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geoffgarcia
06-13-2002, 03:02 PM
I want to make sure that I am eating a healthy diet that is supportive of muscle growth and will help keep me on a plan to lower my bodyfat.

M-F my diet is fairly regular and it is:
8:30 bowl of Kashi-Go Lean (high fiber/protein) ceral + Soy Milk + 3 egg whites.
10:00 cup of coffee + danno light yogurt
11:30 3oz can of StarKist Light tuna in water
12:30- I go for a 30 minute run
2: another 3oz can of tuna and a piece of whole wheat bread with some honey
4:30 another 3oz can of tuna
6:30 I go to the gym, typical workout last 30-45 minutes, usually 6 sets of abs, 9-12 of another muscle group/groups
7:00 after gym I have a Champion Nutrition protein bar
8:30 dinner, usually 2 chicken breats, maybe some veggies or rice
9:30 banana
10:30 2 egg whites


I know it looks fairly regimented but I don't look at the clock, when you eat like this it becomes second nature after a while.

Maybe one day a week I'll go out to dinner and have a salad with grilled chicken breast.

And maybe one day during the weekend I'll eat whatever I want (and a lot of it) How bad is this? does it defeat the purpose of a good diet all week? 1 bad meal sets you back how many days of good nutrition? 3-5-8?

My question, does it look like I'm getting enough calories? I've been doing this for about 2-3 months, and have had little weight change (not that i'm looking to add/lose weight)
but I have noticed that I don't have as much energy as when I didn't watch my diet at all...

Thoughts opinions on my diet???

I am 26 years old.
8.5%bf
5'10
175lbs
workout 4-5 days a week, run 3-4 days a week.

Shao-LiN
06-14-2002, 01:32 AM
doesn't look like you get a lot of carbs...could account for the loss of energy.

Avatar
06-14-2002, 08:39 AM
I didn't really look at the diet part but can tell you you won't be gaining too much muscle working out 4-5x/week and running 3-4x/week.

MRJ
06-14-2002, 11:38 AM
Originally posted by geoffgarcia
I want to make sure that I am eating a healthy diet that is supportive of muscle growth and will help keep me on a plan to lower my bodyfat.

M-F my diet is fairly regular and it is:
8:30 bowl of Kashi-Go Lean (high fiber/protein) ceral + Soy Milk + 3 egg whites.
10:00 cup of coffee + danno light yogurt
11:30 3oz can of StarKist Light tuna in water
12:30- I go for a 30 minute run
2: another 3oz can of tuna and a piece of whole wheat bread with some honey
4:30 another 3oz can of tuna
6:30 I go to the gym, typical workout last 30-45 minutes, usually 6 sets of abs, 9-12 of another muscle group/groups
7:00 after gym I have a Champion Nutrition protein bar
8:30 dinner, usually 2 chicken breats, maybe some veggies or rice
9:30 banana
10:30 2 egg whites


I know it looks fairly regimented but I don't look at the clock, when you eat like this it becomes second nature after a while.

Maybe one day a week I'll go out to dinner and have a salad with grilled chicken breast.

And maybe one day during the weekend I'll eat whatever I want (and a lot of it) How bad is this? does it defeat the purpose of a good diet all week? 1 bad meal sets you back how many days of good nutrition? 3-5-8?

My question, does it look like I'm getting enough calories? I've been doing this for about 2-3 months, and have had little weight change (not that i'm looking to add/lose weight)
but I have noticed that I don't have as much energy as when I didn't watch my diet at all...

Thoughts opinions on my diet???

I am 26 years old.
8.5%bf
5'10
175lbs
workout 4-5 days a week, run 3-4 days a week.

Greetings:

To summarize:

Eat below/at/above your BMR (plus daily activities) dependent upon your goal. (gain/maintain/lose weight)

Consume 1g - 1/lb. of protein (typical amount)

Keep your carb. intake of the low-GI variety. (ex. post work-out)
and manage the total amount based upon the sensitivity of your system.

Keep your fat intake of the essential variety.

Spread the calories, etc. evenly or thereabout via consuming 5 or more meals p/day.

Without specifics of goals, food amounts, macro breakdowns, current body composition, etc. any input can only be of the general variety.

Hope this helps.

geoffgarcia
06-14-2002, 01:44 PM
Avatar-
why won't I be gaining much muscle with my running/lifting regime?




MRJ-
I think I answered most of your questions in my original post....

My goal is to lose bf primarily, I'm at 8.7-9.2 right now, I'd like to be down between 6.8-7.4 by the end of august, and secondary emphesis on maintaining muscle

How much more of a breakdown of my diet do you need? The actual number of calories, fat, cars, protein per week/per day?

and how much more body composition is there than saying I'm 26 years old, 8.7-9.2%bf, 5'10, 175lbs?

What is the low-GI variety of carbs? what is the high-GI?
What is GI?

As you can see my by diet I do spread my meals out quite well 5-10 meals a day.

I'm a beginner:) I need questions with a little more detail behind them.

MRJ
06-14-2002, 03:03 PM
Originally posted by geoffgarcia
Avatar-
why won't I be gaining much muscle with my running/lifting regime?

MRJ-

I think I answered most of your questions in my original post....

My goal is to lose bf primarily, I'm at 8.7-9.2 right now, I'd like to be down between 6.8-7.4 by the end of august, and secondary emphesis on maintaining muscle

How much more of a breakdown of my diet do you need? The actual number of calories, fat, cars, protein per week/per day?



and how much more body composition is there than saying I'm 26 years old, 8.7-9.2%bf, 5'10, 175lbs?

What is the low-GI variety of carbs? what is the high-GI?
What is GI?
As you can see my by diet I do spread my meals out quite well 5-10 meals a day.

I'm a beginner:) I need questions with a little more detail behind them.

GI = is Glycemic Index.

Low GI = Things which will not cause a rapid increase in blood sugar.

High GI = The opposite of Low GI, in the sense it causes rapid increase in blood sugar levels.

Diet Details:

The percentages of each. Ex. 40%p/20%f/40%c per meal, per day, etc.

Regarding the body composition comment:

I missed your stats. My bad.

Cardio/Lifting:

I don't agree with this comment, but many do. I suppose the theory is if you're running & lifting it would be difficult to consume enough calories to promote growth. Or in the case of running the muscles within would be worked continually, therefore not allowing for the appropriate amount of down-time to allow for repair and growth. I do cardio specific exercise 2 x weekly on the treadmill. Additionally, run hills/bleachers & x/c, Mt. Bike, swim, play tennis, hike and such and it hasn't had a negative impact on my training that I'm aware of. I simply ensure I'm taking-in enough calories and give my legs a day of reciovery after I complete resistance training, then off I go.

Seems like your b/f is pretty low already and to lower such more would call for drastic measures. (real low carb. diet and so on)

Why the big concern with b/f ? Based upon the low end of the percentages (current/goal) you note, we're talking 3 pounds or so.

Recall, to maintain the same weight but lose fat we're talking about a 6 pound swing. Not that big of a difference to me, but then again I'm a 10% b/f guy and very content.

Hope this helps, good luck to ya !

Jane
06-14-2002, 06:13 PM
Kashi GoLean cereal is the best cereal ever created!
:clap:
I will never, ever get tired of that stuff...could eat it for lunch, dinner, anything at all...:)

geoffgarcia
06-14-2002, 07:03 PM
Isn't it!?
When I first got it, I was like oh boy, this stuff is gonna taste like ass....but holy hell!!! I've got 5 boxes of it sitting here in front of me:)
For those of you that aren't familiar with it here is a breakdown:
Calories:120
Fat:1
Carbs:28
Sugars:7
Dietary Fiber:10 (9insoluable fiber, 1 soluable fiber
Protein:8(soy)
Serving size:3/4 cup (40g)

I take it with soy milk also, I think the stuff I take is Silk ? don't remember

Jane
06-14-2002, 07:28 PM
Run a search on the effects of soy on males...you may change to skim milk. :)

My absolute favorite thing to do is to get .5 cup of Kashi GoLean, .25 cup of Kashi Good Friends, and .25 cup of Puffed Kashi (for volume) and add lots of skim milk. Tons of fiber..crunchy...protein enriched...delicious. :D

tudmuf2b
06-14-2002, 08:14 PM
http://www.getbuf.com/soy.htm


Soy Protein
Soy, Estrogen and You!

The amount of attention that soy has been receiving in the U.S. has been astounding considering there are no conclusive, long term studies on the effects of soy and/or soy isoflavones on humans. I would like you to note that published studies from Universities and Medical researchers differ greatly between the US and most of Europe. This is probably due to the fact that the US government has been actively promoting soy and funding research that is in favor of soy to boost the US agricultural economy.

Science and Soy:

The fact of the matter is soy research is not complete and it may have as many harmful characteristics as helpful. Current soy research is best explained by Herman Adlercreutz, M.D., of the University of Helsinki, Finland: “no evidence in the literature suggesting that phytoestrogens (plant estrogens), present in such amounts in human food that they could have biological effects, stimulate already existing cancer, and there is also no evidence that such phytoestrogens could initiate cancer." Ref#1

Soy and Menopause:

After menopause or a hysterectomy a women produces less estrogen. Soy isoflavones do look promising in stimulating estrogen receptors that are neglected because of decreased production of natural estrogen by the body. There has also been some indication that the stimulation of estrogen receptors after menopause or hysterectomy can retard the onset of osteoporosis. Quite a few studies indicate that soy may reduce the intensity and/or the frequency of “Hot flashes” in menopausal women.

Soy and Child Development:

Very little research has been done indicating whether the phytoestrogens found in soy can alter endocrine development in children. So far the only documented research on prepubescent mammals has been performed on rats. The hormonal development of a fetus could also be effected by an abundance of phytoestrogens; again adequate studies on humans have not been performed to draw a concrete conclusion either way.

The following are results from some of the only studies done on the effects of phytoestrogens in mammals:

· Rat pups, exposed to high doses of the plant estrogen coumestrol (found in sunflower seeds and oil and alfalfa sprouts) through their mother's milk, suffered permanent reproductive problems: female pups when grown did not ovulate, and males had altered mounting behavior and fewer ejaculations (2).

Neonatal and immature rats exposed to coumestrol experienced estrogen-related responses, such as premature estrous cycles. Coumestrol also interrupted ovarian cycles in adult female rats (3).
Newborn rats exposed to the phytoestrogen genistein (a compound found in soy products), experienced altered hormone secretions and the onset of puberty may have been delayed because female rats were exposed to the compound as fetuses (3).

Effects of soy in men:

A major concern of men is the possible effects of soy on the male endocrine (hormonal) system. While there have been few studies addressing the effects of phytoestrogen in males, what conclusions have been drawn are negative. 3a, 17B- androstanediol glucuronide and androstanediol glucuronide are DHT metabolites and are essential for male secondary sex characteristics as well as the anabolism of skeletal muscle. Obviously decreases in these hormones mean less lean mass, more stored body fat, and a possible retardation of male secondary sex characteristics.


“In males, levels of 17B-estradiol and testosterone were not affected, but levels of 3a, 17B- androstanediol glucuronide (a metabolite of dihydrotestosterone) and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate were decreased by 13% and 14%, respectively, after 2-4 weeks of daily soya ingestion.” (8)

Soy and Cancer:

Soy research has indicated that it may contain cancer-preventing properties by binding to estrogen receptors there by disabling estrogen from further stimulating cancer cells much as tamoxifen citrate does. The isoflavones found in soy are antioxidants and can help decrease damage from free radicals however most antioxidants in the American diet are derived from other sources than isoflavones. The effects of soy on preexisting cancer are unclear and supplementing soy for modern cancer treatments (as suggested by a few so-called health care professionals) is not only careless it’s down right irresponsible and unprofessional.

a. Genistein (a predominant component of soy), which has only 1/1,000 the hormonal activity of estrogen, attaches to the breast cells (4) estrogen receptors and by doing so blocks the more potent female hormone from attaching. (5)

b. Recent research by Catherine Rice-Evans, Ph.D., co-director of the International Antioxidant Research Center at Guy's Hospital, London, has demonstrated that isoflavones are also powerful antioxidants. Like other antioxidants, they can reduce the long-term risk of cancer by preventing free radical damage to deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA).

c. Two recent studies conducted by a team of American and Chinese researchers found that Daidzein (a component of soy) may reduce the risk of cancer by activating immune cells. In experiments with laboratory mice, researchers found that Daidzein, but not genistein, increased the activity of lymphocytes (T cells) and macrophages (a type of white blood cell). (6)

d. Although soy isoflavones look promising in the prevention of breast and endometrial cancers, researchers and clinicians have expressed caution and are reluctant to use the substances in the treatment of active cancer. Although isoflavones may help treat some cancers, the data are inconclusive; hence the hesitation. Charles Simone, M.D., author of Breast Health (Avery, 1995), discourages his breast cancer patients from eating any soy foods because their effect on active cancers is not known. (7)

A possible explanation of why plants produce phytoestrogens:

Some scientists believe that plants make phytoestrogens as a defense mechanism to stop or limit predation by plant-eating animals (9,10,11). Instead of protecting themselves with thistles or thorns or tasting bad, these plants use chemicals that affect the predatory animal's fertility.

Although using estrogen-mimicking compounds for protection may sound far-fetched, it makes sense from an evolutionary stance. Many real-life examples support the theory that plants and animals change together, or co-evolve, over time.

The explanation goes something like this: to avoid predation, plants produce compounds (phytoestrogens) that limit an herbivores reproduction. Thus, the predator's population decreases and more plants prosper.

But remember, because of genetic differences, not all species or individuals of a given species will react to the phytoestrogens in the same way. While some herbivores may show fertility problems, others may acquire resistance - like some insects are resistant to pesticides and some bacteria that can survive antibiotics. Likewise, some humans may be more susceptible to the benefits and risks of phytoestrogens than others.

geoffgarcia
06-24-2002, 03:52 PM
wow, I'm glad I came back to re-read this one!!!! Consider the soy out of my ceral, and so much for the soy protein powder I use now and then!!!

Thank you!!!



I have logged my diet for the past 8 days and have attached an excel spreadsheet if anyone has the time to give me some comments that would be great!!!

my 7 day avg is the following:
calories:1929
protein178 (37%)
fat:39 (8%)
carbs:190 (39%)

This is broken down into 4-6 meals per day.

I'm 26, 5'10
174 lbs now (lost 3 over the last 2 weeks)
9%bf as of 5/20

My goal is to continue to lose bf for a vacation to the bahamas in Sept. Ideally I'd like to see 7.5% (get measure at local gym with 3-5 pinch caliper thingers)

Then I will transition to a bulking stage for a few months.

I've stopped running at lunch, now I go outside and just soak in the sun:)

I'll post my diet again in a few weeks when more data has been gathered, and I'll chart weight/caloric intake/protein intake
I love making charts like this (I did this in the past for 3 months and was amazed at how everything works together:)

Tiare
06-24-2002, 04:29 PM
At 5'10" 9% bf you should be looking fine, if anything, I'd look at gaining lean mass, not cutting body fat. For most people, cutting fat at under 10% becomes very difficult.

What I'm saying is that you might do better by increasing your intake of food by say 500 to 1000 calories a day and switching to a growth workout (i.e. 3 days a week maybe 4 if you recover fast of intense lifting and stop doing abs every day, at most 2 times a week unless you are on gear in which case you can do more exercise) and lean on cardio/aerobics to cut body fat rather than decreased food intake.

Oh, and with the caliper testing at the gym, if the people doing it don't have a ruler and felt tip pen in their hand marking spots to check, they are just winging it and the results are only nominally accurate. At best within 2% to 3% if they are experienced and could be way off if they aren't experienced. Also, there are a massive number of ways to calculate it even if they do measure correctly so if they are just grabbing the 'standard' chart, it might not be applicable to your body. A person who is very active athletically will not be measured accurately by most gyms.