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View Full Version : Yet another reason to consider fish oil...



chris mason
01-26-2012, 08:40 AM
http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/01/13/omega-3s-vital-for-sperm-health/

Yes, we sell fish oil at www.atlargenutrition.com :redface:.

mike mcgee
01-26-2012, 11:20 AM
I didn't think I needed another reason, but thanks for the info Chris.

r2473
01-26-2012, 11:36 AM
I read about all the benefits of Omega-3 / fish oil, but I don't have any of the problems Omega-3 supplementation is meant to address.

http://www.umm.edu/altmed/articles/omega-3-000316.htm

1) Reduce Inflammation - I don't suffer from inflammation

2) Blood pressure, cholesterol, heart disease, diabetes - I get annual blood tests (for insurance). I'm in VERY healthy zones for all of these.

3) Cancer prevention - Maybe. Everyone is at risk for cancer I suppose. But I think eating more fruits and vegetables provides better protection (and is better for you).

4) Cognitive enhancement - I just don't really buy this. I'd rather just "exercise" my brain by reading quality books regularly, etc. No magic pills for me thanks.

5) Fertility - I not really worried about my sperm count.

My point is, people just seem to "knee jerk" assume that fish oil and a multi vitamin will "help them", but I wonder if these people have simply been checked out to see if they lack anything these supplements are meant to provide.

Further, I think people take things like this out of laziness. Instead, address your diet and your lifestyle first. Get those 100% in line. Then if you still need something, maybe supplements could be an option.

Well, whatever......

K-R-M
01-26-2012, 04:36 PM
Unless you're eating fish every day, you can't address this. It's tough to argue the benefits in this case, much like creatine.

NITF
01-26-2012, 07:01 PM
...
Further, I think people take things like this out of laziness. Instead, address your diet and your lifestyle first. Get those 100% in line. Then if you still need something, maybe supplements could be an option.

Well, whatever......

I see your overall point about not using supplements as a substitute for a proper diet... but fish oil is probably the wrong target for your hang-up, just because it actually IS a really great supplement for everyone to take. And not to make it sound like some kind of miracle drug, but the things you listed as benefits are just the some of the reasons to take it. It even has been demonstrated to help with recovery, so maybe that falls under something you're not immune to like everything else.

r2473
01-27-2012, 12:15 PM
I see your overall point about not using supplements as a substitute for a proper diet... but fish oil is probably the wrong target for your hang-up, just because it actually IS a really great supplement for everyone to take. And not to make it sound like some kind of miracle drug, but the things you listed as benefits are just the some of the reasons to take it. It even has been demonstrated to help with recovery, so maybe that falls under something you're not immune to like everything else.

http://www.naturalproductsinsider.com/news/2010/08/fish-oil-supports-muscle-recovery.aspx

Sure, the benefits are endless.

Maybe the better question to ask (yourself) is "specifically, why do I take (should I take) X".

This is a question I want answered before I take anything. I asked myself this question when it comes to fish oil, did a bit of research, paid attention to my general health test results and decided I don't need to take it. It won't really be helpful.

You'll have to decide for yourself which supplements you think may be helpful for you. But I think asking the question is important.

Personally, I don't think supplements are needed by most people. Just my personal opinion. Everyone has to decide for themselves.

r2473
01-27-2012, 12:19 PM
Unless you're eating fish every day, you can't address this. It's tough to argue the benefits in this case, much like creatine.

OK. I'll test your knowledge.

1) How much "fish oil" do you "need"?

2) What benefits can YOU EXPECT by taking the amount you come up with in (1) above?

3) What are the risks to YOU if you do not take the amount you come up with in (1)?

K-R-M
01-27-2012, 02:32 PM
OK. I'll test your knowledge.

1) How much "fish oil" do you "need"?

4g does the trick, though 250 to 500mg of EPA+DHA is enough for the benefits. Eating 1 or 2 (preferably 2) servings of oily fish is fine, if not better.



2) What benefits can YOU EXPECT by taking the amount you come up with in (1) above?
-At typical dietary intakes, antiarrhythmic effets predominate, with reduced risks of sudden cardiac deaths and coronary heart disease death (significant).
-Significantly lower blood lipids (3-4gs/day)
-Lower systolic blood pressure
-Lower resting heart rate
-Reduced inflammation mediators
-Modest reduction of chronic progression of atherosclerosis

These are some pretty decent side effects for something as easy as eating salmon twice a week.

There's also some potential neurological/cognitive benefits. But obviously, aside from some pretty significant reduced cardiovascular disease risks, most benefits are modest -> which is normal as its just food.




3) What are the risks to YOU if you do not take the amount you come up with in (1)?
Strange question. This is like say, oatmeal, where consumption has been linked with decreased risk. So an increased risk of all of the above. It's not medication, it's a dietary recommendation. Obviously, you really don't have to take it. Your blood tests and health are fine, so don't take fish oil if you don't want to. But I would definitely recommend it to people suffering from familial CV health problems/hypertension/hypercholesterolemia who have an increased risk of cardiovascular mortality and morbidity. Same thing with exercise and overall diet.

r2473
01-27-2012, 04:13 PM
Its more of the thought process that I was getting at. Understanding what a product can and cannot do. How it pertains at an individual specific level. Understanding how one product (fish oil) relates to your diet (and exercise) choices and how, taken as a whole, it could have certain effects.

So if you have high blood pressure, high cholesterol, have already had a heart attack, etc, then a fish oil supplement (along with a good diet and regular exercise) could be beneficial.

But for most people, popping fish oil capsulse probably doesn't really do much.

chris mason
01-27-2012, 08:32 PM
Everyone has inflammation on a continuous basis. Just an FYI.

r2473
01-28-2012, 08:59 AM
Everyone has inflammation on a continuous basis. Just an FYI.

Let's grant this for the sake of argument.

If true, what does the addition of "adequate" fish oil (by supplementation or otherwise) do for the type of inflammation we are talking about here? Try to be specific in your response.

It is also well known that inflammation is part of the normal healing process inflammation, proliferation, and repair), so (when) is it a good idea to take something (NSAID) to interfere with the bodies normal processes?

As you respond (if you respond), keep in mind that the overarching question is always about the cost / benefit to fish oil supplementation (in other words, lets not get so bogged down in small details about inflammation and lose sight of the larger issues here).

I exercise on a near daily basis (cardio and/or resistance) and do not notice any inflammation problems I feel I need to address. I'm nearly 40 years old too.

JacobH
01-28-2012, 03:19 PM
But for most people, popping fish oil capsulse probably doesn't really do much.

Yes it does. By taking fish oil, you are at a reduced risk for all of the afformentioned ailments. You are right that many people would be fine without it, but you are pressing this point way too hard.

Holto
01-29-2012, 02:07 PM
My point is, people just seem to "knee jerk" assume that fish oil and a multi vitamin will "help them", but I wonder if these people have simply been checked out to see if they lack anything these supplements are meant to provide.

Where do you get your DHA? After 20 years of studying nutrition I can tell you it's barely in any of our foods. You'd have to eat salmon several times per day to get the DHA that is one teaspoon of fish oil.

chris mason
01-29-2012, 05:55 PM
Let's grant this for the sake of argument.

If true, what does the addition of "adequate" fish oil (by supplementation or otherwise) do for the type of inflammation we are talking about here? Try to be specific in your response.

It is also well known that inflammation is part of the normal healing process inflammation, proliferation, and repair), so (when) is it a good idea to take something (NSAID) to interfere with the bodies normal processes?

As you respond (if you respond), keep in mind that the overarching question is always about the cost / benefit to fish oil supplementation (in other words, lets not get so bogged down in small details about inflammation and lose sight of the larger issues here).

I exercise on a near daily basis (cardio and/or resistance) and do not notice any inflammation problems I feel I need to address. I'm nearly 40 years old too.

Well, first, it isn't fish oil per se that is the trick, the actives are considered to be the Omega-3s in said oil (EPA and DHA). As you feel the myriad of potential cardiovascular health benefits which sufficient consumption of EPA and DHA can impart are not of interest to you there was some focus on inflammation.

The nutshell answer for you, and it would be impossible to be particularly specific as there are a huge amount of variables at work, is that inflammation is certainly a needed bodily response/function, but many experts also feel that excess inflammation is at least partially to blame for many of our current health woes. Taking NSAIDs chronically are not really the answer due to the potential negative side effects. Supplementing with fish oil, which is quite inexpensive, and or consuming sufficient Omega-3s from food sources may help to control for excess inflammation - being defined as more than is needed for optimal functioning of the body. The fact you don't FEEL you have excess inflammation is no indicator of your status.

ZAR-FIT
01-29-2012, 06:56 PM
NSAIDS slow protein synthesis.... no thank you

r2473
02-01-2012, 01:05 PM
Where do you get your DHA? After 20 years of studying nutrition I can tell you it's barely in any of our foods. You'd have to eat salmon several times per day to get the DHA that is one teaspoon of fish oil.

Let's say I don't get my recommended daily allowance of DHA. What are the negative consequences? Are what positive benefits am I potentially missing?

In other words, I don't want to look at the "means to an end" I want to look at the "end". The goals. First I want to evaluate if I'm not meeting goals I could be meeting. Then I'll look at ways to achieve those goals.

So "the driver" here is the goal. Acceptable cholesterol, blood pressure, etc levels. Then I'll evaluate "the tools" and decide which tool(s) work best for achieving the goal.

r2473
02-01-2012, 01:15 PM
many experts also feel that excess inflammation is at least partially to blame for many of our current health woes. Taking NSAIDs chronically are not really the answer due to the potential negative side effects. Supplementing with fish oil, which is quite inexpensive, and or consuming sufficient Omega-3s from food sources may help to control for excess inflammation - being defined as more than is needed for optimal functioning of the body. The fact you don't FEEL you have excess inflammation is no indicator of your status.

Which current health woes?

The way I'm reading this, an indicator that I have inflammation problems, is that they would manifest as "something else". What is / are the "something else"?

Believe it or not, I'm not really trying to be difficult. I just hate to be lazy in thought.

Look, I think most people take supplements because this type of analysis is difficult / impossible. The normal reasoning is something like,

"I can't say for sure if the supplements I take are helping me. But I don't see that they are hurting me. They are not expensive. I'm going to keep taking them as an "insurance policy". Mabye they will never do me any good, but I don't want to discover years later that all I had to do was take a little pill and I wouldn't be having these health problems".

And actually, I'm fine with this type of reasoning. I just fall on the other side of it.......meaning, I'm not willing to buy the insurance unless I can see the potential benefit. I just keep an eye on my leading health indicators. If they look good, the insurance doesn't make sense to me.

K-R-M
02-01-2012, 06:16 PM
Which current health woes?

The way I'm reading this, an indicator that I have inflammation problems, is that they would manifest as "something else". What is / are the "something else"?

Believe it or not, I'm not really trying to be difficult. I just hate to be lazy in thought.





Yes, you're being difficult, because this is information you could easily look at for yourself. Chronic inflammation is a cause of tissue damage of a wealth of devastating diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, tuberculosis, pulmonary fibrosis and is implicated in the progression of cancer and even diseases once thought to be purely degenerative like Alzheimer's disease. Find Robbins pathological basis of disease, read chapter 2 and find out for yourself what inflammation does, both good and bad. Considering weightlifters are prone to chronic inflammation through the sheer stress of the sport and repetitive motions, I see why so many decide to buy fish oil.

r2473
02-01-2012, 06:26 PM
Yes, you're being difficult, because this is information you could easily look at for yourself. Chronic inflammation is a cause of tissue damage of a wealth of devastating diseases like rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, tuberculosis, pulmonary fibrosis and is implicated in the progression of cancer and even diseases once thought to be purely degenerative like Alzheimer's disease. Find Robbins pathological basis of disease, read chapter 2 and find out for yourself what inflammation does, both good and bad. Considering weightlifters are prone to chronic inflammation through the sheer stress of the sport and repetitive motions, I see why so many decide to buy fish oil.

So the argument is that we need to take fish oil (even if we are relatively young...I'm 38) because we are at risk for rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, tuberculosis, pulmonary fibrosis, cancer and Alzheimer's?

And further, the risk will be mitigated by taking fish oil?

I guess I'm not buying it.

K-R-M
02-01-2012, 06:42 PM
So the argument is that we need to take fish oil (even if we are relatively young...I'm 38) because we are at risk for rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, tuberculosis, pulmonary fibrosis, cancer and Alzheimer's?

And further, the risk will be mitigated by taking fish oil?

I guess I'm not buying it.

You asked which current health woes were caused by chornic inflammation. You got a clear answer and a source for your own reading.

Fish oil mitigates some of these wealth woes, with cardiovascular disease risk reduction being significant.

Weightlifters are prone to inflammation due to nature of the sport, hence why ice and NSAIDS are recovery methods.

These are three seperate statements.

If you feel our answers are inadequate, I have no problem giving you ressources and access to information so you can make up your own mind. But, please don't waste our time with shitty answers like this one.

r2473
02-01-2012, 07:16 PM
You asked which current health woes were caused by chornic inflammation. You got a clear answer and a source for your own reading.

Fish oil mitigates some of these wealth woes, with cardiovascular disease risk reduction being significant.

Weightlifters are prone to inflammation due to nature of the sport, hence why ice and NSAIDS are recovery methods.

But, please don't waste our time with shitty answers like this one.

I think we are not on the same page.

If I have a health concern I go to my doctor. He give me a PERSONAL evaluation. A PERSONAL diagnosis. A PERSONAL plan to follow to get over MY specific problem.

You have given me myriad general, abstract reasons why SOMEONE might take fish oil.

What I'm getting at is, I doubt very much that YOU (or anyone on this board) suffers from rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, tuberculosis, pulmonary fibrosis. I wonder if people know if they are at risk for cardiovascular disease (I know I'm not). And for god's sake, if you are, I hope to god you are doing more than taking a few fish oil supps.

As for inflammation from lifting weights, I'll just have to take your word that fish oil alievates this. This would not be my first choice.

Yes, I know. Shitty answer.

See, what I'm saying is that you are taking something abstract written somewhere on some web site and some namesless, faceless "experts" opinion and taking your fish oil like you should.

I'm suggesting that you weigh the cost and potential benefit for YOU. YOUR OWN PERSONAL SITUATION. You wouldn't expect a doctor to just start prescribing you random stuff that sounds good without evaluating YOU first, would you? So why do you do it yourself?

I know, shitty answer. Well, sorry. I work in a medical office all day. That's just the way I'm trained to think.

Let me put it another way. You have decided to take fish oil.

1) Why. What benefits did you hope to achieve? What problems did you hope to alleviate?

2) OK, so now you've taken fish oil for a while. What have you seen? Have your cholesterol levels decreased (do you even know what they are)? Has your blood pressure improved (do you even know what your reading is)? Is it helping with your inflammation (do you even have inflammation). Please christ tell me that it is at least helping with your rheumatoid arthritis.

It's called "making informed decisions about your personal health". It's called being accountable.

It should not just be another habit that you do but don't know why (because the internet told you it was a good idea).

K-R-M
02-01-2012, 07:42 PM
This is a waste of time. This website is great because you get access to different people of different backgrounds for free. Since I'm on my way to becoming a physician, so I have access to a wealth of expensive ressources that I choose to share for free. I apply what works in a clinical setting for myself. If I'm trying to prevent primary cardiovascular disease in a patient, I'll offer dietary (which would include fish oil) and lifestyle changes before I undertake Beta-Blockers/ICEAs or any other more serious pharmacological options. Fish oil would be one tool, with proven clinical significance. These are not abstract reasons taken from random websites, but clinically proven, clear and significant reduction in markers linked to cardiovascular pathologies, on par with many pharmaceutical options, so how's that for one part of a treatment. And I'm 100% positive at least 1 person here suffers from atherosclerosis, it being the leading cause of cardiovascular mortality (which is the leading cause of mortality) in the US.

As for any other benefits, the easy and smart answer is this: try it for yourself. Keep the same variables through a few months, add in fish oil, check your markers, see how your recovery is and judge. If it does nothing, drop it, if you see added benefits, good. There are no side effects and it's a cheap product, so what do you have to lose with a product with such a wealth of research behind it. So tell me, what s the cost/potential benefit of 1000gs of fish oil for 20 bucks? Here's the answer: very good.

And you work in a medical office all day. Good, so does the janitor. Are you a doctor or not?

r2473
02-01-2012, 08:13 PM
That's what I'm suggesting EXCEPT you should first test for your health markers (what is my cholesterol? Does it need to be lowered or not? Etc). If you need to "fix" something, then do exactly what you suggest. Add in fish oil, check your markers, see how your recovery is and judge.

I'm an assistant greens keeper. They say that doesn't mean anything until I'm the head greenskeeper.

chris mason
02-01-2012, 08:50 PM
Primarily metabolic syndrome (constituents of it).

chris mason
02-01-2012, 08:58 PM
I think we are not on the same page.


What I'm getting at is, I doubt very much that YOU (or anyone on this board) suffers from rheumatoid arthritis, atherosclerosis, tuberculosis, pulmonary fibrosis. I wonder if people know if they are at risk for cardiovascular disease (I know I'm not). And for god's sake, if you are, I hope to god you are doing more than taking a few fish oil supps.



First, how exactly do you know you are not at risk for cardiovascular disease?

Next, you have made up your mind and regardless of what you are told it won't be changed. I am guessing you are one that suffers from paralysis by analysis. You definitely have overly dissected something as simple as taking supplemental fish oil. Look, it's cool, don't take it. No worries.

By the way, no one claims it will heal all. It is merely something that is generally recommended for its POTENTIAL health benefits.

r2473
02-01-2012, 09:18 PM
I simply mean I undertand the risk factors for cardio vascular disease and I don't rank high in any of the risk categories (well, I'm male, but fish oil won't change that).

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/risk-factors-heart-disease

Paralasysis by analysis? Maybe. I just think its common sense to first understand your personal situation and if you have a need. Something that fish oil could help with. Then monitor your progress.

That doesn't seem crazy or overly analytical to me.

djpc
02-02-2012, 04:18 AM
I guess one could adopt the "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" approach, and that's fine. Others might take a more proactive approach and say, "What can I do to give my body the best chance for long term success?" A simple nutritional adjustment that appears involved in reducing many forms of cellular aging and related maladies isn't a great leap of faith within the latter school of philosophy.

There's the old adage: "You don't stop moving because you get old, you get old because you stop moving". It's why I spend time 5-6 days a week in a gym. I could wait until I'm 75 and weak and overweight and unable to get up off a toilet without assistance before I think about maintaining strength and mobility. But I've chosen to think about them while I'm under 50 and to do what I can to preclude/delay their erosion. Who knows if I would ever hit that condition, perhaps all the work is unnecessary. But I've decided not to take that chance.

Alex.V
02-02-2012, 05:59 AM
If I have a health concern I go to my doctor. He give me a PERSONAL evaluation. A PERSONAL diagnosis. A PERSONAL plan to follow to get over MY specific problem.


If you REALLY think this is the case, then you don't really know doctors at all, in spite of working in a medical office. :)

38% of the US population has CAD. 1 in every 5 people in this country will die from it. Car crashes only kill about 1 in every 100 people. 30% of people in the US will be in a serious automobile accident in their lifetime. Yet you wear your seat belt. Your car has six airbags. Crumple zones. Any one of these things may or may not actually save your life, and yes, some help more than others. Yet some would argue that anything that shows sign of reducing injury or death is worth paying extra for. Fish oil is NOT really that expensive, yet it shows quite a bit of promise.

It's preventative medicine. If you were talking about taking "nameless supplement X" that's supposed to do a thousand things to make you stronger, faster, or somehow magically superhuman, and it cost thirty bucks a week, I'd say, yeah, question it. Question the hell out of it. If it was two or three poorly misinterpreted studies showing no definitive causality, no proposed mechanism, etc. etc., I'd call bullshit on it in a second. But that's not the case here.

True, if it ain't broke, don't fix it. But the epidemiology of CAD shows us that something IS broke. So we're all doing what we can to fix it.

While I'm at it, you said you doubt many people on this board suffer from atherosclerosis. Are you serious? Autopsies on FIFTEEN YEAR OLD ATHLETES these days show signs of early arterial hardening/occlusion. I would bet EVERY DAMN MEMBER of this board has some level of atherosclerosis- whether it's clinically significant and will cause death is another story.

You COULD check your cholesterol first. You could also get a chest MRI. The question is, what's your risk versus reward? If you work under the assumption that fish oil stands a good chance of reducing certain risk factors for a condition that most people on earth have, to some degree or another, then you can do your own cost/benefit analysis.

r2473
02-02-2012, 10:03 AM
If you REALLY think this is the case, then you don't really know doctors at all, in spite of working in a medical office. :).

Well, thats the theory anyway. But yes, doctors usually just go through the motions.


While I'm at it, you said you doubt many people on this board suffer from atherosclerosis. Are you serious? Autopsies on FIFTEEN YEAR OLD ATHLETES these days show signs of early arterial hardening/occlusion. I would bet EVERY DAMN MEMBER of this board has some level of atherosclerosis- whether it's clinically significant and will cause death is another story..

Good point. I guess I was thinking more in terms of your last statement.


You COULD check your cholesterol first. You could also get a chest MRI. The question is, what's your risk versus reward? If you work under the assumption that fish oil stands a good chance of reducing certain risk factors for a condition that most people on earth have, to some degree or another, then you can do your own cost/benefit analysis.

True. In some ways, there is no reason not to take fish oil. Its cheap, seems to actually produce results, and has few if any side effects (except you might stink like fish oil).

Personally, I don't like to introduce anything to my body that I don't need. I guess my theory is, once I introduce it, can I just stop it whenever I want? Or will my body adjust and start to "need" this supplement. At this point, I don't feel my body "needs" fish oil (what my body "needs" is exercise and solid nutrition habits).

I guess my only point has been that you should have some idea why you are taking anything (and not just take it to take it). And you should be able to in some way judge its effectiveness. And as I said, I'm not sure about introducing things your body doesn't need as the body is quite adaptive. But, once I "need" fish oil, it will probably be too late, right?

I guess my final point would be that, diet and exercise are more effective than a supplement. This may or may not apply to this crowd, but many people take supplements INSTEAD OF adopting good exercise and nutrition habits.

If we think about our health as a cake, diet and exercise are the flour, sugar, butter, eggs, and baking powder. Fish oil is somethng like the fancy decoration on top. Certainly is nice to have, but icing alone doesn't make for a very good cake.

Alex.V
02-02-2012, 11:06 AM
I guess my final point would be that, diet and exercise are more effective than a supplement. This may or may not apply to this crowd, but many people take supplements INSTEAD OF adopting good exercise and nutrition habits.

If we think about our health as a cake, diet and exercise are the flour, sugar, butter, eggs, and baking powder. Fish oil is somethng like the fancy decoration on top. Certainly is nice to have, but icing alone doesn't make for a very good cake.

This, I think, we can all agree on. There's nothing more disheartening than the folks who take every form of vitamin, mineral, herb, and other supplement under the sun, but still live a lifestyle that's abominably unhealthy. Washing down your fish oil with a large soda and snickers bar while loafing on your couch is probably not the recipe for long term health.

Absolutely, it's icing on the cake, and given that we all have limited funds (well, most of us, unless anybody happens to work for Facebook and is getting stock), we do need to be choosy about what we take. Certainly there's enough circumstantial evidence out there to take half the GNC in supplements. (Hey, let's all take garlic. And borage oil. And ginseng. And gingko. And ALA. And...) There's also always the consideration that supplements may harm us as well, unintentionally. (Nothing worse than overloading on something that MAY be helpful in certain doses, but is unintentionally devastating in large doses).

I think the fundamental disagreement we're having is really in the magnitude of our cost benefit analysis... at the end of the day, one camp is arguing that we DO have our diets and exercise in check, and fish oil is an inexpensive, well-studied, and low-side effect adjunct that we see no reason not to include.

The other camp (specifically, you. :) ) is arguing that there's no real guarantee it's helping your health, so it's essentially one of that large pool of supplements that's strictly on the "optional" list, a list that's not even worth getting into since it's so large and makes a small overall difference.

Different philosophies, and we all have our own thresholds.

dynamo
02-02-2012, 11:51 AM
I've been taking fish oil for a year now, but recently I switched to taking a more concentrated form where I am taking about 4000mg of EPA and 2000mg of DHA a day, and lately things have really been coming together. My focus is improving and my joints never hurt, although, even at lower concentrations they stopped hurting a long time ago. Its one of those supplements I take all the time because it works, I love that I can dead lift and squat and then go for a run with weight on my back, all within a 5 day time span, and not have to deal with hip or knee inflammation and tenderness.

As for sperm, that's great I guess, but I'm not trying to have babies any time soon. At the end of the day, just do what works for you.

josephrettig
02-02-2012, 12:13 PM
Thanks for your information about fish oil.

joseph rettig

r2473
02-02-2012, 02:54 PM
Different philosophies, and we all have our own thresholds.

Sounds about right.

I think it's similar to a multi-vitamin. They are cheap (I can buy a garbage can full at Costco for 50-cents or soemthing). They might help (lots of studies). Can't see any real downsides. Most people take them. Probably a good "insurance policy".

I have decided they really aren't worth the bother.

.....oh, by the way, I'm a CPA (not a doctor), but I work with doctors all day.

Perhaps being a CPA explains my unwillingness to spend the pittance fish oil costs. Probably.

Alex.V
02-03-2012, 07:03 AM
.....oh, by the way, I'm a CPA (not a doctor), but I work with doctors all day.

Perhaps being a CPA explains my unwillingness to spend the pittance fish oil costs. Probably.

A CPA working with doctors. You have my deepest condolences. I just moved into consulting/strategic planning in health care (working for a large hospital system)... a big part of this is hospital financials.

....ouch.

f=ma
02-03-2012, 01:23 PM
I'm a CPA (not a doctor), but I work with doctors all day.

me too. this is almost exactly what i do. finance + health care = the most boring day job imaginable. cheers, i share your pain.

+1 fish oil advocate. it can't hurt

f=ma
02-03-2012, 01:24 PM
A CPA working with doctors. You have my deepest condolences. I just moved into consulting/strategic planning in health care (working for a large hospital system)... a big part of this is hospital financials.

....ouch.
what hospital network? we are all over the SE region. (pm maybe?)

Alex.V
02-03-2012, 01:27 PM
UNCH. Clearly not the size of some meganetworks, but has the added joys that come along with being a state institution.

r2473
02-03-2012, 04:55 PM
me too. this is almost exactly what i do. finance + health care = the most boring day job imaginable. cheers, i share your pain.


UNCH. Clearly not the size of some meganetworks, but has the added joys that come along with being a state institution.

I'm with the U of U.

finance + health care + state institution = the most boring day job imaginable