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synonymous
09-10-2011, 08:08 AM
I wrote a long post, decided to shorten it up. (But now I see it's not)

I seem to have hypoglycemia issues on certain days (During stress intensive events). Before each event I down a serving of Nitrean+ (These days are my off days from the gym, Sat and Sun). Throughout the day I switch between Nitrean+ (Maybe 3-5 servings over the course of the day) and a massive lunch/dinner I prepack which is usually wild rice, avocado, onion, cottage cheese, chicken (Or beef or fish) and a green salad with olive oil (3000 calories, with another 600 left for a bigger breakfast or a bigger dinner). So I switch from Nitrean+ to real food to Nitrean+ over the course of the day.

Today, I missed my last serving of Nitrean+(No water, not time to get water). However I had just taken a serving 1 hour before. I thought I'd still have some in my stomach. I could have had real food, but I was on my last 2 hours and wanted to eat the real food on my way home (To enjoy it). Unfortunately, during the course of the event, I could almost feel my body reaching into my stomach and when it found nothing I had the symptoms of hypoglycemia. They aren't as severe as they were a few months back but still not fun.

As soon as I finished, I had the last of my lunch/dinner with my Nitrean+ serving (Had a friend get some water while I was finishing business) and was feeling great, good to go.

So...am I burning through my proteins (Or am I not understanding the process) too fast. Can I add something to it to slow the process?

I'm having a lot of trouble finding information online about hypoglycemia and none of my doctors seem to think it's an issue. One doctor said "Have a big piece of chocolate in the morning filled with calories and that should get you through the morning." Great advice :(

Off Road
09-10-2011, 08:57 AM
I have to go along with your doctor...eat some food!

Behemoth
09-10-2011, 10:11 AM
I wrote a long post, decided to shorten it up. (But now I see it's not)

I seem to have hypoglycemia issues on certain days (During stress intensive events). Before each event I down a serving of Nitrean+ (These days are my off days from the gym, Sat and Sun). Throughout the day I switch between Nitrean+ (Maybe 3-5 servings over the course of the day) and a massive lunch/dinner I prepack which is usually wild rice, avocado, onion, cottage cheese, chicken (Or beef or fish) and a green salad with olive oil (3000 calories, with another 600 left for a bigger breakfast or a bigger dinner). So I switch from Nitrean+ to real food to Nitrean+ over the course of the day.

Today, I missed my last serving of Nitrean+(No water, not time to get water). However I had just taken a serving 1 hour before. I thought I'd still have some in my stomach. I could have had real food, but I was on my last 2 hours and wanted to eat the real food on my way home (To enjoy it). Unfortunately, during the course of the event, I could almost feel my body reaching into my stomach and when it found nothing I had the symptoms of hypoglycemia. They aren't as severe as they were a few months back but still not fun.

As soon as I finished, I had the last of my lunch/dinner with my Nitrean+ serving (Had a friend get some water while I was finishing business) and was feeling great, good to go.

So...am I burning through my proteins (Or am I not understanding the process) too fast. Can I add something to it to slow the process?

I'm having a lot of trouble finding information online about hypoglycemia and none of my doctors seem to think it's an issue. One doctor said "Have a big piece of chocolate in the morning filled with calories and that should get you through the morning." Great advice :(

Hyopglycemia sucks. Does it happen after everytime you have a meal that is just a shake? If so certainly alter that meal, adding most anything to it will likely help. If it is just a occasional freak occurrence I wouldn't worry much about it, keep a roll of glucose tabs or some candy made of dextrose around.

I think in the first month when I was switching to an intermittent fasting style of eating I had about 4 or 5 mornings with hypoglycemic episodes. Obviously I broke my morning fast and ate something but it's been a long time now since I've had an episode.

If your cases are infrequent you may be fine just treated the episodes as they occasionally arise and they may dissipate. If it's pretty regular and predictable when it's going to happen you certainly want to alter you meal content and/or timing.

K-R-M
09-10-2011, 02:34 PM
Do you have hypoglycemia or did you diagnose yourself with hypoglycemia?

thecityalive
09-10-2011, 02:57 PM
Do you have hypoglycemia or did you diagnose yourself with hypoglycemia?
Good point. Get a professional to evaluate this. Web M.D. is about as useful as a broken condom.

Mark!
09-10-2011, 04:40 PM
I'm having a lot of trouble finding information online about hypoglycemia and none of my doctors seem to think it's an issue. One doctor said "Have a big piece of chocolate in the morning filled with calories and that should get you through the morning." Great advice :(

Read guys...

alexspt
09-10-2011, 07:36 PM
I have had symptoms of hypoglycemia too so I feel ya. Not fun. I usually will just try to get enough carbs with protein. Hypoglycemic events are caused by abnormalities in a hormone called "insulin" which basically pulls glucose from the blood to the muscles. So yours is "over efficient" and taking too much sugar out of your blood causing that weak/hungry/dizzy/not fun feeling. I eat every 2-3 hours with 1 serving protein and 2 servings carbs and that seems to work great. (P.s. put your hand in a fist. That = 1 serving)

synonymous
09-10-2011, 08:06 PM
From Mon-Fri I eat real food with protein between meals. Less so with those 2 days a week due to an irregular work hours. Protein is just a supplement for when I can't get in anything between meals (real food). I do eat real food on Sat-Sun out of my big lunch/dinner box (3000 calories spread over 10 hours + Nitrean+)

One doctor said I had a hypoglycemic attack (No heart problems, no brain issues, no bad blood work: All been tested). He's the only one to acknowledge that my symptoms are hypoglycemic attacks induced by stress. The problem is, the stressful events occur at a time when I can't eat or drink anything which is why I eat/drink before each session.

The problem with the other doctors advice with eating chocolate is that from what I understand you burn through that sugar fast which is why you should eat protein and fat. Eating chocolate (Which was serious advice on his part) made no sense to me as far as my understanding of hypoglycemia and preventing attacks. Which is why I have a high protein fat meal.

I also have bags of different kinds of nuts. I've found mixed reviews on using nuts to balance out your calories with hypoglycemia, some saying it's good others saying it's bad (Something to do with carbs to protein ratio and how peanuts are not actual nuts). The same with milk, some swearing it's evil and others saying that the sugars in milk digest slowly compared to others. This is stuff I've brought up with my doctor(s) and their reactions have been 'You seem to know more than I do, see what works and take it from there.' (I don't live in the U.S, I'm in Asia) If I ask for their professional opinion I get an 'Err...uhm...well...' kind of reaction. Asking about getting a definite diagnosis on hypoglycemia they say that there are no real conclusive tests that can be done...apparently.

I've been tested for diabetes and I'm not diabetic. I'm at the gym Mon-Wed-Fri and doing well during the week. The stress that comes with my work on Sat-Sun is what is causing (As far as I can tell...and agreed on by one doctor) my attacks. Unfortunately, my Sat-Sun work is the bread and butter of my family's income.

Since adapting my diet Sat-Sun to have something to eat before each event, I am able to work without issue (For the last 3 months). But if I miss or skip one small meal or drink, I'm feeling sick. Since doing this (3 months) I've been fine. I thought I would be fine yesterday (First time missing a meal) and I wasn't so I wondered about the digesting of the proteins in Nitrean+.

Mon-Fri I don't have the same amount of stress (With the exception of whatever stress I'm putting on myself at the gym). If I miss a meal or wait an hour or two (For whatever good reason I might have) I don't get hypoglycemic attacks during the week.

So, would it be best to simply pack a snack/lunch/snack/dinner 'all real food meal' and eat that over the course of the day without incorporating Nitrean+ (I'm going to have to reduce carbs and fat to add more protein to keep the same calories....tweaking will be needed, but I'm sure I can figure something out) for my weekend work?

I don't want to get into the kind of work I do, but it's important work with very strict rules and regulations that keep me from having enough time to sit and enjoy my meals. Bringing up hypoglycemia as an issue will result in loss of work. I'd rather attack the hypoglycemia.

K-R-M
09-11-2011, 12:19 PM
I checked my literature and didn't find anything worth mentioning. But eating small frequent meals seems to be the standard cure for people with reactive hypoglycemia. When you say that some people are against carbs/milk, who are those people? I don't think there's any merit at all to what they're saying, considering relief is generally provided by administration of glucose. Go with what works for you. Stress induced hypoglycemia definitely makes sense on a number of levels. But if you have an episode of hypoglycemia, maybe you can check your serum glucose levels (clinically speaking, they should be below 2.5mmol/L or 45mg/dL) and if administration of glucose+normal glucose levels provide relief of your hypoglycemia symptoms. If it's not the case, I would look at a psychogenic cause...

I did a search around for good articles and there's a wealth for diabetes related hypoglycemia, but this one seemed interesting: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21894674. I'll go check out our medical library, but our employees are on strike right now lol.

K-R-M
09-11-2011, 06:22 PM
Try to bring this to the attention of your doctors:


"Convincing documentation of hypoglycemia requires the fulfillment of Whipple's triad. Thus, the ideal time to measure the plasma glucose level is during a symptomatic episode. A normal glucose level excludes hypoglycemia as the cause of the symptoms. A low glucose level confirms that hypoglycemia is the cause of the symptoms, provided the latter resolve after the glucose level is raised. When the cause of the hypoglycemic episode is obscure, additional measurements, while the glucose level is low and before treatment, should include plasma insulin, C-peptide, proinsulin and -hydroxybutyrate levels, as well as screening for circulating oral hypoglycemic agents, and symptoms should be assessed during and after the plasma glucose concentration is raised."

Here are some references for you to check out:
et al: Evaluation and management of adult hypoglycemic disorders: An Endocrine Society clinical practice guideline. J Clin Endocrinol Metab 94:709, 2009


: Hypoglycemia, in Williams Textbook of Endocrinology, 12th ed, S Melmed et al (eds). Philadelphia, Saunders, in press

This should help you and your doctor find a solution to your problem.

synonymous
09-11-2011, 07:29 PM
Thank you.

I certainly will bring it up with my doctor but I have a strong feeling it will get brushed aside.

The people making claims about the good/bad foods/habits on hypoglycemia are on a ehealthforum.com forum dedicated to hypoglycemia. The moderator of the forum has a list of do's and don'ts. Scanning the online resources I can understand, it's all different from site to site.

Right now the frequent meals is what's keeping me from feeling sick. I'm pretty sure it's not psychogenic. I was prescribed a beta-blocker once to deal with possible 'performance anxiety'. I've never had issues with doing what I do in front of a large crowd. The first time I took it (And ate properly) I was just feeling 'good'. The second time (This time skipping a meal) I felt mentally fine but noticed that the physical symptoms were still present (Although much easier to get through since I didn't have the rush of adrenalin (Apparently beta-blockers and hypoglycemia can be a bad combination as it masks the mental fight or flight symptoms).