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vdizenzo
06-03-2012, 07:55 AM
I usually do cardio 1-3 times a week. I keep it to 20 minutes. Sometimes it's Low Intensity Steady State and sometimes it's High Intensity Interval Training. However, with the HIIT stuff I am not burning tread of my sneakers.

I want to start doing more sessions every week. I just feel better when I do cardio conditioning. If I'm not killing it on the treadmill what are the thoughts on hitting it everyday? I know I can watch my strength level, just curious to hear some thoughts before I start.

Rob Luyando
06-03-2012, 09:15 AM
I wouldn't do it everyday! Pick it up to 3 30 min sessions of HIIT. If you feel more do some sleg dragging, tire flipps, or sledge on tire, on your off cardio days.

kingns
06-03-2012, 11:51 AM
If I dont atleast take my dog on a walk I feel like crap. I think you can/should do atleast easy cardio on off days. I dont know about HIIT though. This sorta depends on your lifestyle. If you are active on your off days and have an active job you can probly skip a day or two. But if you sit all day at work like a lot of us doing some cardio everyday is a good idea

ZAR-FIT
06-03-2012, 11:59 AM
if you have access to a stair mill use that over the treadmill. i'll kick your ass so much more. i start my day off with it 5x a week. 25-30 for maintainance, 60 for losing fat.

Alex.V
06-03-2012, 01:09 PM
Do NOT do HIIT. Your cardio should absolutely NOT be tapping into those glycogen stores and exhausting the same fiber types that you want to keep strong for lifting. Tire flipping and all that GPP stuff is working against your goals- if you want to keep a strong bench, you need to focus all your anerobic/strength work on improving your bench, not exhausting those same systems flipping a tire.

Slow, steady state cardio. Heart rate low, stay aerobic, and you can easily do it every day and not lose strength. Leave your bench press muscles out of it- they get enough stress.

Trust me on this one.

vdizenzo
06-03-2012, 01:48 PM
Do NOT do HIIT. Your cardio should absolutely NOT be tapping into those glycogen stores and exhausting the same fiber types that you want to keep strong for lifting. Tire flipping and all that GPP stuff is working against your goals- if you want to keep a strong bench, you need to focus all your anerobic/strength work on improving your bench, not exhausting those same systems flipping a tire.

Slow, steady state cardio. Heart rate low, stay aerobic, and you can easily do it every day and not lose strength. Leave your bench press muscles out of it- they get enough stress.

Trust me on this one.

Interesting, what do you recommend the highest I allow my heart rate to get to?

Alex.V
06-03-2012, 01:51 PM
I'd try to keep it under 120 (This is pretty individual). Really, a conversational pace- the guideline I use is that if I can technically breathe through my nose and not pass out (don't have to gasp for air) while jogging, it's about the right pace.

The 20 mile runs and 100 mile bikes I do don't hurt my strength like the 10 minute sprint workouts.

MichaelPowell
06-03-2012, 02:19 PM
I mountain bike on non lifting days, generally the days after squats / deadlifts and sometimes after bench days. I ride anywhere from 5-15 miles depending on terrain and at varying intensity levels. I have seen no adverse affects on any strength levels unless I ride and squat on the same day obviously. To the contrary, I'd say that the hill climbing has helped my squat and my cardio to a great degree so long as I plan my ride lengths out so that I'm recovered come the next squat day. I mean you wouldn't want to go ride trails then try to set some record or something but the conditioning is great in my opinion and it's loads of fun.

Justin Randal
06-03-2012, 03:16 PM
Keeping you heart rate around 120 will help burn fat but for me didn't much help me feel very good. When I'm on the treadmill (or any other cardio equipment) I try to keep my heart rate between 150-160. I typically get in 2-3x30 min sessions of cardio every week and occasionally use circuit training in place of cardio. For instancre, on some speed squat days I will swing a kettle bell for 10-15 reps during what would usually be my rest period and get right back to speed squats with no rest and jump straight on the treadmil for 15-20 min when I'm done. I always find myself drenched by the time I get to the treadmill. I typically just stick to 1 or 2 sessions in the weeks leading up to a meet.

Alex.V
06-03-2012, 03:43 PM
Right, guys, but bear in mind he was talking about ramping it up to more than 2-3 days a week. If you mountain biked or pushed it hard every single day, no way you'd recover.

MichaelPowell
06-03-2012, 04:15 PM
how bout swimming? I was thinking about doing some laps down at the pool. Back when I was a kid I surfed and don't ever remember getting too beat up from that kind of thing. can swim fast, slow, whatever. Maybe a few min in the steam room then laps etc.

ScottYard
06-04-2012, 05:58 AM
I did Hiit when cutting for the Arnold. I would Sprint for 30 second then rest for 3 minutes and repeat 5-6 times. I did this for 6-7 weeks two times per week. my hr would hut 180. I lost weight, and felt awesome but my legs always felt tired. It will affect your strength. But it depends how it fits into your overall goals.

Now I'm im doing easy steady state two times per week with one day of light farmers and sled drags. My legs feel fine and I feel in shape. Give it a shot vinny. worse that will happy is you will be really healthy. Your not exactly a spring chicken and I'm sure your wife wants you around for a long time. Go for it.

Alex.V
06-04-2012, 07:36 AM
how bout swimming? I was thinking about doing some laps down at the pool. Back when I was a kid I surfed and don't ever remember getting too beat up from that kind of thing. can swim fast, slow, whatever. Maybe a few min in the steam room then laps etc.

Swimming's good, but too much of that kills my bench. Still, nice and low impact, if you don't sink like a rock (like I do) it can be a good way to get some cardio in there without beating up your body. Rotate between freestyle and breaststroke to give your shoulders a break. (Bigger dudes tend to not be built for freestyle/crawl)

Think about it this way- most of you guys lifting specifically for strength, picture what's going on when you push hard on pedals or run up a hill. If you were training for a big squat, would you incorporate 30 minutes of doing DE half squats with a totally different form and 20% of your max weight on the bar? Nah. It might improve your work capacity, but it's running counter to all the specific training you're doing to build maximum power in your legs in a few chosen movements.

Anyhow, just my observations. Hey, any cardio is better than no cardio, like Scott said. Stay healthy, gents. If y'all don't, there'll be nobody left to teach the rest of us how to not be weak.

ehubbard
06-04-2012, 01:28 PM
Vincent, How does this correlate with your other post in your log about getting sidetracked with ancillary goals. Stick to what has been working and go bench 600 at 275.... :)

RhodeHouse
06-06-2012, 09:57 AM
Couldn't agree with Alex and E Hubbs more.

If you want to be a cardio queen save it for after your 600. Spend all summer and fall doing cardio to your heart's content.

If you really feel the need to do more, just get on the treadmill everyday. Don't worry about the heart rate. Get some work done and get the blood flowing.

I would get through the 600 and then do 2 days of HIIT and 2-4 days of steady state per week. Once you get acclimated to it you can keep it going through your next meet.