything possible. Whether it be as a person or in whatever hobbies we choose.

Lifting is perfect for gauging progress.

Off Road
03-01-2011, 07:11 AM
1. To keep my wife interested
2. To be somebody that my young kids look up to
3. To be strong enough to handle my kids in their late teens :)
4. To be an inspiration to my kids as they enter adulthood
5. To not grow old gracefully, but be strong and fit all the way to the Old Folks Home.

Paul Sousa
03-01-2011, 07:37 AM
I find things that interest me and then always want to try and push myself with whatever it is. Before strength training I started playing soccer at age 26. I quickly became obsessed and eventually was playing 3-4 times per week minimum and afte a couple years I got to the point I could hang with the better players in the better leagues in my area. Then some stupid crap happened within the group of people I played with and I lost interest. I started going to the gym after that and fell in love with still being able to push myself to continually get better, but there was nobody but me to take credit or take blame for success or failure.

Dan Fanelli
03-01-2011, 08:41 AM
I believe life is all about progression.

We should constantly become smarter, faster, stronger, better at everything possible. Whether it be as a person or in whatever hobbies we choose.

Lifting is perfect for gauging progress.

This..... If we aren't striving to move forward from day to day, then we are already dead.

shocker4221
03-01-2011, 09:03 AM
So when I am an old man I can smile and know that when I was young I at least gave one thing in the world my complete an unsecured attention and commitment. No one, no disease, no situation will ever be able to take what I achieve or have achieved in the gym or at a competition away from me.

very well said

hug dog
03-01-2011, 09:26 AM
I have the same goals as many on here:

Be healthy
Be strong
Look good
Have fun
Keep busy (stay out of trouble)
Sleep better
Be happy

I have always had a very strong big father and now we are thinking about children, I want to be thought of the same way.

I want my family to look to me for strength and protection.

K-R-M
03-01-2011, 10:35 AM
I just want a big deadlift.

Athos
03-01-2011, 11:22 AM
The feeling from setting a new PR is like nothing else in the world for me, it drives me to work as hard as I can to experience that feeling again. I don't care if I have to get under a heavy ass bar several times a week, keep a strict diet and work through injuries - it is completely worth it.

Brian C
03-01-2011, 11:48 AM
I use my wife and kids as my inspiration and motivation. Besides the family oriented stuff already mentioned, I visualize my family watching me on the platform. This gets my blood racing as I will not let them see me fail. I want to do it for them, to be proud....if you can understand that.

Brian C
03-01-2011, 11:52 AM
My wife and kids are my motivation. I visualize myself on the platform and them watching. I do not want to fail. I want to make them proud...if you can understand that

mchicia1
03-01-2011, 11:53 AM
1. To keep my wife interested
2. To be somebody that my young kids look up to
3. To be strong enough to handle my kids in their late teens :)
4. To be an inspiration to my kids as they enter adulthood
5. To not grow old gracefully, but be strong and fit all the way to the Old Folks Home.

I don't have any kids yet, but these are some of the reasons I do it. I want to set a good example for my kids. Plus I just enjoy competing in general and I know I won't be able to compete well at a future meet unless I bust my ass.

There is also that nice feeling you get knowing you are stronger than 95% of the normal population :).

JK1
03-01-2011, 12:19 PM
To see if I can do it....

I was diagnosed with insulin dependant diabetes almost 25 years ago. My father died from that disease when I was 5 years old, on the living room floor. My last memory of him is my mother and my aunt doing CPR....

I started lifting weights when I was 15 with the idea of becoming the next Tim Belknap and a probodybuilder. I'm smart enough to realize that I don't have the genetics for that, but I do have the genetics to get strong as hell. So, thats what got me started powerlifting in college. School got me away from the platform through my mid 20's into my mid 30s. A couple of years ago, i was told I might have a brain tumor. The doctors basically scared the **** out of me.

I responded to them by getting under the bar and pushing... back onto the platform with my first full meet in years where i squatted 690, benched 515 and deadlifted 500.... that was the new beginning. I've beaten the crap out of myself through the years with too many injuries to list, but they have all healed and I'm stronger now than I've ever been.

I'm now in my late 30's, have been a doctor for 10 years, have a decient carrer, have a great wife, have my own garage gym, still have diabetes, never had a brain tumor and most importantly, I have the feeling I'm still not at my peak..... so I will keep pushing until I get there. Right now, the next goal is 2100+ in single ply, then going for a pro total in multipy. Why? Because I can.

mikesbench
03-01-2011, 02:00 PM
This is really an interesting thing to think about, and I haven't given it much thought in the past. I started out lifting to get bigge and stronger for sports, I always loved sports and competition; most guys I train with tell me I'm a bit obsessively competitive. I'm always checking the #'s in my weight class, and when a training partner outlifts me I don't care that they outweigh me by 100 lbs. So I guess this sport is just a natural outlet for my competitiveness.

I also didn't realize powerlifting existed until my last year of high school. By that time I realized that I enjoyed training for sports more than I enjoyed the sports themselves. When I found out that I could compete in lifting it really filled the athletic void that I would have felt following high school sports. So again powerlifting became a natural fit.

So the reason I compete in powerlifting seems to be that it fell into my lap and kind of chose me more than the other way around. I really just can't picture not doing this, it's an integral part of who I view myself as. So I suppose why I continue is for self respect, competitiveness, and just pure enjoyment of the sport.

4g64fiero
03-01-2011, 02:13 PM
As previously stated, the feeling I get when setting PRs that I know I busted my ass for is one of the best feelings ever. Its a brief moment of relief I would never otherwise obtain. Other than that, I work out for health to take care of my loved ones. Like the op, anger got me into the gym originally. It's other things that keep me there.

theBarzeen
03-01-2011, 02:53 PM
lifting weights gave me confidence when I was young and taught me to work through setbacks.

I learned dedication, self control, and what hard work really is.

Powerlifting is the natural progression going up from being king of the local gym rats...... and bodybuilding is kind of gay.

That, and my wife competes too..... gym time is now quality time that we both look forward to.

K.Huget
03-01-2011, 03:36 PM
It's not about how good I look with a shirt off, it's about how amazing I FEEL with a weight on my back or in my hands that i've never lifted before.

ScottYard
03-02-2011, 04:49 AM
Good question. Im not sure on my answer though. This is who I am,more then what I do.

killxswitch
03-02-2011, 09:41 AM
I don't really have a system of thought for this and don't think I want one. I'd rather it just be something I do. I recognize the benefits physically and I like progressing but I don't want to look at it as a hobby or whatever because I flit from one hobby to the next all the time and that is a huge waste of time when it comes to weight training. And I don't really derive my self-worth from it either (which is good considering my low numbers, heh). I am fine with who I am as a person but I'd just like to be stronger and more physically capable in general, so I'm lifting weights to do that.

Brian Hopper
03-02-2011, 05:43 PM
I use my wife and kids as my inspiration and motivation. Besides the family oriented stuff already mentioned, I visualize my family watching me on the platform. This gets my blood racing as I will not let them see me fail. I want to do it for them, to be proud....if you can understand that.

You can't argue with that.

I totally understand where your coming from B!!!!!

mastermonster
03-03-2011, 07:10 PM
With me it has been a cumulation of things over the years (41 years of training). To say I love it would be a huge understatement! At 1st it was to be a better football player and to immulate the two people who most physically impressed me in my younger years; My uncle Harold Bohannon (retired Full Colonel U.S. Army) and my high school football coach H.K. Reeves. They were the two biggest and strongest men, and lifters; I knew. My uncle Harold bought me my 1st set of weights when I was 14. It was a 110 lbs. set from Sears. He loaded all 110 lbs. and did 10 reps of one arm overhead presses with it. He looked at me and said, "when you can do that you're a man"! He was a 6'2" 260 lb. Green Baret (2 tours in Vietnam - 1 in Cambodia). I became a man by his standards when I was 23! LOL! Coach Reeves was a 6'4" 245 lb. former DT with Arkansas State and the Dallas Cowboys. He is also a distant cousin. So, for me strength and lifting were almost a family legacy. I lifted all the way through football and when that was over I kept lifting and got into bodybuilding through my best friend Danny Harbison. A few years later another friend, Joe Hood (former 220 World Record holder in the Deadlift) ; got me interested in powerlifting.

The other factor is that all my life I've felt driven to try to be the best at something. 1st it was football. I was very good and even had some pro and semi-pro experience. Then I took a shot at a singing and writing career and had a song hit the radio charts in 1998. Again, very good; but didn't make it to the top. When I got back into powerlifting competition in 2001 I set out to see if this would be where I might be considered as one of the best 'masters' powerlifters ever. That is what still drives me. Through surgeries and setbacks and 'old man' pain and all; to be the best in my division and hopefully someday the best overall (by coefficient) master lifter ever. I've been ranked at or near the top of the masters 2 (over 50) for the last 4 years now and I don't see myself retiring any time soon. As they say, it's in my blood!

torch1980
03-11-2011, 03:43 PM
My kids

SELK
03-11-2011, 03:59 PM
I lift because its fun, and if I didn't lift, what else would I do with my time?

BigBassBo
03-11-2011, 05:28 PM
On a psychological level, I lift due to an inferiority complex, which states that I must better myself relatives to others. I also lift as a way to achieve self actualization. And in Freudian Theory, I would be satisfying my Id and my Ego every time I lifted a huge weight.

On a cognitive level, I lift because I enjoy it immensely and it greatly improves my athletic endeavors. I also use it as a way to strive towards my ultimate goal of being a true renaissance man. :evillaugh:

GazzyG
03-12-2011, 04:46 AM
Because I was never one for sports when I was younger. Now I'm a bit older, I've finally found something that I'm really interested in and have a little talent for. I'm gonna pursue it and pursue it. I'm not gonna settle for being mediocre at it.

SEOINAGE
03-13-2011, 10:35 AM
Source of my strength is my belly.

theBarzeen
03-13-2011, 03:02 PM
Source of my strength is my belly.

That's called " bench press technique"