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View Full Version : Is there a problem with lifting aids (gloves, pads, etc...)



DravenCarey
06-23-2012, 06:21 AM
As I've been reading a lot of the posts on the website, I've noticed that a good deal of people shun the use of stuff like gloves and other accessories to make the lifting a little easier. Why is that? Is it just because a majority of those people who shun it come from a competitive lifting background where those accessories aren't allowed? Also, for someone who is only lifting for the purpose of bettering him/herself in a sport (where something like building the necessary grip strength for a big deadlift isn't necessarily needed) is there any negative side effects to using them. The one's I'm most concerned with are lifting gloves and the padding people may use when doing squats to make it a bit more comfortable. Thanks for the feedback.

justiNCSU
06-23-2012, 07:23 AM
The only people ive ever seen use gloves are skinny little bastards. And the only people ive ever seen use the pussy pad either squat 135 or have a 3 inch range of motion. Do you want to end up like these people?

Jonathan E
06-23-2012, 07:31 AM
The only people ive ever seen use gloves are skinny little bastards. And the only people ive ever seen use the pussy pad either squat 135 or have a 3 inch range of motion. Do you want to end up like these people?

Tell that to Ronnie Coleman.

Honestly if the gloves make a difference and you like it, who cares.

Murderous
06-23-2012, 10:58 AM
Gloves help to limit the growth of calluses, but if you forget to take them with you to the gym the skin where the callus will form will hurt a lot. If you're used to lifting without gloves it won't hurt but you will feel a minor feeling of discomfort if you are squeezing onto the bar (when bench pressing.) Some people use them for hygiene purposes, but if hygiene is the intended use I would get the gloves that covers the fingers too and not just the palm.

Cards
06-23-2012, 11:34 AM
I love my calluses and so does the GF! Wouldn't trade them for soft hands, ever.

Bako Lifter
06-23-2012, 11:53 AM
There's nothing wrong with sitting down every time you pee either.

Travis Bell
06-23-2012, 11:54 AM
Gloves are stupid.

DravenCarey
06-23-2012, 01:54 PM
Gloves are stupid.


There's nothing wrong with sitting down every time you pee either.


The only people ive ever seen use gloves are skinny little bastards. And the only people ive ever seen use the pussy pad either squat 135 or have a 3 inch range of motion. Do you want to end up like these people?

Yea, definitely saw these coming. Anyone who cares to give a reasonable (unbiased) suggestion out there? I don't really care much about forming my calluses so that's not an issue for me. I'm mostly looking for whether or not there is a negative repurcussion to using them (other than getting made fun of online). Particularly the squat pad, with heavy enough weight it can be quite uncomfortable and I wouldn't want that to be what holds me back from using higher weight. Any constructive thoughts are welcome, any and all bashing can please be taken elsewhere.

justiNCSU
06-23-2012, 02:11 PM
If you want gloves purely for grip i dont have a problem with that, some people have dry or wet hands. I just think the gloves with padding in them are stupid and i personally wouldnt want antyhing between my hands and the bar.
Im going to guess that your new to the squatting. It is uncomfortable at first but you will get used to holding the weight on your back. And once you start to get some nice weight on the bar i would be concerned about having 2 inches of padding between my shoulders and the bar.
TLDR: wear gloves if you want, dont use the squat pad.

cphafner
06-23-2012, 02:14 PM
Yea, definitely saw these coming. Anyone who cares to give a reasonable (unbiased) suggestion out there? I don't really care much about forming my calluses so that's not an issue for me. I'm mostly looking for whether or not there is a negative repurcussion to using them (other than getting made fun of online). Particularly the squat pad, with heavy enough weight it can be quite uncomfortable and I wouldn't want that to be what holds me back from using higher weight. Any constructive thoughts are welcome, any and all bashing can please be taken elsewhere.

Travis gave you his opinion. He benches 800lbs and is stong as an ox. If he says they are stupid, they are stupid.

Niko_El_Piko
06-23-2012, 02:26 PM
Gloves are stupid.

And the pads for the squats even more!!!!!!! hehe

Bako Lifter
06-23-2012, 02:56 PM
For squatting, it will be uncomfortable and maybe a little painful the first 3-5 sessions. You will get used to it, to the point where it will not hurt at all and you'll wonder why you were asking this question in the first place.


I haven't back squatted in over a year. Last month I was using 135-225 lbs, and it hurt like a bitch. A month later and 315 felt fine.

Murderous
06-23-2012, 04:37 PM
Growing big traps will stop them from hurting. The most I ever squatted was 245 for 5 (before any injuries) and I would forget there was even a barbell on my traps. I would feel the barbell but it didn't hurt

3fingerVic
06-23-2012, 04:49 PM
I occasionally use a Manta Ray to squat. For me it's not for comfort, I feel it's a supplemental exercise. My workout achilles heal is the fact that I have three fingers on my right hand. My thumb and second finger are normal, but the pointer finger only bends at the first knuckle. The hand is fairly strong, but I run into when it comes to heavy pulling exercises such; as dead lifts and bent rows. I use a Sheik strap on that hand. I wish I didn't need it, but could barely workout my back without it.

As far as what other people do, I could care less. If it works for you, go for it. Honestly, when I started weight training, I couldn't afford gloves, belts and pads so I never used them. I wish I would have known about wrist straps when I was a teenager, as my hand held me back a bit in those days.

NITF
06-23-2012, 06:48 PM
Obviously there are some strong opinions on this matter, I have a strong opinion on it too but mine is tempered by a good deal of sympathy with glove wearers...
I used to be afraid of getting calluses; In the past I often thought of myself as more of a lover than I fighter ;) I had always had exceptionally silky smooth, soft skinned hands that women liked (and said so)... when I started really lifting and reading that using them might limit my optimum grip strength I had to choose my priority. I now have some pretty mighty calluses and honestly, i love having them: my hands are strong now, in every way.
oh, and you can maintain calluses pretty well if desired; they can actually be pretty smooth tolerable for those who don't appreciate them.

DontTakeEmOff31
06-23-2012, 07:42 PM
As I've been reading a lot of the posts on the website, I've noticed that a good deal of people shun the use of stuff like gloves and other accessories to make the lifting a little easier. Why is that? Is it just because a majority of those people who shun it come from a competitive lifting background where those accessories aren't allowed? Also, for someone who is only lifting for the purpose of bettering him/herself in a sport (where something like building the necessary grip strength for a big deadlift isn't necessarily needed) is there any negative side effects to using them. The one's I'm most concerned with are lifting gloves and the padding people may use when doing squats to make it a bit more comfortable. Thanks for the feedback.

You lift to get strong, calluses are the mark of hard working man. Why would you not want them? You WILL get stronger using your bare hands. All gloves will do is prevent this, you want your hands to harden up and get strong.

Straps are shunned because they take the grip out of the equation, you should not rely on them. They can be used for specific training (some kind of overload on the muscle where the grip would fail) but if you can't move heavy weight without straps then there is a major problem.

The manta ray or pad is a bad idea because it really only works for light weight. Same as with gloves, man up and put the bar on your back. Making sure you are "comfortable" while squatting shouldn't be a concern, the weight on the bar should be the focus.

RobmoriRB
06-23-2012, 07:47 PM
In my honest opinion, I would not use gloves or hooks. I only use chalk for Dead lifts, an I try not to use a Belt in training so I can build my core for the big-3.

April Mathis
06-23-2012, 08:05 PM
Unless you compete in lifting it does not matter. Lift any way that you enjoy. Obviously if you plan to compete you cannot use any of those on the platform.

mastermonster
06-23-2012, 09:23 PM
Unless you compete in lifting it does not matter. Lift any way that you enjoy. Obviously if you plan to compete you cannot use any of those on the platform.

Pretty much this. When I was all into bodybuilding (several years) I used gloves and straps. I never liked the squat bar pads because it changes the center of gravity for the bar, and I squatted very heavy for a bodybuilder. When my interest finally shifted completely to powerlifting (2002) I dropped the gloves and only use the straps for my heaviest sets of barbell rows, where my grip would wear out before my back strength would. I never use straps on deadlifts for the obvious reason that you can't use them on the platform. If I were training for a strongman meet (where you can use them) I would and did use them for the one SM meet I did do. Like April said, if your training has nothing to do with powerlifting; use what you like and enjoy your training.

DravenCarey
06-23-2012, 09:49 PM
Thanks for all the good feedback. Gives me some pondering to do. I think I'll back off the pad on the squat because I can see how that might be a problem. I think I'll give it a week or two without gloves to see how well I handle it and go off of that. Other oppinions and constructive advice is welcome.

ThomasG
06-23-2012, 10:41 PM
Gloves make it harder to grip because they increase the circumference around the bar. For grip go with chalk. If you don't want calluses go with gloves.

thecityalive
06-24-2012, 01:41 AM
The bar pad puts extra space in between you and the bar which throws the center of gravity off, not allowing you to have optimal posture during the lift. You will feel the need to compensate for the excess on your back, and will probably cause your chest to fall, put the weight on your toes, and throw your weight off. Good luck trying to rely on a rolling foam pad to stay still on your back...especially if you want to low bar squat. Might as well put ball bearings on your back.

As for gloves +1 for increasing bar circumference.

JK1
06-24-2012, 09:25 PM
This is how I see it:

gloves? Why? I work the speed bag and heavy bags bare knuckled or with wraps, no gloves. WhY? Thats how I was taught to do it when I was in the ring more. I grew up on a farm where you used your hands to work. Today, I unloaded a trailer of hay--- bare handed. Why? because it was 90+ degrees outsside and sweatting in leather gloves just makes my bad grip worse. Its the same thing in the gym. Most commercial gyms have absolute crap bars. I just don't understand how people can grab a bar with gloves on. I sure can't.

The "pussy pad"-- is NOT a good idea. It offsets the bar and can actually set you up to get hurt if you are actually trying to squat right. And lets face it, you really load the bar up, say a decent weight of 700, 800 lbs, how much is that thin foam doing? You say the bar hurts? then what are you doing wrong with your setup? If it hurts you aren't getting under the bar correctly. Something else is wrong that a pad won't fix.

Straps? There is a place for lifting straps, even in powerlifting or other "hardcore training". The thing is when and where to use them appropriately. If you use them or every set, you are making a mistake. If you use them to overload at the end after your grip has failed.. then I think you are using them appropriately.

Other lifting aids.. like a hephrene back brace or knee sleeves or something like that? My question is what is your injury? Do you have a medical reason to use them? If not, then don't.

theBarzeen
06-25-2012, 10:52 PM
I'm cracking up here at the guys talking about " well if you lift a decent amount of weight then...."

What are the chances that a 700 pound squatter or 500 pound bencher is asking this question?

I'd say that if you have a reason to protect your hands then wear gloves.... if you are a chiropractor, masseuse, surgeon, etc... and need soft hands then go for it.... I know a guy who has crazy dry skin on his hands and will bleed from his hands cracking if he chalks up and uses a bar with good knurling..... go on and use gloves if you need them. If you don't need them it's like using a wheel chair because walking is harder.....

The squat pad is only an issue because your back hasn't grown enough to give you a comfortable place to rest the bar.... even when I was small ( I started lifting at 17 years old.... 165 lbs and 6'5".... I was a bean pole) I always felt like the pad would throw off the balance of the bar.... if it's that bad wrap a towel around the bar or wear a sweatshirt....


Either way, don't get all snippy about the responses you've gotten.... calling people's opinions biased, like they stand to profit somehow from your not wearing gloves.... you didn't post on bodybuilding.com or some other sissy gym rat forum..... you posted this on a powerlifting forum. The only goal of most guys on here is to be as big and strong as possible ESPECIALLY for competition. So yea, you might not get a sympathy bro on here telling you that you're still hardcore using a pad to squat, but you will get the opinions of a lot of guys who have put in the work and become much, much stronger than you are right now.... if that's your goal, then follow it.

DravenCarey
06-26-2012, 01:07 AM
Thanks for all the positive feedback everyone, much appreciated.

Brian C
06-27-2012, 09:03 AM
I have dry skin on my fingers and bleed from chalk use too, but will never wear gloves.
Learn how to set up your squat properly before you do so. If it hurts, your not set up tight enough.

kaspersky
07-04-2012, 10:10 PM
I love my calluses and so does the GF! Wouldn't trade them for soft hands, ever.