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SmooshJohnson
08-24-2012, 08:45 PM
Curious about peoples thoughts on this. Is it possible to gain significant strength without gaining a ton of weight?

I will be breaking my original goals soon at about 6'1 200lbs bodyweight. I would like to stay about 200lbs, but, of course, continue with strength gains.

DontTakeEmOff31
08-24-2012, 09:23 PM
Yes, you can continue to gain strength without getting bigger, there is an upper bound to how much strength you can gain without gaining more weight though.

If you are not focused on getting huge but want to train strength you should at least be at a reasonable weight for your height, my friends who are 6'1 6'2 who don't lift at all are 185 and pretty damn skinny. 220 would be a much more natural weight for strength training at your height, and even then thats kind of small.

But for your original question, you can still keep making gains at your current weight if you are not looking to get bigger, I know a few people around your height and weight who bench 315 and pull 495.

SmooshJohnson
08-25-2012, 07:12 AM
Yes, you can continue to gain strength without getting bigger, there is an upper bound to how much strength you can gain without gaining more weight though.

If you are not focused on getting huge but want to train strength you should at least be at a reasonable weight for your height, my friends who are 6'1 6'2 who don't lift at all are 185 and pretty damn skinny. 220 would be a much more natural weight for strength training at your height, and even then thats kind of small.

But for your original question, you can still keep making gains at your current weight if you are not looking to get bigger, I know a few people around your height and weight who bench 315 and pull 495.

Cool, thanks. I would definitly like to put on weight, because 200lbs is really just 6'1 filled out so to speak..that is, I don't think I'm skinny, but I'm not really big either. I joined the Army though and they require me to be below a certain weight. I heard that if you stay below a certain BF% then it doesn't matter how much you weight though, which I will have to look in to

joey54
08-25-2012, 09:34 AM
You should be able to get a lot stronger at your current size without gaining much weight at all. Make sure you eat enough to recover and that is about it. How you figure that out is easier said then done, but don't sweat the small stuff.

Bruiser
08-25-2012, 09:47 AM
Curious about peoples thoughts on this. Is it possible to gain significant strength without gaining a ton of weight?

I will be breaking my original goals soon at about 6'1 200lbs bodyweight. I would like to stay about 200lbs, but, of course, continue with strength gains.

You can easily get a lot stronger without gaining weight. Just make sure you're eating enough to recover but keep an eye on that scale once a week.


You should be able to get a lot stronger at your current size without gaining much weight at all. Make sure you eat enough to recover and that is about it. How you figure that out is easier said then done, but don't sweat the small stuff.

Well said! Lol. If he figures out the magic trick that is "eating to recover without changing weight" I'll pay him! I'm in the same boat and have to really watch my diet.

SmooshJohnson
08-25-2012, 10:52 AM
Thanks for the advice everyone. My guess is that a key (well, an obvious one) to maintaining a certain weight or to bulking up slowly (without a significant gain in BF%) is to eat pretty clean..we'll see how that goes :p

Butcher
08-25-2012, 08:27 PM
I joined the Army though and they require me to be below a certain weight. I heard that if you stay below a certain BF% then it doesn't matter how much you weight though, which I will have to look in to

I got out in 2009 but seriously doubt anything has changed in regards to height and weight standards. You are allowed a maximum (and minimum) bodyweight for your height. If you are overweight you get taped, which is a measurement of the abdomen and neck and one number is divided by the other. If you are within a certain ration you are good, if you are over it you are considered too fat. Buy a neck harness, use it a few times a week and it becomes a minor point. Being overweight isn't bad, failing the tape test is.

SmooshJohnson
08-26-2012, 08:07 AM
I got out in 2009 but seriously doubt anything has changed in regards to height and weight standards. You are allowed a maximum (and minimum) bodyweight for your height. If you are overweight you get taped, which is a measurement of the abdomen and neck and one number is divided by the other. If you are within a certain ration you are good, if you are over it you are considered too fat. Buy a neck harness, use it a few times a week and it becomes a minor point. Being overweight isn't bad, failing the tape test is.

Oh, well..that's exciting..that means I can gain weight afterall..PMed you

Bruiser
08-26-2012, 08:17 AM
I got out in 2009 but seriously doubt anything has changed in regards to height and weight standards. You are allowed a maximum (and minimum) bodyweight for your height. If you are overweight you get taped, which is a measurement of the abdomen and neck and one number is divided by the other. If you are within a certain ration you are good, if you are over it you are considered too fat. Buy a neck harness, use it a few times a week and it becomes a minor point. Being overweight isn't bad, failing the tape test is.

Only thing you gotta watch with training your neck is the possibility of developing sleep apnea. The larger your neck, the more apt you are to develop it. And trust me, sleeping with a mask on is no fun.

Invain
08-26-2012, 08:49 AM
I've put about 200 pounds onto my total from a couple years ago till now, and my weight is exactly the same.

Saverio
08-27-2012, 10:28 AM
Anavar