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View Full Version : Maintenance cals versus building



alert20
05-21-2011, 12:40 PM
Does it take less calories to maintain a certain bodyweight than to get there in the first place? For example if you went from 175 to 195 would it take less cals to maintain 195 than to get there first.

Behemoth
05-21-2011, 01:01 PM
The calories that will maintain his 195 would have eventually got him there (albeit very slowly).

JacobH
05-21-2011, 05:23 PM
So this may be a very stupid question and late realization. But, as one increases their bodyweight on a bulk, the amount of calories needed to keep the same rate of growth would have to gradually increase? And taking me personally as an example, I have bulked from 145 to 175, my caloric intake to maintain 175lbs would be more than to maintain 145lbs right? I guess I thought the body would maintain it's weight at any weight with the same amount of cals. I think I'm just confusing myself.

Off Road
05-21-2011, 05:26 PM
If you add an extra 1,000 calories, you will start gaining weight until you reach a weight where that extra 1,000 calories is your maintenance.

An example using bogus numbers...
You weigh 150 lbs and eat 2,000 calories
You raise your calories to 3,000
You gain weight to say 200 lbs.
If you continue to eat 3,000 calories, you will remain at 200 lbs.

JacobH
05-21-2011, 05:35 PM
Ok that is very logical. Probably why I was confused. :) Thanks alot Off Road I guess it's time to bump up the calories.

Behemoth
05-21-2011, 07:44 PM
Yes. The old advice "eat like the weight you're trying to be" is shit advice unless the weight you're trying to be is relatively close to the weight you currently are. Move in incriments both ways.

ZAR-FIT
05-23-2011, 12:40 AM
Once you've platued your weight for a few weeks its time to up those calories. But this is not something you want to do drastically. I've seen guys who will add anothe 1000 cals to their diet and just start packing on fat. I like to add 500-600 cals and wait. Sometimes I this wait could last a week, sometimes longer, but you don't want to overload your body and force it to just store fat.
I also pay attention to my appetite. If I feel I'm getting hungrier and hungrier I will feed it, especially when trying to gain muscle. Meaning I could add another 500 calorie snack or split the 500 cals up and add them to two existing meals.
Adding calories does two noticable things to me. In the past I added too much to one meal or too many calories at once and I noticed after eating I am very lethargic, lazy, and gassy. So now I spread out those extra calories wisely, mostly with the meals surrounding my workouts. My energy is great and I dont get that bloat anymore.