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View Full Version : Too much Protien..........builder or destructor



nero
06-19-2002, 09:26 AM
Take a look at this page http://my.webmd.com/content/article/1676.50058
Is the stuff that they hve written true?Or is just another sh***y article.Its quite well known that protien plays an important role in building muscle..........then what these people trying to say.They gotta have some good reasons to say what they are saying.

WannaBeStrong
06-19-2002, 09:30 AM
Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

EasyGino
06-19-2002, 10:06 AM
.38g per 1lb of bodyweight? if I ate that little protein, i'd go nuts..

Fudomyo
06-19-2002, 10:08 AM
This is retarded.

"it may put your other bodily systems under stress."
That's a big maybe.

"Protein is also a building block for our muscles, bones, cartilage, skin, hair, and blood. Protein-rich foods include meat, cheese, milk, fish, and eggs. For vegetarians, protein can be found in soy products such as tofu as well as in combinations of foods, such as rice or corn with beans."

Huh, sounds like it might be useful.


Studies on geriatric patients and genetically altered rats (at least half of the referenced articles out there) do not apply to you.

Intense exercise will produce powerful homonal responses in the body. If there is no protein around, this does nada for you.

Don't get me wrong, if you don't eat any carbs, you will just make them from your protein stores. You don't want that either.

Fudo

Tiare
06-19-2002, 10:59 AM
Yes, it's absolutely true and false.

The article points out that if you don't increase your exercise or calories etc etc then increasing your protein won't help you. no s**t. It looks like it's based on the concept that you want to keep your body just like it is, and I think it's probably correct that if you don't want to add any muscle, increasing protein won't help.

Conversely, the supplement companies have way over exaggerated how much protein you need so they can sell more supplements. 1gm/pound of body weight is probably way high for what you need as well as what you can actually break down into base amino's.

gettinjackT
06-19-2002, 04:08 PM
It also depends on how much of that bodyweight is muscle...protein is needed to maintain muscle mass...If you're 300 lbs w/ 25% BF, you don't need 300g of protein a day to maintain your muscle mass....but if you're 300 lbs w/ 5% BF, 300g a day or close to it may definately be needed to maintain that...

Saint Patrick
06-19-2002, 11:59 PM
Originally posted by gettinjackT
It also depends on how much of that bodyweight is muscle...protein is needed to maintain muscle mass...If you're 300 lbs w/ 25% BF, you don't need 300g of protein a day to maintain your muscle mass....but if you're 300 lbs w/ 5% BF, 300g a day or close to it may definately be needed to maintain that...

Amen.

SweetP
06-20-2002, 07:15 AM
Too much protein is very hard on your kidneys. It isn't some miracle supplement, and used in excess amounts it has adverse affects on your body. It can be abused, just like anything else.
Y'all are just in denial because you're dependent upon it.

equinox10
06-20-2002, 06:21 PM
I definetly agree that the supplement companies make us believe that we need way more protein than we really do. I mean 2g of protein per pound of body weight sounds like way too much to me. Granted, if you weigh something like 225 lbs. with 7 or 8% bodyfat, you might need that much to maintain muscle, but I think even that is questionable. I could never understand those guys who ingest something like three protein shakes a day. That's almost 150 g of protein (not including the solid meals also eaten throughout the day). Anything in excess to that extent CANNOT be healthy, regardless of what supplement studies or scientific research says.

-Justin

Manveet
06-20-2002, 06:49 PM
Protein does not really have any adverse effects to the kidneys. The Kidneys main function for the body is to excrete wastes, not synthesize protein. If protein was going to have a negative effect on any organ, it would be the liver.

SweetP
06-20-2002, 07:35 PM
Actually it can affect the kidneys. High Protein diets can lead to excessive amounts of ketones and urea. The kidney may eventually have problems removing the excess ketones and urea from the blood, and as a result an increase in blood acidity. So, that is an invitation for even more health problems.

Fudomyo
06-20-2002, 07:40 PM
Huh? Ketones are only produced when you have no carbohydrates to metabolize fats. IE, the zero carb diet. Sure you probably have a high protein diet at that point.

What'd I miss?

SweetP
06-20-2002, 07:49 PM
Originally posted by Fudomyo
Ketones are only produced when you have no carbohydrates to metabolize fats.

No, ketones are always being produced. EXCESS ketones are produced when on a low carb, no carb diet. However, assuming that one's diet consists mainly of protein..... it is likely that some carbs will be cut. So additional ketones will be produced.

Manveet
06-20-2002, 08:35 PM
But the article wasn't talkin about strictly protein diets.

nero
06-20-2002, 10:50 PM
So whats the final verdict,yes to high protien intake or no?
If protien does not help in building muscle then what does?What about the advice given by many builder to consume large amounts of protiens to gain muscle.If a well BALANCED food intake coupled with a good workout routine is what we need for growth,then why dont all of us see good gains?

equinox10
06-21-2002, 06:26 AM
Originally posted by nero
So whats the final verdict,yes to high protien intake or no?
If protien does not help in building muscle then what does?What about the advice given by many builder to consume large amounts of protiens to gain muscle.If a well BALANCED food intake coupled with a good workout routine is what we need for growth,then why dont all of us see good gains?

This is just my two cents, but I believe that bodybuilders need a much higher protein intake than the average person does. Heck, even the average person needs more protein than is recommended by normal nutritionists. That doesn't mean though that they need to consume 2 or 3 g of protein per pound of bodyweight. That is simply going overboard, and anything that overboard is bound not to work.

Also, it is impossible to say that a good workout routine and good diet will bring good gains. In the broad sense that is true, but there are many other factors that play in, and people are always experimenting to find out what their particular body needs to make good gains. Everyone is different. One type of diet (or routine) that works for someone might not necessarily work for someone else, so its a bit more complicated.

-Justin

Vido
06-21-2002, 12:46 PM
:withstupi

breeze
06-21-2002, 01:10 PM
Originally posted by SweetP


No, ketones are always being produced. EXCESS ketones are produced when on a low carb, no carb diet. However, assuming that one's diet consists mainly of protein..... it is likely that some carbs will be cut. So additional ketones will be produced.

High protein diet have NOT shown to cause kidney damage in individuals with healthy kidneys. However, it does cause some kidney damage in kidneys that are already damaged

smalls
06-21-2002, 02:32 PM
Alright, Where the hell are all your studies that show that more than 150 grams of protein, or ANY amount of protein can cause kidney damage.

I agree that supp companies and some people state numbers that are not necassary, but I have never seen a study or even one person who has had adverse effects from taking in too much protein.

SweetP
06-21-2002, 04:37 PM
http://www.tahfin.org/resources/factsheets/whey.htm
http://www.cptips.com/protein.htm


Neither of these have specific studies, but they do warn about possible kidney damage.

So believe what you want, but it boils down to the simple truth that too much of anything isnt good.

Maki Riddington
06-21-2002, 04:42 PM
Where are the scientific references on these so called dangers Sweet P?
Can you produce them. It is a well known fact that too much of anything is not good for ones body. But how much is too much?
Please see my article on protein on the front page.

Tryska
06-21-2002, 04:44 PM
incidentally, ketonic diets are not high-protein. they are high fat. If you were to eat a high protein diet, with no carbs, you would just be going through extra steps to convert that protein into sugar for burning, not producing ketones.

Maki Riddington
06-21-2002, 04:49 PM
Originally posted by Tryska
incidentally, ketonic diets are not high-protein. they are high fat. If you were to eat a high protein diet, with no carbs, you would just be going through extra steps to convert that protein into sugar for burning, not producing ketones.

*** Go Tryska, go Tryska.......

Tryska
06-21-2002, 04:53 PM
it's my birthday....

SweetP
06-21-2002, 04:54 PM
Originally posted by Tryska
incidentally, ketonic diets are not high-protein. they are high fat.


Incidentally, many high fat foods are also high protein.

Tryska
06-21-2002, 04:59 PM
no they are not.

ice cream, potato chips, and hot dogs are all high-fat....very little protein tho.


most fish, chicken, and turkey, are all high protein, very little fat.

steak can be found with relatively less fat too, depending on the cut, as well as wild game which are comparable to the lean meats stated above, also very low fat.


do you even know what a ketonic diet is comprised of?

it's a ration of 75% fat to 25% protein, with at least 30gs of carbs. if you eat too much protein, just as if you eat too many carbs, you will be bumped out of ketosis.

Maki Riddington
06-21-2002, 05:02 PM
Originally posted by Tryska
no they are not.


steak can be found with relatively less fat too, depending on the cut, as well as wild game which are comparable to the lean meats stated above, also very low fat.




Steak, lean steak has very little fat compared to the amount of protein in it.

Btw, Happy Birthday Tryska.

Tryska
06-21-2002, 05:05 PM
hee hee..it's not really my birthday. ;)

Goin_Big
06-21-2002, 06:49 PM
I kinda agree with the article, I think you only need .5 grams of protein per pound of bodyweight to gain muscle.

I mean I've been losing fat eating 25/50/25, f/c/p, so can someone prove to me that I need more protein? Btw that's based on an approximately 2,000 calorie diet and I'm doing quite well in the strength department too......

Maybe it's just me, but carbs aren't the devil, and protein isn't the key.

Monster Muscle
06-21-2002, 07:26 PM
I just gotta have my protein...and then...:fart: