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View Full Version : Question About Tuna. Harmful?!?



viperc8
02-28-2012, 08:23 PM
Hey guys. So I eat one of these bumble bee tuna steak pouches (lemon pepper flavor) http://www.foodprocessing.com/articles/2005/408.html everyday and was wondering if it is totally healthy to eat. I am asking because the warnings of mercury or methymercury in tuna. And I was also asking because if you look at the nutrition facts it has a good bit of cholesterol. Here is the nutrition facts label and this website rated it a D-!!
http://caloriecount.about.com/calories-bumble-bee-prime-fillet-albacore-i88870
So its a reason of concern to me and was thinking what you guys thought about it. Thanks alot.

K Y L E
02-29-2012, 01:02 AM
There's nothing wrong with eating tuna fish. You won't get mercury poisoning.

drew
02-29-2012, 05:54 AM
I don't recall the exact number but I remember it being something like 20 cans of tuna per day for an extended period of time before you are in any danger of mercury poisoning (according to EPA guidelines, which are probably very conservative).

When compared to some other fish, tuna is not really that high in mercury content. I believe Tilefish is the highest, and swordfish is up there as well.

clsmilek
02-29-2012, 09:39 AM
I believe Tilefish is the highest, and swordfish is up there as well.

And so f*cking delicious as well. I remember the day I switched grocery stores and stocked up on swordfish instead of tuna. Never looked back.

viperc8
02-29-2012, 08:09 PM
Then I am just wondering why the website gave that tuna product a D- rating. Thanks

drew
03-01-2012, 06:18 AM
Then I am just wondering why the website gave that tuna product a D- rating. Thanks

Based on that website's grading system, it was most likely because it is considered high in sodium and cholesterol. The grading has nothing to do with mercury content (it actually sad nothing about that on that particular website). It also doesn't take into account that you are (or should be) eating a balanced diet. It's more than likely that they use the "nutrition grade" as a way to make their website seem legit, marketable and a source of knowledge. In reality it just doesn't give you any information at all.

viperc8
03-01-2012, 12:02 PM
It still is a little concerning that it was graded that poorly. Sodium and cholesterol aren't good things..

Alex.V
03-01-2012, 12:20 PM
Too much sodium isn't a good thing. Some sodium is absolutely essential.

Dietary cholesterol has almost zero impact on serum cholesterol. Not something most healthy people need to worry about.

drew
03-02-2012, 07:39 AM
Too much sodium isn't a good thing. Some sodium is absolutely essential.

Dietary cholesterol has almost zero impact on serum cholesterol. Not something most healthy people need to worry about.

Now you change your name? I can't stand this. Don't change the red devil or I will have NO idea who you are.

I have always heard that dietary cholesterol doesn't have an impact but can you tell me what does? I have a family history of high cholesterol and I have had borderline high cholesterol for years. Without taking drugs what are the important factors to reducing cholestorol? (Seriously, my doctor always tries to get me on drugs and get me to lose a pile of weight when my levels have been almost the same whether I have been 170lbs or 230).

Alex.V
03-02-2012, 07:54 AM
I know, but hey, I figure my charming posts and, yes, the little devil dude make me recognizable.

It's a big topic full of disagreement, but...

I did say ALMOST zero... I've seen some evidence that high dietary cholesterol can have a marginal impact on serum levels, but really close to 90% of the serum cholesterol is synthesized by your body. Genetic predisposition is a major, major factor... some cardiologists I've spoken to here involved in research think that it might even be the only factor really worth looking at. (Though hormones play a role as well)

Some would argue that it's fat intake, not cholesterol. The biggest issue with even this argument is that many kinds of fats raise HDL, including certain kinds of saturated fat. So, long story short, trying to be selective about what fats you take in is likely an exercise in futility, or even counterproductive.

Truly, there's not much you can do. Fish oil might be useful, but since most of us are unwilling to test out major changes in body composition (would losing 75 pounds and reducing caloric intake by 50% help? Possibly.), we're sort of stuck.

drew
03-02-2012, 08:29 AM
OK, pretty much all of what I've gathered. Right now my plan is to up the dose of fish oil that I'm taking and increase my conditioning work. I'd really prefer not to take drugs.

Thanks.

Stonecutter
03-03-2012, 05:38 AM
It still is a little concerning that it was graded that poorly. Sodium and cholesterol aren't good things..
Like Alex said, sodium is essential. And having "too much" is only relative to your potassium intake. The current desired ratio of K:Na is about 2:1, so the total amount is not really the issue. That said, most people don't get enough potassium so you may want to focus more on that. The same idea applies to cholesterol. Cholesterol itself is also essential, but more important than your total cholesterol level IMO is the HDL:LDL ratio.

Alex.V
03-03-2012, 09:31 AM
That's exactly what leftover cabbage root

Suddenly I the entire thing.

JacobH
03-03-2012, 03:03 PM
Suddenly I the entire thing.

Thank you for this was very information!!!!

sCaRz*Of*PaiN
03-04-2012, 02:57 PM
Highest Mercury
AVOID Eating

Marlin
Orange roughy
Tilefish
Swordfish
Shark
Mackerel (king)
Tuna ( bigeye, Ahi)


High Mercury
Eat no more than three 6-oz servings per month

Sea Bass (Chilean)
Bluefish
Grouper
Mackeral ( Spanish, Gulf)
Tuna (canned, white albacore) See tuna chart below
Tuna ( Yellowfin)


Lower Mercury
Eat no more than six 6-oz servings per month

Bass ( Striped, Black)
Carp
Cod ( Alaskan)
Croaker ( White Pacific)
Halibut ( Pacific and Atlantic) Jacksmelt ( Silverside)
Lobster
Mahi Mahi
Monkfish
Perch (freshwater)
Sablefish
Skate
Snapper
Sea Trout ( Weakfish)
Tuna (canned, chunk light)
Tuna (Skipjack)


Lowest Mercury
Enjoy two 6-oz servings per week

Anchovies
Butterfish
Catfish
Clam
Crab (Domestic)
Crawfish/crayfish
Croaker
Flounder
Haddock
Hake
Herring
Mackeral (N Atlantic, Chub)
Mullet
Oysters
Perch (ocean)
Plaice
Salmon ( Canned, Fresh)
Sardines
Scallops
Shad ( American)
Shrimp
Sole
Squid ( Calamari)
Tilapia
Trout (freshwater)
Whitefish
Whiting


Not sure how accurate this list is, but it seems like a good basis. Tuna generally isn't too bad, but other places preach really ridiculous things like 2 cans a month. Many things are okay in moderation. I personally friggin' love tuna.

AiCPearlJam
03-06-2012, 07:41 PM
This discussion should be null in void. I went to the Culinary Institute of America for half a year before deciding that wasting my life away in a kitchen wasn't for me. Anyway, the first day of fish and seafood class our chef broke many myths about fish and seafood products. Did you know that if you go fishing and your hands gets smelly fish residue on them, wash them with toothpaste and it'll take all the stank off.

But that's not all. He also showed us a factual stat stating that there hasn't been a recorded mercury poisoning case involving fish/seafood consumption. Not even fetal mercury poisoning during pregnancy. The fact is that you would have to eat an insane amount fish to ever come close to getting mercury poisoning.