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K-R-M
07-08-2011, 10:52 PM
I have a good non stick pan that I use to cook my meat with vegetables.

I normally buy the leanest ground beef that I can at the market, which is not that lean. For 100g of raw beef, I get 20gs of protein and 10gs of fat as my macros. I normally let it cook in either trace amounts of sesame/olive oil for quite a while. A lot of the satured fats seem to liquify and/or evaporate.

Is this loss negligeable or do you take it into account in your macros? For example, a 100g portion of raw beef cooked this way, how many grams of fat would I reduce from my target macros, if any?


Thanks guys.

BallsWideDeep
07-18-2011, 09:26 AM
liquify-yes
evaporate-no

You will never get an exact answer. This might help:

http://www.beefnutrition.org/CMDocs/BeefNutrition/ReducingFatinCookedGroundBeef.pdf

4g64fiero
07-18-2011, 01:42 PM
OP I feel your pain.

How many calories are in bacon after it's fried?

If I fry bacon then fry eggs in the left over grease do I just count the calories as bacon+eggs or is it now bacon+fried eggs? There is no extra fat added, but I dont know if the nutrition facts take into consideration the common preparation methods which would account for the loss of bacon fat during preparation of the fried bacon thus leading to a need to account for the gained fat from frying the eggs in that bacon fat.


HOW DEEP DOES THE RABBIT HOLE GO?!!!!


I just want my breakfast. I have stopped worrying about it and just counted calories consistently albeit possibly not accurately. I have still been successful in losing weight. I simply adjust until things work. At that point, how many calories are in what becomes a moot point.

K-R-M
07-18-2011, 01:57 PM
4g64fiero,

I don't care that much, it doesn't change really change anything to me since the quantities I use are always the same. I was curious about it and hoped some of the more meticulous posters here took this into account.



liquify-yes
evaporate-no

You will never get an exact answer. This might help:

http://www.beefnutrition.org/CMDocs/BeefNutrition/ReducingFatinCookedGroundBeef.pdf


You can cook meat in it's own fat = it comes to a boil. If it comes to a boil, it evaporates.

4g64fiero
07-18-2011, 02:39 PM
4g64fiero,

I don't care that much, it doesn't change really change anything to me since the quantities I use are always the same. I was curious about it and hoped some of the more meticulous posters here took this into account.





You can cook meat in it's own fat = it comes to a boil. If it comes to a boil, it evaporates.
I also really want to know. I am not mocking you if thats what you think.

K-R-M
07-19-2011, 01:50 AM
I also really want to know. I am not mocking you if thats what you think.

Makes sense man. I didn't think you were mocking, I thought you were saying it didn't really matter (and I agreed, sort of). Good job on the weight loss btw.

IronRanger
07-19-2011, 09:55 AM
Fat melts, it doesn't evaporate.

jAy_Dub
07-19-2011, 11:27 AM
If you want to get rid of fat in ground beef its very simple.

Rinse it!

I read a study once (I'll look for it later), that after rinsing 80% ground beef you can get it down to about 2-4 grams of fat per 4 oz. serving (I cant remember the exact number, very low though).

So cook up your ground beef, put it in a strainer and rinse. Very effective when dieting, I did it all the time during my prep.

IronRanger
07-19-2011, 11:54 AM
Yea, I rinsed mine too. Don't rinse it down the drain unless you want problems with your pipes clogging or septic drain field problems (like having all the dirt removed and replaced - very expensive).

I use a wire mesh colander that I place over a small pail or bowl. I place the pail in the fridge afterwards. All the grease solidifies on top of the water.

Here's the link for rinsing burger and the average nutritional values:

http://www.hillbillyhousewife.com/reducedfatgroundbeef.htm

BallsWideDeep
07-21-2011, 08:11 AM
While it is possible that a small portion of oil can evaporate at higher temperatures it is absurd to suggest this would appreciably lower the fat content of ground beef. You would sooner break down the oil, decrease the smoke point, and release carcinogens in to you food.

Again, like the first response, rinse it if you want.