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View Full Version : When sumo deadlifting, shoulders behind bar, or over bar?



imc_1121
05-12-2011, 08:25 AM
When sumo deadlifting, at the start position, the shoulders have to be over the bar or behind it?

AdamBAG
05-12-2011, 08:41 AM
In my opinion, your shoulders are always going to be directly over the bar when you start the pull. I now some people teach getting the shoulders "behind" the bar, but when you pull the bar off the ground it will be right below the shoulders, assuming you pull the bar into your body properly.

I think the key pulling sumo is to get your chest up and keeping your back arch to pop it off the floor. If you get too far forward there is no way you'll lock it out.

Brian Hopper
05-12-2011, 08:41 AM
I feel comfortable pulling with my shoulders behind the bar. I'm sure somebody will be able to explain a little bit better. This is coming from a conventional puller, lol.

imc_1121
05-12-2011, 08:59 AM
I feel comfortable pulling with my shoulders behind the bar. I'm sure somebody will be able to explain a little bit better. This is coming from a conventional puller, lol.

In your case, you feel comfortable with shoulders behind bar, both in conventional and sumo style?

Brian Hopper
05-12-2011, 09:16 AM
In your case, you feel comfortable with shoulders behind bar, both in conventional and sumo style?

No, only when I pull sumo. When I pull conventional I sort of keep them over the bar. So it's different for both styles. But this is what makes me feel comfortable. I've tried pulling conventional and keeping my shoulders behing the bar but I don't like it.

IMO, do what works for you and what makes you comfortable. Next time you pull heavy, try doing both and see what you like and what helps you lift the most weight.

Good luck!!!

AdamBAG
05-12-2011, 09:19 AM
Let me clarify somewhat b/c I think Brian and I may be talking about the same thing. I was saying that the bar will be directly below your shoulders at arms length with your chest up as opposed to behind the bar. The difference isn't going to be much.

Brian Hopper
05-12-2011, 09:24 AM
Let me clarify somewhat b/c I think Brian and I may be talking about the same thing. I was saying that the bar will be directly below your shoulders at arms length with your chest up as opposed to behind the bar. The difference isn't going to be much.

I think that's exactly what I was trying to say, lol. I'm never good at putting things into words, i'm alot better at showing. Thanks Adam!!!

NickAus
05-12-2011, 03:50 PM
I start the pull with shoulders in front of bar then as I pull and the bar breaks the ground my shoulders will be only slightly in front.

I agree that doing what is comfortable is good, as you move more and more weight you will work out the best technique.........and then it will change as your strengths change.

SplitQuick
05-13-2011, 03:07 PM
I can only say what I've heard/watched/learned. But according to a few trainers I read about a lot, they seem to say that it's not your choice. lol

Basically, even if you start with your shoulders in front of the bar, as soon as you start the lift, it's going to assume a position to be directly under your scapula whether you like it or not (this is assuming there is enough weight on the bar). Rippetoe once said to even watch Olympic lifters that start with the bar in front of their shoulders. He said upon observing them, as soon as the weight broke the floor, it would track back to be directly under their scapula. So he challenged his seminar audience with basically "Why start the lift from an inefficient position? If the bar is going to track back under your scapula once it breaks the ground, then why not start with the bar under your scapula to begin with?" Not an exact quote just trying to remember what he said loosely.

ScottYard
05-13-2011, 05:51 PM
Mostly preference. The only golden rule is to constantly be pulling back.

Hazerboy
05-13-2011, 05:55 PM
http://www.crossfit.com/journal/library/51-2006_AnalysisofDeadlift.pdf


look at the first picture. Whether your start with your shoulders behind the bar or over it, deadlift sumo or conventional, simple mechanics assures that this will happen as you pull.