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MISTER
07-15-2011, 08:53 PM
was looking through some articles i saved. what do you all think? sorry about the length.


Maximum Effort, Dynamic Effort, and Repetition Method Pull Up and Dip Training

By James Smith


In 2003, while training a U.S. Navy SEAL who was preparing for a highly specialized selection course, I adapted the Westside Barbell Method to pull up and dip training. As a special operations commando, much of a team guy’s training and operational challenges (e.g., calisthenic/weight training, rope climbs, O-courses, fast roping, caving ladders, etc.) require great relative upper body strength. Thus, the ability to easily manipulate one’s own bodyweight, in addition to external resistance, by way of the various articulations the shoulder girdle and elbow joints is a fundamental requirement for any team guy. Additionally, one of the main training goals was to increase his performance of max pull up repetitions with a 25lb weight, as he would be tested on this very drill at some point during selection. Accordingly, the development of pull up limit strength, as well as explosive strength, would prove to be very beneficial.

The importance of relative upper body strength and power, however, is surely not limited to special operations commandos. Wrestling and Mixed Martial Arts are two sports which have a tremendous requirement for these motor qualities.

In regards to the WSB method, I considered the full range pull up and dip to be the ‘competitive’ lifts, which are analogous to a powerlifter’s utilization of the squat, bench, and deadlift as the competitive lifts. Accordingly, I created a pool of special exercises which served to build up the competitive lifts (pull ups and dips).

The ME, DE, and Repetition method were utilized for the purposes of building limit strength, speed strength/explosive strength and muscle elasticity, and increasing specific muscle cross-section in the upper body musculature. In this case, however, the ME and DE were realized by means of limit pull up and dip variations and speed pull up variations and dips.

The logic for the pull up and dip development, via ME, DE, Supplemental and Assistance lifts, is the same as it applies to the bench press, squat, or deadlift. For example:

In regards to Westside, a certain ME lift (e.g., floor press) is utilized to build special strength for the competition bench press. The ME lift is then followed by a supplemental exercise, usually for chest or triceps (e.g., DB press, BB board press, or DB triceps extensions). The supplemental exercise serves to develop the prime mover of the ME lift which, in the case of the bench press, is the triceps. The supplemental lift may be performed either heavy for low repetitions or lighter for higher repetitions depending on the needs of the lifter. The supplemental lift is followed by assistance lifts which serve to develop the muscle groups which act as antagonists, stabilizers, and synergists to the pressing muscles (e.g., latissimus, deltoids, upper back, biceps, etc.) Lastly, the DE lift (e.g., bench press) is performed as the classical lift itself.

Thus, the same logic applied to pull up and dip development is as follows:

Training Parameters for Pull up Training

ME Lifts:
Full or Partial Range Weighted Pull/Chin Up variation Work up to a 1-5RM

DE Pull/Chin Ups:
Dynamic full range pull/chin up Bodyweight 8-10 sets of 3 repetitions
Ballistic pull/chin up, bodyweight for 8-10 sets of 3 repetitions (Release and re-engage bar at the top of the lift, or launch yourself up and off of the pull up bar and reset for each repetition)

Supplemental Lifts:
Biceps Exercise for 3-6 sets of 3-max repetitions
Full or partial range, weighted or bodyweight, Pull/Chin up variation for 3-6 sets of 3-max repetitions
Barbell/DB/Cable row for 3-6 sets of 3-max repetitions

Assistance Lifts:
Shrug variation (antagonist lift/scapular elevation)
Rear Delt/Upper back lift Row variation
External rotations

Training Parameters for Dip Training

ME Lifts:
Full or Partial Range Weighted Dip variation, work up to a 1-5RM

DE Dips:
Dynamic bodyweight Dip for 8-10 sets of 3 repetitions
Ballistic bodyweight Dip for 8-10 sets of 3 repetitions (Release and re-engage dip bars at the top of each lift, or project yourself up and off of the dip bars and reset between each repetition)

Supplemental Lifts:
Full or partial range, weighted or bodyweight Dip for 3-6 sets for 3-6 sets of 3-max repetitions
Heavy Triceps pressing movement for 3-6 sets of 3-6 repetitions

Assistance Lifts:
Chest press/fly variation
Shoulder press/raise variation
Triceps extension/push down variation

If the pull up and dip workouts are to be performed as separate workouts on separate days then the assistance lifts, in contrast to the Westside method, will target the same muscle groups which contribute to the primary lift. The reason for this is that the muscle groups which contribute to the pull and dip are antagonists. Thus, all lifts for each workout may be specific to the primary lift’s prime movers because the pull up and dip workouts will compliment each other and build equal development of agonists and antagonists. In view of that, we are left with pulling (pull up) and pressing (dip) days. For example:

Monday: ME Pull Up
Tuesday: OFF
Wednesday: ME Dip
Thursday: OFF
Friday: DE Pull Up
Saturday: OFF
Sunday: DE Dip

Alternatively, if the athlete selects to combine pull up and dip work into the same workout, the assistance lifts may then diversify and target the antagonists, stabilizers, and synergists to the primary lifts.

Additionally, for various reasons, the lifter may select to combine ME and DE work, for pull up and dip training, to same training days. For example: A ME pull up lift followed by DE dip sets followed by assistance work for both lifts. Subsequently, another day would be include a ME dip lift followed by DE pull up sets followed by more assistance work for both lifts.

Much like the many variations of manipulating the WSB split for Powerlifting, there are also many methods in which one may manipulate the training template for developing pull up and dip strength. As always, it is the responsibility of the coach/athlete to determine the optimal systematizing and sequencing of training parameters relative to the specific needs of the athlete.

ME and Supplemental Pull up Variations For ME work, pick one and work up to a 1-5 rep max with weight attached to a dip belt.

Partial Range Pull Ups (pronated grip) (Place various height blocks under your feet that put you at three different joint angles. One that allows for a � range pull up, another that allows for a � range pull up, and a third one that allows for a � range pull up)
Close Grip
Med Grip
Wide Grip
Sternum pull up

Partial Range Chin Ups (supinated grip)
Close Grip
Med Grip
Sternum

Partial Range Neutral Grip Pull Up (palms facing each other)
Close Grip (V grip handle)
Med Grip
Wide Grip (no wider than shoulder width)

Partial Range Towel Pull Ups (Roll up a towel and throw it over a bar or set of bars, great for grip strength)
Close
Med
Wide (no wider than shoulder width)

Full Range Pull Ups
Med Grip
Close
Wide

Chin up
Close
Med

Neutral Grip
Close
Med
Wide (no wider than shoulder width)

Towel Pull Up
Close
Med
Wide (no wider than shoulder width)

Sub-Scapularis Pull Up

Sternum Chin Up

Sternum Pull up

This equates to 28 different pull/chin up variations, not including specific joint angles (e.g., block height). Thus, if you multiply 28 X 4 (1/4, �, �, and full range) you have a total of 112 different variations of max effort pull-ups

ME and Supplemental Dip Variations For ME work, pick one and work up to a 1-5 rep max with weight attached to a dip belt.

Partial Range Dips
(place various height blocks under your feet that put you at three different joint angles. One that allows for a � range dip, another that allows for a � range dip and a third one that allows for a � range dip)

Parallel dip bars
Tapered dip bars
Forward trunk lean (more pectoral involvement)
Vertical posture (less pectoral involvement)

Full Range Dips

Parallel dip bars
Tapered dip bars
Forward trunk lean
Vertical posture

According to the dip variations presented above, there are 16 variations available. Though not as abundant as the pull up variations, this is still an adequate pool of special exercises to draw from.

The material presented above was systematized and sequenced in order to train the commando referenced in the beginning of this abstract. The training effect yielded from this derivative of the Westside template was substantial. Prior to the onset of engaging in this type of training the individual was performing under 8-10 pull ups with a 25lb weight at approximately 180lbs bodyweight. After approximately 12 weeks of training his performance increased to 23 pull ups with a 25lb weight at just over 190lbs bodyweight. More importantly for him, however, he performed extremely well and passed the selection course. Additionally, it is worth noting that we also implemented lower back/lower body training in accordance with many of the Westside principles, however, for the purposes of this abstract only the upper body training parameters have been illustrated.

It is highly recommended that any individual seeking to improve upon their relative upper body strength and power, as manifested through pull up and dip variations, to consider the presented material.

NickAus
07-16-2011, 02:24 AM
Squat bench deadlift.

Brian C
07-16-2011, 10:04 AM
What are your goals? If its powerlifting, this aint the answer. Pullup/dips are great accessories, but not main lifts.

MISTER
07-16-2011, 05:45 PM
I don't plan on doing this. currently doing 5/3/1 for powerlifting. Just wanted to see what people had to say about it. Also i am a dip fanatic.