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barryisawinnah
12-28-2011, 06:14 PM
New gym has a reverse hyper, it's sweet. It is one with the straps, what are the primary differences between the short and long strap? Also any advice on how to program them is definitely encouraged.

I train there 3 days a week (Deads, Squat and Bench, I do my overhead training in the garage)

Thanks
Bryan

NickAus
12-28-2011, 07:12 PM
I would do them for higher reps on deads day, lower on squat day.

Just my 2 cents.

Good luck, they should pay off!

RFabsik
12-28-2011, 08:19 PM
Short strap hits the low back more. Low strap hits hips and hammies more. Roller is closer to the short strap in training effect.

Christianiron
01-03-2012, 12:42 PM
I just rigged a DIY Rev Hyper cage add-on super cheap...
Check it out;
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgTE8tZy4ks&list=UUOZ-NH7nUogwTdjRTh088UQ&index=1&feature=plcp

powerlifter62
01-03-2012, 05:22 PM
I would do them for higher reps on deads day, lower on squat day.

Just my 2 cents.

Good luck, they should pay off!

Totally agree, and I've gotten great benefit from it. I was about to start going to a chiropracter, when I found a reverse hyper in a local gym. Very quickly, I found that I had no need for the chiropracter anymore. I use it exactly that way, heavier on deadlift days, a bit lighter on squat days.

ThomasG
01-03-2012, 05:24 PM
I've been using it about 7x/week 5days a week. Lower back has been feeling better.

RhodeHouse
01-03-2012, 05:45 PM
I would do the movement very controlled. I know you can let it swing and use momentu,m, which is fine if you don't have a back injury, in my opinion. If you do, like me, doing them very light, slow and controlled is the only way I can keep from aggravating my back.

Don't go nuts with them, either. They are pretty good, but they're not the holy grail. Keep working them.

To everyone else, anyone have any herniations at L4 and L5 and have success with the RH? I always seem to aggravate my sciatic pain no matter how light (25lbs) or slow I do them on the down phase.

barryisawinnah
01-03-2012, 06:31 PM
I have been letting it swing it pretty rapidly on the higher rep day, and about 20 minutes after doing them (on the drive home, lol) the lower back pump is bad (guess that is a good thing) makes driving suck though, lol

Travis Bell
01-03-2012, 06:52 PM
I would do the movement very controlled. I know you can let it swing and use momentu,m, which is fine if you don't have a back injury, in my opinion. If you do, like me, doing them very light, slow and controlled is the only way I can keep from aggravating my back.

Don't go nuts with them, either. They are pretty good, but they're not the holy grail. Keep working them.

To everyone else, anyone have any herniations at L4 and L5 and have success with the RH? I always seem to aggravate my sciatic pain no matter how light (25lbs) or slow I do them on the down phase.

I've had 4 high school athletes come to my gym seeking L4 and 5 herniations. Two of them were very severe and we've completely rehabbed them to where they have no pain.

Prior to coming in they could hardly squat and deadlifting was completely out of the question. All of them pull over 400 now.

Matt for you the key might be flexibility? Also I don't make the kids bring the weight down excessively slow. Part of the point of the reverse hyper is to decompress the vertebrae when the momentum pulls your feet forwards and flexes your back around the edge of the pad.

I've had another client who is in his mid 40s who had struggled with severe herniation to the point of not being able to do his job as an electrician. He's had I think two surgeries? He fractured some of his vertebrae in high school playing football and just ignored it for a very long time. Difference with him is the pain will always be there to some extent, but if he comes into the gym at least once a week he can easily keep it down to a slight stiffness in his lower back as opposed to the electrical shock going down his back into his leg.

Reverse hyper is awesome, but if it's done wrong it's just as worthless as anything else.

April Mathis
01-03-2012, 07:37 PM
I would do the movement very controlled. I know you can let it swing and use momentu,m, which is fine if you don't have a back injury, in my opinion. If you do, like me, doing them very light, slow and controlled is the only way I can keep from aggravating my back.

Don't go nuts with them, either. They are pretty good, but they're not the holy grail. Keep working them.

To everyone else, anyone have any herniations at L4 and L5 and have success with the RH? I always seem to aggravate my sciatic pain no matter how light (25lbs) or slow I do them on the down phase.

I have had a couple bad back injuries and get sciatic nerve pain down my left side a lot. It has been better the last year. The few times I tried reverse hypers though in the past thinking it might help, only aggravated it worse every time. So the best thing I think is not to do them. From what I've heard from other people is it helps rehab some back injuries but aggravates others. It makes a lot more sense to me just to do something else that doesn't aggravate it as much. I mean it is just a minor assistance lift, not a squat or deadlift that you can't avoid training. Glute-ham raises have always been ok for me or just regular back extensions even as alternatives.

blong
01-03-2012, 07:40 PM
I just rigged a DIY Rev Hyper cage add-on super cheap...
Check it out;
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UgTE8tZy4ks&list=UUOZ-NH7nUogwTdjRTh088UQ&index=1&feature=plcp

Did a similar attachment myself and it feels really close to the Westside model I use frequently at a public gym. Main difference being I can't go as heavy on the DIY model. Sometimes I just do a partial movement at the top only contracting the glutes if I can't go heavy. But like others already stated I think this is a great tool to use on recovery days and extra workouts for higher reps. Plus I have heard from various sources that Dave Hoff swears by the movement.....enough said.

April Mathis
01-03-2012, 07:45 PM
New gym has a reverse hyper, it's sweet. It is one with the straps, what are the primary differences between the short and long strap? Also any advice on how to program them is definitely encouraged.

I train there 3 days a week (Deads, Squat and Bench, I do my overhead training in the garage)

Thanks
Bryan

When you squat or deadlift or both makes the most sense. A few sets of higher reps is enough. It is just an assistance lift. Treat it like any other. I always though the difference between the straps to be related to height. If you're shorter use the longer strap (because you won't be able to reach the other one) and if you're taller the shorter one or either I guess.

RhodeHouse
01-03-2012, 08:29 PM
I've had 4 high school athletes come to my gym seeking L4 and 5 herniations. Two of them were very severe and we've completely rehabbed them to where they have no pain.

Prior to coming in they could hardly squat and deadlifting was completely out of the question. All of them pull over 400 now.

Matt for you the key might be flexibility? Also I don't make the kids bring the weight down excessively slow. Part of the point of the reverse hyper is to decompress the vertebrae when the momentum pulls your feet forwards and flexes your back around the edge of the pad.

I've had another client who is in his mid 40s who had struggled with severe herniation to the point of not being able to do his job as an electrician. He's had I think two surgeries? He fractured some of his vertebrae in high school playing football and just ignored it for a very long time. Difference with him is the pain will always be there to some extent, but if he comes into the gym at least once a week he can easily keep it down to a slight stiffness in his lower back as opposed to the electrical shock going down his back into his leg.

Reverse hyper is awesome, but if it's done wrong it's just as worthless as anything else.

Travis, I'm tight for sure. I'm really working on my back and hamstring flexibility. Some of it is just my hip and the range of motion isn't going to improve because of the arthritis. But, I know I can improve what I have to work with.

My issue with letting it swing, which is what I used to do, is that it pulls on my back and causes a lot of discomfort followed by sciatic pain. The issue is my disc is herniated out from my spine, not to the side. So the rounding of the back at the bottom, which usually feels great, seems to exascerbate my pain.

Just tryng to explore some other avenues for rehab.
\
April, thanks for the reply. That's what I seem to have with it. I just want something to work!

Travis Bell
01-04-2012, 02:50 AM
That makes sense. If your muscles are that tight, the reverse hyper pulling on them is going to be difficult as well as not allow the vertebrae decompress.

Sometimes its a nerve flexibility thing as well. Sometimes the reason for the hip and hamstring flexibility is muscular weakness somewhere else.

Hopefully it'll get to a more manageable state. That kinda pain can be super aggravating.