PDA

View Full Version : I just saw this..... and was amazed.



theBarzeen
07-30-2011, 04:23 PM
I just saw this video today..... and it blew my mind.

http://youtu.be/U-IVOjLXsNc

this kid is a bad ass and my hero.... look how focussed she is before her lifts!

chevelle2291
07-30-2011, 07:47 PM
I just saw this video today..... and it blew my mind.

http://youtu.be/U-IVOjLXsNc

this kid is a bad ass and my hero.... look how focussed she is before her lifts!

Impressive, however I have my doubts when it comes to kids lifting at such a young age. I have no scientific evidence to support my stance, I just have a feeling that heavy lifting at that age is detrimental in some aspect.

NickAus
07-30-2011, 08:19 PM
So is smoking and taking drugs etc........worse.

theBarzeen
07-30-2011, 10:14 PM
Impressive, however I have my doubts when it comes to kids lifting at such a young age. I have no scientific evidence to support my stance, I just have a feeling that heavy lifting at that age is detrimental in some aspect.

the same thought ran through my head..... but the good seems to outweigh the bad. How many other girls are going to go to middle school with the confidence in themselves that this kid has?

Form seems pretty good too.... especially considering how hard it is to coach kids that young.


With that said: she's not my kid to worry about. I just thought that it was cool to see.

thecityalive
07-31-2011, 01:04 PM
I love how she lifts in work boots.

WaNNaB3Bigg3r
07-31-2011, 06:12 PM
Wow very very strong

Niko_El_Piko
07-31-2011, 06:18 PM
I think its insane to even consider a 9 year old girl (or boy) practicing powerlifting!

Alex.V
07-31-2011, 06:20 PM
the same thought ran through my head..... but the good seems to outweigh the bad. How many other girls are going to go to middle school with the confidence in themselves that this kid has?



Very young athletes are some of the highest risk for developing eating disorders later in life... among a whole host of other issues. (chronic knee injuries are some of the most common...).

Just sayin.

thecityalive
07-31-2011, 07:33 PM
So, is she on the juice?

Bee_Brian
08-01-2011, 03:45 PM
I think you can be as young a 1-year old and NOT experience any negative effects of lifting heavy...

lol. Humans are built to SKWAT! It is what our anatomy is designed for.

thecityalive
08-01-2011, 06:10 PM
But seriously, I've seen kids come into crossfit and just OH squat for form with a PVC pipe and MAYBE, MAYBE a 35 BB. Granted these kids are like ~10 or so, but I don't really see a problem with a light load like that. I do, however, have this odd gut feeling that a 9 y/o lifting that much isn't all too great for a child's development. Perhaps it's all the repetition of the typical "you will stunt your growth" or "your growth plates will be shot" that has been engraved into my head at younger ages.

But lets be real, when should a 9 y/o girl EVER lift 200#? Shouldn't they be drinking out of a water hose, or getting into trouble with neighborhood kids? I remember playing hockey at around 9 or so, and just having to carry my equipment around to morning practices. Not that heavy, PLUS, I had to skate my ass off in practice with that weight any way (~20 to ~30 #) and I turned out fine.

This kind of reminds me of that Richard Sandrak kid who was "the worlds strongest kid" (and not to mention ugliest) at a REAL REAL young age of about 4 or so. Granted, his parents were crazy and stretched the crap out of him and basically "influenced" his life then, but looking at the kid's youtube channel now, he looks aprox 6 feet tall and seems to be doing well (physically/ health).

This kind of debate will ALWAYS be touchy, but you can just expect me to sit back in my chair eating popcorn watching people debate this forever.

Bee_Brian
08-01-2011, 06:33 PM
But seriously, I've seen kids come into crossfit and just OH squat for form with a PVC pipe and MAYBE, MAYBE a 35 BB. Granted these kids are like ~10 or so, but I don't really see a problem with a light load like that. I do, however, have this odd gut feeling that a 9 y/o lifting that much isn't all too great for a child's development. Perhaps it's all the repetition of the typical "you will stunt your growth" or "your growth plates will be shot" that has been engraved into my head at younger ages.

But lets be real, when should a 9 y/o girl EVER lift 200#? Shouldn't they be drinking out of a water hose, or getting into trouble with neighborhood kids? I remember playing hockey at around 9 or so, and just having to carry my equipment around to morning practices. Not that heavy, PLUS, I had to skate my ass off in practice with that weight any way (~20 to ~30 #) and I turned out fine.

This kind of reminds me of that Richard Sandrak kid who was "the worlds strongest kid" (and not to mention ugliest) at a REAL REAL young age of about 4 or so. Granted, his parents were crazy and stretched the crap out of him and basically "influenced" his life then, but looking at the kid's youtube channel now, he looks aprox 6 feet tall and seems to be doing well (physically/ health).

This kind of debate will ALWAYS be touchy, but you can just expect me to sit back in my chair eating popcorn watching people debate this forever.

WEIGHTLIFTING FOR KIDS STUNT GROWTH + THAT IS BULLSHIT!!!!! = Richard Sandrak



I checked out one of his newer pics. Not doing bad:

http://www.google.com/imgres?q=richard+sandrak+now+2011&um=1&hl=en&rlz=1R2ADFA_enUS438&biw=1600&bih=678&tbm=isch&tbnid=51mnnb7izlcxcM:&imgrefurl=http://forum.bodybuilding.com/showthread.php%253Ft%253D128826521&docid=TcmHPL-BPgFKdM&w=261&h=400&ei=6TY3ToPeBqbZiALAu6XJDg&zoom=1&iact=rc&dur=95&page=1&tbnh=131&tbnw=85&start=0&ndsp=41&ved=1t:429,r:1,s:0&tx=41&ty=73

thecityalive
08-01-2011, 06:56 PM
His stomach still looks like a vagina.

powerlifter62
08-01-2011, 07:10 PM
I just saw this video today..... and it blew my mind.

http://youtu.be/U-IVOjLXsNc

this kid is a bad ass and my hero.... look how focussed she is before her lifts!

I wouldn't refer to my daughter as a "badass" but her focus, intensity and psyche were really impressive. Her world record squat was phenomenal, but if you really want to see intensity, look at her deadlifts:

http://youtu.be/rhYvtnOR7WI

It wasn't a world record, but let me tell you about her 3rd attempt. You may notice that on the second, with 185, she was losing her grip. She didn't think she had much more. I had her widen her grip out so she wasn't holding the smooth part of the bar (it was her first competition using a sumo stance). Now, an adjustment at the competition is never easy, but she went with it really well. Also, I convinced her to try 195 (she wanted 190, but I thought she could get 200). So, she got over her nervousness that she would drop it, and went out there with tremendous intensity and got it. And you can see the intensity on her face as she pulled it. So, I can see where those other than her parents could see her as a "badass".

powerlifter62
08-01-2011, 07:11 PM
So, is she on the juice?

No (but you knew that). Not even any supplements.

thecityalive
08-01-2011, 07:21 PM
No (but you knew that). Not even any supplements.
I did know that. Was making a stereotypical joke.

powerlifter62
08-01-2011, 07:22 PM
Very young athletes are some of the highest risk for developing eating disorders later in life... among a whole host of other issues. (chronic knee injuries are some of the most common...).

Just sayin.

Eating disorders? I guess that anorexia has been a perennial problem of powerlifters, right?

powerlifter62
08-01-2011, 07:23 PM
I did know that. Was making a stereotypical joke.

You'd be amazed at some of the things that people have said about her, and about my wife and me with regard to her. Sorry if I seemed over-sensitive.

thecityalive
08-01-2011, 07:32 PM
Oh it's ok. I almost expected that reaction when I said that. Nevertheless...a joke. No biggie.

K-R-M
08-01-2011, 10:32 PM
Would rather see this any day (does anyone even know if she actually likes powerlifting? There's a very good chance she loves what she does, which is all that matters) then seeing kids playing video games, eating crap all day while being clinically obese/on the road to diabetes. Who is anyone to judge the parents based on 10 second videos of a sport anyways? What's the difference between this and football or gymnastics?

shocker4221
08-02-2011, 04:19 AM
I just saw this video today..... and it blew my mind.

http://youtu.be/U-IVOjLXsNc

this kid is a bad ass and my hero.... look how focussed she is before her lifts!

Her grandfather is a powerlifter too and teaches her. I saw him post up the results and is very proud.

Off Road
08-02-2011, 07:56 AM
What's the difference between this and football or gymnastics?I was thinking the same thing. My son is about the same age and has started football. It was completely his choice, I never played and certainly didn't push him into it. There is a lot of physical training involved in his practices with things like bodyweight exercises and lifts involving sandbags and pushing other kids around. Yet that isn't looked at as "bad" for them. It's all perception I guess.

Sensei
08-02-2011, 08:16 AM
If it were my daughter, I'd make sure to rectify those knees bowing in on her squats asap.

I wouldn't refer to my daughter as a "badass" but her focus, intensity and psyche were really impressive. Her world record squat was phenomenal, but if you really want to see intensity, look at her deadlifts:

http://youtu.be/rhYvtnOR7WI

It wasn't a world record, but let me tell you about her 3rd attempt. You may notice that on the second, with 185, she was losing her grip. She didn't think she had much more. I had her widen her grip out so she wasn't holding the smooth part of the bar (it was her first competition using a sumo stance). Now, an adjustment at the competition is never easy, but she went with it really well. Also, I convinced her to try 195 (she wanted 190, but I thought she could get 200). So, she got over her nervousness that she would drop it, and went out there with tremendous intensity and got it. And you can see the intensity on her face as she pulled it. So, I can see where those other than her parents could see her as a "badass".

Alex.V
08-02-2011, 08:18 AM
Eating disorders? I guess that anorexia has been a perennial problem of powerlifters, right?

Body dysmorphia, especially among young female athletes? Absolutely.

*edit* I've noticed this is your child. Please do not take comments as a personal attack. Congratulations on your daughter's accomplishments.

Just please (and I'm certain I don't need to tell you this!) be careful with her- children do respond to pressure in very different ways. I've worked with a number of former female athletes with eating disorders... and some were indeed strength athletes (throwers etc.).

As a parent, I'm sure you're taking all proper precautions, I was simply presenting my point as the counter to the immediate assumption that athletic achievements by definition boost confidence. In many cases, it is this assumption that leads to parents and caregivers missing the signs of low self-esteem.

chevelle2291
08-02-2011, 08:54 AM
I was thinking the same thing. My son is about the same age and has started football. It was completely his choice, I never played and certainly didn't push him into it. There is a lot of physical training involved in his practices with things like bodyweight exercises and lifts involving sandbags and pushing other kids around. Yet that isn't looked at as "bad" for them. It's all perception I guess.

The difference to me that I'd be worried about if I were a parent (god forbid) is the heavy loading of the spine at a young, developing age. Like I said, I have no 'proof' or studies to back up my position, but I wouldn't let my kid be doing PLing 1RMs that young. What if she blows her back out? What does that mean for future growth/development?

But, this is the PLing forum and of course this is going to be controversial. Still think it's impressive.

StormTheBeach
08-02-2011, 10:26 AM
The difference to me that I'd be worried about if I were a parent (god forbid) is the heavy loading of the spine at a young, developing age. Like I said, I have no 'proof' or studies to back up my position, but I wouldn't let my kid be doing PLing 1RMs that young. What if she blows her back out? What does that mean for future growth/development?

But, this is the PLing forum and of course this is going to be controversial. Still think it's impressive.


The rate of serious injury per 100 athletes for soccer is about 12. For weightlifting/powerlifting it's less than 1. With this in mind, I will never let my kids play soccer because it's more dangerous than lifting weights. Maybe the instance of injury is higher because they are weaker.

Alex.V
08-02-2011, 11:45 AM
. Maybe the instance of injury is higher because they are weaker.

It's because it is unpredictable. In powerlifting, there are fewer variables.. there is the bar, there is the athlete. The movements are practiced and controlled. In soccer, there is only one thing that is static- the field. The ball, the other players, and the movement of the athlete... all variable, and never the same twice.

Agreed, that powerlifting is far "safer" from an injury perspective than soccer, football, or many other more traditional sports for kids!

theBarzeen
08-02-2011, 12:53 PM
It's because it is unpredictable. In powerlifting, there are fewer variables.. there is the bar, there is the athlete. The movements are practiced and controlled. In soccer, there is only one thing that is static- the field. The ball, the other players, and the movement of the athlete... all variable, and never the same twice.

Agreed, that powerlifting is far "safer" from an injury perspective than soccer, football, or many other more traditional sports for kids!


add that to the impact forces of two kids running in to each other in football or being slammed on a mat ( or their head) in wrestling.... falls in gymnastics never mind the shoulder problems in kids who work the uneven bars or rings.....

I know a few guys with nagging injuries from lifting, yes.... but I know a LOT of guys and girls who blew out knees, shoulders, got concussions, lost teeth etc... in more traditional sports. Never mind the scores of children who sit in front of the TV or computer all day, I'd be more worried about their health. The health problems of 20 years of heavy lifting don't seem as bad as the health problems of 20 years of not doing anything.


@ PL62... I can understand that to you guys she is your 9 year old daughter, but I'd still put her poster up at my gym to motivate the team. From a powerlifter's ( and a middle school teacher's) point of view she's still a badass.

thecityalive
08-02-2011, 03:51 PM
I love how when she squats, her chest disappears into her legs.

chris mason
08-02-2011, 07:40 PM
Body dysmorphia, especially among young female athletes? Absolutely.

*edit* I've noticed this is your child. Please do not take comments as a personal attack. Congratulations on your daughter's accomplishments.

Just please (and I'm certain I don't need to tell you this!) be careful with her- children do respond to pressure in very different ways. I've worked with a number of former female athletes with eating disorders... and some were indeed strength athletes (throwers etc.).

As a parent, I'm sure you're taking all proper precautions, I was simply presenting my point as the counter to the immediate assumption that athletic achievements by definition boost confidence. In many cases, it is this assumption that leads to parents and caregivers missing the signs of low self-esteem.

The thing about kids is probably a bit skewed by gymnasts, but I think it is a valid point to consider. it is VERY, VERY rare for a child raised in a mentally healthy environment to have the necessary drive to train as one must to truly excel in a sport.

powerlifter62
08-02-2011, 08:19 PM
add that to the impact forces of two kids running in to each other in football or being slammed on a mat ( or their head) in wrestling.... falls in gymnastics never mind the shoulder problems in kids who work the uneven bars or rings.....

I know a few guys with nagging injuries from lifting, yes.... but I know a LOT of guys and girls who blew out knees, shoulders, got concussions, lost teeth etc... in more traditional sports. Never mind the scores of children who sit in front of the TV or computer all day, I'd be more worried about their health. The health problems of 20 years of heavy lifting don't seem as bad as the health problems of 20 years of not doing anything.


@ PL62... I can understand that to you guys she is your 9 year old daughter, but I'd still put her poster up at my gym to motivate the team. From a powerlifter's ( and a middle school teacher's) point of view she's still a badass.

I will say this about her; her ability to be intense, focused and motivated on the lifting platform is among her extraordinary attributes. Where many kids would get scared looking at a crowd, surrounded by judges and strange spotters, she thrives in that.

powerlifter62
08-02-2011, 08:24 PM
The thing about kids is probably a bit skewed by gymnasts, but I think it is a valid point to consider. it is VERY, VERY rare for a child raised in a mentally healthy environment to have the necessary drive to train as one must to truly excel in a sport.

That is a really broad and authoritative statement. On what do you base that, and what point are you trying to make?

mastermonster
08-02-2011, 10:00 PM
So is smoking and taking drugs etc........worse.

Agree with Nick! If she's doing this because she wants to and is enjoying it, Count it as a blessing! She could be into far worse now days! As long as she's not being pushed into it and it's kept at a training level she is having fun with, I don't see it as a negative. We have 3 - 14 Y.O.s and one of them's 10 Y.O. brother training with us. One of the 14s is my Grandson and one is our SHW's son. Before his son started training with us (he was still 12) he got his doctors input. He said as long as his technique and mechanics are sound that he didn't see any problems at any age that the kid himself is really wanting to lift. I will just say that supervision and coaching is vital. I never let our 'young lifters' just pick weights to try. I have to give an 'OK' to try any weight beyond what they've done before. You just have to keep things in check for them. I have them on 5-3-1 and it is great because the can see where their progression will take the in 3 months...6 months and even a year or more away. It keeps things structured for them.

Congrats to your daughter! That is an awesome accomplishment!

powerlifter62
08-02-2011, 10:16 PM
Her grandfather is a powerlifter too and teaches her. I saw him post up the results and is very proud.

Umm...father. That would be father! Her grandfathers do not lift, but they are both very loving and supportive of her!

shocker4221
08-03-2011, 12:16 AM
Umm...father. That would be father! Her grandfathers do not lift, but they are both very loving and supportive of her!

MY MISTAKE

chris mason
08-03-2011, 12:46 AM
That is a really broad and authoritative statement. On what do you base that, and what point are you trying to make?

I base that on my education (college degree).

The point was in part backing what Belial said and in part stating a fact that children, the VAST majority, don't have some natural desire to push themselves to the limit to compete, at least over a prolonged period (there is a difference between being competitive and pushing oneself to the limit day after day in training). Perhaps your daughter is that one in a hundred million, perhaps not.

She's your child. You will raise her as you see fit. I just hope for her sake, and yours, you are doing the right thing.

powerlifter62
08-03-2011, 05:34 AM
I base that on my education (college degree).

The point was in part backing what Belial said and in part stating a fact that children, the VAST majority, don't have some natural desire to push themselves to the limit to compete, at least over a prolonged period (there is a difference between being competitive and pushing oneself to the limit day after day in training). Perhaps your daughter is that one in a hundred million, perhaps not.

She's your child. You will raise her as you see fit. I just hope for her sake, and yours, you are doing the right thing.

One in one hundred million? Based on your college degree? Great. Have a nice day.

Alex.V
08-03-2011, 02:38 PM
No need to get offended, mate. Nobody here has any real vested interest in your kid, good or bad, and Chris isn't one to toss things out just for the sake of criticism.

You don't owe anybody here an explanation or justification, we're just all looking out and hoping that you're doing right by your daughter. Take it as a communal concern for what we see as potentially one of our own. :)

Hazerboy
08-03-2011, 05:55 PM
Not that anyone wants or needs my opinion, but I think getting a young girl involved in powerlifting is great. I fail to see how the force and stress loads are any different from any other sport that 9 year olds typically compete in -- be it soccer, basketball, gymnastics, whatever. The only difference is that in powerlifting the force is suddenly measurable, so people suddenly think its a problem. And, the sport is on the fringe, so culturally its weird to have a 9 year old (especially a girl) lift weights. Don't pay attention to these people--they're just narrow minded.

Instead, from my perspective the problem with kids and sports is over specialization. Specialization creates muscle imbalances and burns out children mentally. Case in point -- my massage therapist once told me she has as many 12 year old baseball players getting shoulder work done as she does gym rat 40 year olds.

Alex.V
08-03-2011, 06:24 PM
Don't pay attention to these people--they're just narrow minded.



What people?

ironwill727
08-03-2011, 06:31 PM
I never thought I would call a 9 year old girl a beast but that was pretty awesome. That is very impressive.

For all of you who want to debate over kids lifting weights and what not think about this... Would you rather have your kid focusing and practicing a sport or being a fat lard sitting in front of the tv, computer, video games, etc?

Kids from the age of 3 do gymnastics..which in my opinion is far more dangerous than performing a squat. I would rather live in a society where children are doing positive things aka sports then where they are being taught negative activities like selling drugs and being influenced by scum.

powerlifter62
08-03-2011, 06:32 PM
Not that anyone wants or needs my opinion, but I think getting a young girl involved in powerlifting is great. I fail to see how the force and stress loads are any different from any other sport that 9 year olds typically compete in -- be it soccer, basketball, gymnastics, whatever. The only difference is that in powerlifting the force is suddenly measurable, so people suddenly think its a problem. And, the sport is on the fringe, so culturally its weird to have a 9 year old (especially a girl) lift weights. Don't pay attention to these people--they're just narrow minded.

Instead, from my perspective the problem with kids and sports is over specialization. Specialization creates muscle imbalances and burns out children mentally. Case in point -- my massage therapist once told me she has as many 12 year old baseball players getting shoulder work done as she does gym rat 40 year olds.

My wife and I agree with you! That's why we keep her in a range of activities. For example, she spends more time in karate workouts each week than in powerlifting workouts.

chris mason
08-03-2011, 07:01 PM
I don't know you, your wife, or your child, so I have no solid opinion on your particular case. To do so would be foolish. With that said, I will call myself a skeptic on the issue. I lean towards thinking it is mentally unhealthy, but perhaps not.. If you can't handle people being skeptical of your situation I suggest you don't chase down threads online about a video you may, or may not have posted online.

chris mason
08-03-2011, 07:07 PM
Oh, and now that I watched the video, a specific concern. Why not teach her perfect technique so she can remain healthy and injury free should she decide to pursue the sport long term? She is doing a big time good morning at the bottom of those squats and that will eventually very likely lead to lower back issues. I know, I did it for years and now suffer for it.

powerlifter62
08-03-2011, 07:43 PM
Oh, and now that I watched the video, a specific concern. Why not teach her perfect technique so she can remain healthy and injury free should she decide to pursue the sport long term? She is doing a big time good morning at the bottom of those squats and that will eventually very likely lead to lower back issues. I know, I did it for years and now suffer for it.

Thank you for your concern

4g64fiero
08-03-2011, 07:58 PM
We force kids to sit through what we call schools everyday....

On the surface, I see nothing but positive things from this.

Her form, however, meh.

I also saw the threads around the net and there is alot of people using broscience to explain why she shouldnt do it. People are saying, this will just turn into an addiction and she will be on the gear by 18. Seriously, that is fear mongering and jealousy at best.

thecityalive
08-04-2011, 05:17 AM
Almost like a squat with a deadlift/ goodmorning. SPEAD THAT CHEST!

powerlifter62
08-04-2011, 05:32 AM
Almost like a squat with a deadlift/ goodmorning. SPEAD THAT CHEST!

No, it really isn't. She could have been more upright, particularly on the 205, but let's keep in mind that was an all-time record amount, so form is likely to degrade some. Let's also keep in mind that in powerlifting, the bar is a bit further down the back, so you are a somewhat further forward than would be typical in bodybuilding. It really is her legs that are off-the-charts strong. Her back is quite strong too (see her 195 deadlift), but her leg strength is most impressive. As to her form, I am always working with her to improve her form, and continue to do so.

I have done many good mornings in my time. She was not doing good mornings.

thecityalive
08-04-2011, 05:51 AM
I know that powerlifters have the bar down the back for leverage, it's simple science, but there is a difference between good powerlifting form and incorrect form. She has the latter.


On good mornings: Perhaps not the glute or hamstring part of it, but the way she lifted that weight with her back sure looked like one.

SEOINAGE
08-04-2011, 09:22 AM
I think it is great. My daughter is 7 months old, and a few months ago I made her a pull up bar out of pvc pipe, she would hold the bar in her mouth and hold herself up in that position. plus she can hold out in push up position and support her weight in a handstand, I help her balance. Timed her for static hangs on my gymnastic rings and she did 35 seconds before slipping. Plus she is tiny so it is crazy she can even grip anything, she was born 5 weeks early, strong as can be though.

I don't think there is anything wrong with strength training at a young age, I plan on teaching my kids all they want to know. But I plan on using bodyweight for as long as possible, and that is really until they are begging to use the barbell, but I am all for encouraging them to play and do things active outside, already have a trampoline and the park is close by. But till she is older even when training it will be more like playing and trying to push your limits on trying to do tough things.

theBarzeen
08-04-2011, 02:15 PM
I know that powerlifters have the bar down the back for leverage, it's simple science, but there is a difference between good powerlifting form and incorrect form. She has the latter.


On good mornings: Perhaps not the glute or hamstring part of it, but the way she lifted that weight with her back sure looked like one.

I have to respectfully disagree with this.
The big warning signs that something is wrong (like a rounded out back) weren't there..... that and this form obviously works for her. I'm sure that my form with a raw squat thats more than twice my body weight is no better. I'd be willing to bet that most guys on here are about the same...

chris mason
08-04-2011, 10:13 PM
I have to respectfully disagree with this.
The big warning signs that something is wrong (like a rounded out back) weren't there..... that and this form obviously works for her. I'm sure that my form with a raw squat thats more than twice my body weight is no better. I'd be willing to bet that most guys on here are about the same...

She is very young. She is putting tremendous stress on her lower back with that form. The chance of injury is high whether acute or over time.