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View Full Version : What Doesn't Work? (open ended question)



NITF
07-14-2012, 02:44 AM
We spend a lot of time here trying to find and understand the best ways to train. Sometimes, the best way to understand something is to examine its opposite. I think the same is true with training; to understand what truly works, it can be helpful to point out what does not. My fundamental question to anyone is this: What have you found doesn't work in training? As I eluded to, I think exploring this side of things can enhance ones concept of what is actually worthwhile... it is also nice to have an idea of what to avoid. This is pretty open ended and could be anything from a certain routine, diet... anything... just looking for some useful insights...

oh, and don't be the smart ass that posts something like "what doesn't work: sitting on my lazy-boy and eating pancakes all day - still not stronger :( ."... or do, but at least make sure its funny....

JasonLift
07-14-2012, 09:55 AM
Avoiding the things that we suck at. I know its not original but I did that for years. Chose lifts and accessory work that I was good at rather than doing something I sucked at and having to put my ego in check and drop the weights. Once I finally got over that mindset I found that it didn't take long for me to dramatically improve some of those lifts I sucked at by starting small and hammering down on the form.

KJDANEXT0
07-14-2012, 02:06 PM
Avoiding the things that we suck at. I know its not original but I did that for years. Chose lifts and accessory work that I was good at rather than doing something I sucked at and having to put my ego in check and drop the weights. Once I finally got over that mindset I found that it didn't take long for me to dramatically improve some of those lifts I sucked at by starting small and hammering down on the form.

I think this is really good info right here. I'm not made for the squat but no longer will I use that as an excuse. I squatted the other day after 3 weeks of no squatting and could lift more than before. I'm now excited to want to squat again.

NITF
07-14-2012, 07:27 PM
Avoiding the things that we suck at. I know its not original but I did that for years. Chose lifts and accessory work that I was good at rather than doing something I sucked at and having to put my ego in check and drop the weights. Once I finally got over that mindset I found that it didn't take long for me to dramatically improve some of those lifts I sucked at by starting small and hammering down on the form.

That's a good one. I was just thinking about some of my lagging lifts the other day and how that will play into my training.... This just reminded me to guard against the natural bias to focus on what I am good at....

April Mathis
07-14-2012, 11:20 PM
Training too heavy for too many weeks in a row without some lighter or off days. The longer you train for and stronger you get, the more recovery time you need in between real heavy days and less weeks in a row you can go heavy.

There is also another side to spending more time and effort on things you are good at. If there are two lifts you are better at and one not so much, a lot of times it makes more sense to spend more effort on the two you are good at, as you will likely increase the weight faster on those and it will lead to a bigger total. So you should spend some time on things you are not good at but not at the expense of time and effort on the things you are.

NITF
07-15-2012, 12:38 AM
Training too heavy for too many weeks in a row without some lighter or off days. The longer you train for and stronger you get, the more recovery time you need in between real heavy days and less weeks in a row you can go heavy.
Yeah... always tough to back off... any general tips on how to know when you should?


There is also another side to spending more time and effort on things you are good at. If there are two lifts you are better at and one not so much, a lot of times it makes more sense to spend more effort on the two you are good at, as you will likely increase the weight faster on those and it will lead to a bigger total. So you should spend some time on things you are not good at but not at the expense of time and effort on the things you are.

Thanks for adding this caveat... makes sense if you are competing for sure; do you think it is equally valid if your not competing?


Thanks for the feedback by the way! Man do I love this forum and the fact that world record holders hang out here!

April Mathis
07-15-2012, 08:15 PM
Thanks for the feedback by the way! Man do I love this forum and the fact that world record holders hang out here!

How you know when to back off is everything feels heavier and not as strong, more soreness for longer than usual, joint pain more than usual, lack of energy, stuff like that.

Yes I think the other point is still valid if you don't compete, although if you don't compete just have fun with whatever you like to do. There's no pressure to perform on every lift at once, so you can take more time working on some things then others, and just do what you enjoy.

RhodeHouse
07-16-2012, 05:46 AM
Program hopping and goal hopping.

Guys who jump from program to program never really make any real progress and never learn how to train.

Same goes for goals. Too many guys pick a goal and then ditch it before they reach it because tyhey can't accept the consequences of what that goal may bring. ie: gaining weight and your gut getting bigger. It's gonna happen. Deal with it.