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kingns
10-26-2011, 04:53 PM
I just finished training for a meet where I wore my gear for a long time leading up to it. I feel like I loose a lot of raw strength leading up to a meet. What do you guys do to keep all your raw strength when your in your gear all the time?

If I had better technique and knew my bench shirt really good I wouldnt feel the need to wear it all the time, but as the meet comes close I figure i wont get stronger, but can get better technique atleast. But am looking for a better compromise

CrazyEyesPat
10-26-2011, 06:25 PM
Well--- to be frank you really don't (at least everyone I know) -- after a meet I come out of my gear for 4-6 weeks and my raw strength is back 100% or better than previously. For the squat it's really just re-learning the movement (not sitting back as far, feet in a bit closer, and increasing reversal strength)

ScottYard
10-26-2011, 06:54 PM
You won't excell at both. Pick what you want and focus on that.

Travis Bell
10-26-2011, 07:56 PM
I've been able to progress in both the shirt and raw by working in my shirt every 3-4 weeks and working raw the rest of the time.

For me, getting stronger raw makes hitting PRs in the shirt much easier and steady.

Just like people need to change their ME exercise every week to help keep progressing, I think it works that same way with the shirt more often than not. If you're doing the same thing week in and week out, nailing PRs is going to be quite difficult.

kingns
10-26-2011, 09:55 PM
I think that if i get stronger raw then when I put my gear, my numbers are up in the gear too and it usually works that way. But I am a pretty Sh**y geared lifter and need to get better at it so I find myself in it more than I would like. And i feel a hell of a lot stronger after 12 weeks of raw lifting, than 12 weeks of geared lifting, even though the numbers are lower.
Just trying to get some ideas.

ScottYard
10-27-2011, 09:07 AM
I've been able to progress in both the shirt and raw by working in my shirt every 3-4 weeks and working raw the rest of the time.

For me, getting stronger raw makes hitting PRs in the shirt much easier and steady.

Just like people need to change their ME exercise every week to help keep progressing, I think it works that same way with the shirt more often than not. If you're doing the same thing week in and week out, nailing PRs is going to be quite difficult.

With your raw bench I think you have the potential to be more closer to a 900 shirted bench then a 800 like you are now. I think by you focusing on both its slightly holding you back.

Just my 2 cents.

Travis Bell
10-27-2011, 09:39 AM
With your raw bench I think you have the potential to be more closer to a 900 shirted bench then a 800 like you are now. I think by you focusing on both its slightly holding you back.

Just my 2 cents.

I have a meet coming up in December. If things keep going like they have been in training I'll close that gap greatly.

I have done the whole get in your shirt every week thing and I got slower, more beat up and everything eventually felt very heavy.

Travis Bell
10-27-2011, 09:40 AM
Vincent is another solid example. He's not in his shirt every week either.

Dave Hoff, AJ Roberts - both 900+ benchers do the same as well.

BloodandThunder
10-27-2011, 10:43 AM
Depends on what gear you use, your style of lifting, etc.

A person who squats with a very wide stance who's been very lift specific with box squats and wide stances will have problems with a closer unequipped stance. Once training is shifted though, that'll change.

Alot of this has to do with reversal strength as well.

mastermonster
10-27-2011, 11:38 AM
At about 2004-5 I started training almost every bench and squat day in my equipment on the advice of Tony Caprari even though he was about 23 years younger than me. He said if you want to master it, you need to live in it! This was after a lot of years of training. What happened within 2 years was my shirted bench went up over 250 pounds (multi), almost 200 pounds (single) and my geared squat went up over 200 pounds. Now the unplanned benefit of all of this 'overload' training was that my raw bench passed my previous shirted bench; and my raw squat passed my previous geared squat by about 50 pounds. Part of this is because my raw and shirted lift technique is exactly the same, so their's virtually no 're-learning' to deal with when I go back and forth from raw to equipped meet. Over the last few years I've been ranked at the top of the over 50 rankings in raw and single ply and at the top or highly in the multi-ply rankings (the bench only and deadlift only guys usually keep me out of the top in Multi). Training like this has been the best thing I ever did to help my raw #s as a competitor.

theBarzeen
10-27-2011, 05:37 PM
Lift in gear as often as you need to in order to be proficient with it.

I squat in briefs every week, and get in the suit every third, or every other week. More recently because I am working on breaking in my new suit.

I bench in a shirt every other or 2 out of every three weeks, so raw, shirt, shirt, repeat.

I work in the suit every 3 or 4 weeks because there is a lot less to learn about a suit for a conventional deadlifter, especially with band training to overload on the top end.

I got in full gear every week for a few years straight, but as the weights started to get heavier I had to back off more. I do think that I need to get in to my squat suit more often though as I should be squatting way more in it, considering how much I'm doing in briefs and reverse band in briefs.

just my $0.02...... I do a raw day every other week, but never that heavy. On my heavy days I'll warm up with the bar, put on briefs and then go right to two plates.