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headache
02-22-2012, 04:09 PM
Havent posted on here in a while been busy with school and everything havent stopped lifting. I just started my third training cycle of sheiko37 this past monday, I've had great results in the past my question is after this one should I graduate to a more advance variation of it? The others are kind of confusing so thats why I stuck with 37 this time around. Im coming off of alot of dynamic band resistance work hitting a few big PR's in the last few weeks. Im sure this is going to yeild strong PR's but my question is if anyone has ventured to do the other cycles written by Boris Sheiko and are they worth trying?

Butcher
02-22-2012, 04:38 PM
Eric Talmant has a pretty good DVD explaining a lot of the theory and reasoning behind the Sheiko programs and the one point he continously makes is doing a Sheiko program that is for a higher rated lifter than you is a great way to fail. Not that I am familiar with the ranking to advised program but make sure it is appropriate.

headache
02-23-2012, 09:08 AM
I can see that they look confusing. Ill have to look him up thank you.

Niko_El_Piko
02-24-2012, 01:51 PM
People generally start with Sheiko #29. Then go to #32.

Somebody stated up there about Eric Talment and David Bates. He has a 13 week programme here (http://doc.erictalmant.com/13 wk beginner program.doc).

I donīt like Sheiko routines. I believe on the other hand that they are good for intermediate lifters, and rather new to the sport of powerlifting. You will work with rather low intensity (about 71% average).

I wouldnīt stand lifting 3x2x80%.

kingns
02-24-2012, 06:35 PM
one of my friends runs the 4 day a week one. I dont know how he does it. THere a lot of different #'s out there for sheiko and they are all pretty similar, just more or less volume. I would start w the one you mentioned, and after you have adjusted to the volume consider a more advanced one. THere are recommendations for which ones you do based on your total

burt128
02-24-2012, 07:41 PM
I've been training using Sheiko training for about 6 months now. I like everything about it except for the length of the workouts -- most of my sessions are lasting around 2.5 hours. My numbers are up, however, so I'll take it.

I'd try 37, 37, 32 and then test maxes. If you want some good advice on using the Sheiko cycles, I'd check the BMF board, though it has been a little dead lately. There is also a spreadsheet floating around out there that has tabs for the various cycles and it makes things pretty easy as far as calculating maxes, etc.

kingns
02-25-2012, 07:35 AM
you can also split the workout into two sessions a day to save time if you cant do a 3 hour block. Instead of squat, bench, squat, assistance.... you can squat bench, break, squat assistance later

burt128
02-25-2012, 10:07 AM
Getting to the gym twice a day is more difficult for me than one long session.

burt128
02-25-2012, 10:12 AM
I donīt like Sheiko routines. I believe on the other hand that they are good for intermediate lifters, and rather new to the sport of powerlifting. You will work with rather low intensity (about 71% average).

I don't agree with this. I've seen at least three lifters who have been powerlifting for 10 or more years, myself included, make gains using this style of training. I was skeptical at first -- how can lots of volume with relatively low intensity lead to strength gains? Honestly, I'm still not sure how or why it works, but it has for me. I went into my first run at it expecting that when I got to 90%+ weights they'd feel heavy. For whatever reason, that just wasn't the case and I set raw prs at my meet in squat, bench and total.

Niko_El_Piko
02-25-2012, 08:47 PM
I don't agree with this. I've seen at least three lifters who have been powerlifting for 10 or more years, myself included, make gains using this style of training. I was skeptical at first -- how can lots of volume with relatively low intensity lead to strength gains? Honestly, I'm still not sure how or why it works, but it has for me. I went into my first run at it expecting that when I got to 90%+ weights they'd feel heavy. For whatever reason, that just wasn't the case and I set raw prs at my meet in squat, bench and total.

I donīt know your how much weight you or the 3 powerlifters with more than 10 years of experience "lift", but the thing is pretty easy: There are Classes.

There are levels stated by Sheiko, and according to them is the type of training. People tend to overlook this matter, and just pop into a #29 or #32 programme and feel they get great results.

The good thing about Sheiko for newbies in powerlifting, is that they lift often.

2 youth levels, then Level 3, 2 and 1, and after that "Candidate of Master in sport", "Master in sport" and "Master in sport international Class".

AS you go up in levels, your intensity of 1 RM goes up. You end up training in the 90% working tons of Supplementary and accesory work, in routines very similar to Westside, except that they use insane volume.

For a 220lb MSIC your overall weight in the 3 lifts should be 1820.

Look for the routines Andry Belyaev does. They donīt look like nothing of the regular sheiko.

In the long run, youīll get better results training the way people around here does. Itīs proven.

burt128
02-26-2012, 09:37 AM
I donīt know your how much weight you or the 3 powerlifters with more than 10 years of experience "lift", but the thing is pretty easy: There are Classes.

There are levels stated by Sheiko, and according to them is the type of training. People tend to overlook this matter, and just pop into a #29 or #32 programme and feel they get great results.

The good thing about Sheiko for newbies in powerlifting, is that they lift often.

2 youth levels, then Level 3, 2 and 1, and after that "Candidate of Master in sport", "Master in sport" and "Master in sport international Class".

AS you go up in levels, your intensity of 1 RM goes up. You end up training in the 90% working tons of Supplementary and accesory work, in routines very similar to Westside, except that they use insane volume.

For a 220lb MSIC your overall weight in the 3 lifts should be 1820.

Look for the routines Andry Belyaev does. They donīt look like nothing of the regular sheiko.

In the long run, youīll get better results training the way people around here does. Itīs proven.

I'm a level one lifter based on the 1989 chart, all lifts raw. If you add gear into the mix, I'm MS. The two other lifters I mentioned are both MS. Both have been training Sheiko for much longer than I have.

Don't get me wrong, training using the Westside principles is great -- I trained that way for many years and I made good progress. But it isn't the end all be all of training systems. There are a lot of ways to get strong and implying that Sheiko programs are only appropriate for people new to powerlifting simply isn't accurate.