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Murderous
11-27-2011, 03:55 AM
I read T-nation's article about peaking for a meet, as well as two others. Why is it that you must lower your volume and increase your intensity when it comes to getting ready for a competition. Can't you just take three days off before the meet and do your three attempts based on your current 1RM's for the big three? Thanks.

ScottYard
11-27-2011, 06:32 AM
You can do this . But do a few meets then realize why for most it doesnt workout.

Tom Mutaffis
11-27-2011, 08:39 AM
I read T-nation's article about peaking for a meet, as well as two others. Why is it that you must lower your volume and increase your intensity when it comes to getting ready for a competition. Can't you just take three days off before the meet and do your three attempts based on your current 1RM's for the big three? Thanks.

In most sports it is best to train in a similar manner to how you compete, so if a powerlifting competition is low volume and high intensity then it makes sense to prepare by simulating that in your training.

For someone who is just looking to test out their 1RM's then you could simply take a couple of days off and then go for it.

Murderous
11-27-2011, 02:27 PM
You can do this . But do a few meets then realize why for most it doesnt workout.So you mean the body isn't in top shape to push out its best power output unless you take the time to peak for a meet is how I understand it, correct?

theBarzeen
11-27-2011, 03:36 PM
The standard protocol is hitting your planned openers either a week or two out from your meet then deloading so that you come in fresh..... You can see TONS of guys who put up huge numbers in the gym but never deliver at a meet because they aren't conditioned for it, or just missed their peak.

vdizenzo
11-27-2011, 08:14 PM
I think the more novice the lifter the less he or she has to worry about this. Try just training the way you do, then simply deload the last week before a meet. Yes, there is a lot of science out there about meet prep, however, we are all different. Learn what works for you through trial and error. Lift, have fun, and learn.

Murderous
11-27-2011, 08:45 PM
Thank you, I am a novice lifter but I am still learning (have learned a lot so far)... I won't be competing any time soon due to injury, but I was thinking I could a bench only meet and my current 235 lb bench @ 183-186 is good enough for a state record as a 15 yo. might wait until I could break a national teen bench record. I could add 10-15 lbs a month to my bench so this is why I thought that for someone like me not attempting any PR's or heavy training for 6-8 weeks until before the competition isn't necessary when preparing for a meet. Thanks a lot.

SELK
11-27-2011, 08:50 PM
Im of the opinion that if your gym lifts are higher then your meet lifts, there is some sort of problem with your training cycle leading up to the meet.

nobody ever said no PRs or heavy training 6-8 weeks before the meet. I would say 4-8 weeks out from a meet is when your training should actually be the heaviest.

I do something like:

Last day of heavy squat (circa max) - 2.5 weeks before meet
Last heavy bench day - 10 days from meet
Last heavy pull - In the past I have pulled my opener at 4 weeks out with good success.

chris mason
11-27-2011, 09:11 PM
My guess is that article is trying to address delayed transformation. The idea being essentially you overreach with your training and then back off as the meet approaches to allow for potential supercompensation.

ThomasG
11-27-2011, 09:31 PM
My guess is that article is trying to address delayed transformation. The idea being essentially you overreach with your training and then back off as the meet approaches to allow for potential supercompensation.

If I'm understanding you correctly that's what happened to me my last meet. Felt like shit 9 days out, everything was heavy. Completely rested for 9 days then went 9 for 9, PRed every lift with more in the tank on every lift. I've heard some people say if you feel like crap a week or two out then you're ready.

Murderous
11-28-2011, 12:26 AM
Thank you now I fully understand. Will be fun to try out before first competition.

JSully
11-28-2011, 11:32 AM
If I'm understanding you correctly that's what happened to me my last meet. Felt like shit 9 days out, everything was heavy. Completely rested for 9 days then went 9 for 9, PRed every lift with more in the tank on every lift. I've heard some people say if you feel like crap a week or two out then you're ready.

yep, this has happened to me in training too. I've felt like utter crap one week, deloaded, then that first week back was hitting PRs.

BloodandThunder
11-28-2011, 12:10 PM
Plain and simple, peaking is installed in order to accompany making weight and displaying strength. Two things that are not detailed in a training plan. Meet day is about hitting numbers, not getting stronger, and doing so, within the guidelines of a certain bodyweight. If you even look at the Bulgarian system where they had bi-weekly even weekly competitions in practice, they still tapered to a degree and made weight for their Olympic cycle. Even a few weeks out, when you're beat down, it's because you're still training to get stronger and that requires a certain level of intensity and volume. You may also be hitting weights but not in competition form since you're so banged up.

Dank27
11-28-2011, 04:33 PM
The standard protocol is hitting your planned openers either a week or two out from your meet then deloading so that you come in fresh..... You can see TONS of guys who put up huge numbers in the gym but never deliver at a meet because they aren't conditioned for it, or just missed their peak.

This has been the issue that I really struggle to get past. My training 6 weeks out from a meet will be spot on. Then when I get <10 days out I seem to psych myself out. Either that or my nerves get the best of me on meet day (i have only competed 5x so I am still an amatuer by every sense of the word)

theBarzeen
11-28-2011, 05:43 PM
This has been the issue that I really struggle to get past. My training 6 weeks out from a meet will be spot on. Then when I get <10 days out I seem to psych myself out. Either that or my nerves get the best of me on meet day (i have only competed 5x so I am still an amatuer by every sense of the word)

Part of it can definitely be nerves. That can take a lot out of you, but you learn to harness that as you gain experience.
It can also be a poorly planned training cycle, especially the last few weeks before the meet. It's easy to burn out by pushing too hard before a meet. The hardest thing to do, especially when you are feeling good, is to back off. That IS what you need to do before a meet though if you want to be at your best. Swallow your pride the last week and do some very light work, relax, stretch, and chill out. By that point you are as strong as you are going to get, it's all about not messing up what you've already done.

Murderous
11-29-2011, 04:10 AM
Started reading Supertraining, will keep that in mind to back off the weight two weeks before my first competition, thanks again guys.