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View Full Version : Would a degree in health sciences aid me in becoming a strength and conditioning coac



Falcon63
10-27-2012, 02:11 PM
coach?

I ask because I'm currently majoring in Criminal Justice in college and I realized that it is NOT what I want to do with my life. I want to be a S&C coach and possibly open up my own gym later in life. However, the closest major I found in my University is this:

http://www.fairmontstate.edu/schoolofeducation/academic-programs/health-science

Does that sound like the type of degree that would aid me in becoming a S&C coach?

Jonathan E
10-27-2012, 02:14 PM
I know ZARFIT and some others have experience in the field. Try asking them.

ScottYard
10-27-2012, 02:27 PM
Internships and work study type arrangements play a big role in that field as well. Not just the degree. I hope Matt Rhodes chimes in as he works for a University doing that now.

Falcon63
10-27-2012, 02:38 PM
Internships and work study type arrangements play a big role in that field as well. Not just the degree. I hope Matt Rhodes chimes in as he works for a University doing that now.

Well, I know that, I'm hoping to get an internship my junior and senior years. However, I'm just not sure if that degree description is what I'm looking for.

Hopefully it is along the lines of aiding me become a S&C coach because I've already transferred once and I don't want to transfer again, but I DESPERATELY want to change my major. I know it will add two more years to my college expenses, but I don't know where I'd go to learn to become a S&C coach other than college.

If I could become a S&C coach without going to college, that'd be GREAT, since I think college is a waste of time and money, but I wouldn't even know where to get an internship, and colleges usually have connections for that type of stuff.

Butcher
10-27-2012, 02:46 PM
I'm a senior going after an exercise science degree. Based off of my experiance unless you were dead set on working at the collegiate level I wouldn't bother. If I had it to do all over again I would major in human biology, but I am not changing my major when I have so much put into it already. Human biology would give you a much greater understanding of the human body and how it works and responds to different factors. Sure you won't learn about periodization and program basics, but I would bet you wouldn't learn about that with that degree you linked anyways.

The biggest benefit I have gotten out of my education in terms of my own training is my human anatomy and phsyiology classes. I have not modified anything in my own training as a result of what I have learned.

Falcon63
10-27-2012, 03:10 PM
Well, that is the only related major my University offers. It's either that, stay with my current major and waste a bunch of money doing something I don't want to do, or drop-out. I would just drop-out, as I feel college as a whole is a waste of money, but I can't seem to find a job, and without a job, my mother would just kick me out. I've applied to MANY places, MINIMUM WAGE jobs, ALL OF THEM, and still not ONE response from any.

If I could just land even a minimum wage job where I could pay for gas and car insurance, it would be a no-brainer, I'd drop-out immediately.

Further, while I'd accept ANY job at this point, I really want to get a job doing something I enjoy, like working at GNC or in a gym or something. But like I said, while I have experience lifting and using supplements and dieting, I don't actually know the science behind it, and I want to, but I think the only way to learn about that stuff is in college (I could search online, but I don't know what to search for).

Travis Bell
10-27-2012, 03:32 PM
Transfer. That degree isn't really going to help you much.

I dropped my exercise science degree in my sophomore year and picked up psychology instead. Best decision I could have made. The psychology stuff really helped me learn how to communicate with the plethora of personalities you come in contact with in athletics.

I have no interest in working for a college so I didn't worry about all the certifications that went along with that.

After I dropped my exercise science, I began working closely with Louie Simmons and that's where I learned everything that I now use with athletes.

If you're going to spend the money on a degree, get one that is worth the time. Only other one I'd have considered was athletic training because of all the rehab and therapy stuff I do on highschool athletes but that stuff can be picked up pretty easily as well.

Falcon63
10-27-2012, 03:41 PM
Colleges around me don't have exercise science degrees either. I've thought about AT, but what I REALLY want to do is be a strength and conditioning coach. I'd honestly rather do it WITHOUT wasting money on college, as I believe college is just a bullshit marketing scheme used to entrap people in debt, however, I wouldn't know where/how to learn the knowledge needed to be a S&C coach, and I wouldn't know how to get a job without having a degree.

But, I DO know that you can become NSCA certified by taking an online exam. Is it really that easy? If I gain the knowledge, and pass the exam, is that all I really need to do? I just want to do something I love and not be some mindless drone or robot.

I don't want to be part of the industrial complex that conforms to society's standards. I want to do what I WANT TO DO!

Alex.V
10-27-2012, 03:46 PM
The NSCA CSCS exam is an easy one, and most other types of coaching certifications (including USAT, USATF, etc.) are even easier.

I would still get a degree in SOMETHING, ANYTHING, to have a backup. Even something tangentially related (if you can find anything in the sciences, it'll certainly help you read and interpret a lot of the "science" in the field you'll be exposed to) would be of assistance, but for many folks who might be hiring, showing a college degree is sort of a bare minimum.

I never wanted to work at the collegiate level either, so I opened my own company. Working out pretty well so far. :) I would say if you REALLY want to take it to the next level, get your college degree, start coaching, then think about a master's.

Falcon63
10-27-2012, 03:54 PM
But, the thing is, my family is not rich. In fact, we BARELY survive BECAUSE we have to pay my tuition. It is too expensive, and we're constantly having to take out loans that I DON'T want to take, because I realize that I will basically have to pay back TWICE as much as I borrow, and I do not want be in debt for 10-15 years.

It is not as bad now, but the college I went to my freshman year was 40k/year, so I already have MASSIVE student loans!

I feel as though I'm doing a disservice to myself by continuing going to college, as I am ultimately just wasting time and money that I will never get back, but realistically, like you said, you need a college degree in this economy.

However, college is just something I do not want to do for any reasons outlined in the thread. However, if I don't go and can't find a job quick enough, I'll be kicked out.

EDIT: Only good thing about college is obviously meeting new people and making friends (and girlfriends). That's honestly the only thing besides being kicked out that I'd worry about. College is THE best place to make friends and connections, and that is probably the only reasons I haven't dropped out yet.

ScottYard
10-27-2012, 04:39 PM
Well, I know that, I'm hoping to get an internship my junior and senior years. However, I'm just not sure if that degree description is what I'm looking for.

Hopefully it is along the lines of aiding me become a S&C coach because I've already transferred once and I don't want to transfer again, but I DESPERATELY want to change my major. I know it will add two more years to my college expenses, but I don't know where I'd go to learn to become a S&C coach other than college.

If I could become a S&C coach without going to college, that'd be GREAT, since I think college is a waste of time and money, but I wouldn't even know where to get an internship, and colleges usually have connections for that type of stuff.

College most certainly isnt a waste of time. I used to think like that way my self. Now that I have been out of school for 8 years I know i wrong I was. Dont put the carriage before the horse.

ScottYard
10-27-2012, 04:42 PM
But, the thing is, my family is not rich. In fact, we BARELY survive BECAUSE we have to pay my tuition. It is too expensive, and we're constantly having to take out loans that I DON'T want to take, because I realize that I will basically have to pay back TWICE as much as I borrow, and I do not want be in debt for 10-15 years.

It is not as bad now, but the college I went to my freshman year was 40k/year, so I already have MASSIVE student loans!

I feel as though I'm doing a disservice to myself by continuing going to college, as I am ultimately just wasting time and money that I will never get back, but realistically, like you said, you need a college degree in this economy.

However, college is just something I do not want to do for any reasons outlined in the thread. However, if I don't go and can't find a job quick enough, I'll be kicked out.

EDIT: Only good thing about college is obviously meeting new people and making friends (and girlfriends). That's honestly the only thing besides being kicked out that I'd worry about. College is THE best place to make friends and connections, and that is probably the only reasons I haven't dropped out yet.

I think you have a shitty attitude towards school and you should change that fast. You wont get too far if you dont. Not a slam towards you. Just some advice.

Falcon63
10-27-2012, 04:54 PM
College most certainly isnt a waste of time. I used to think like that way my self. Now that I have been out of school for 8 years I know i wrong I was. Dont put the carriage before the horse.


I think you have a shitty attitude towards school and you should change that fast. You wont get too far if you dont. Not a slam towards you. Just some advice.
Well, this isn't really part of the question, I respectfully disagree. I believe college is a waste of time. Not because I'm some stupid kid who slacks off and wants to go and smoke weed all day (I have a good GPA, don't drink, don't smoke/do drugs), but because I believe that I am not getting any return on my investment. I'm spending all this money on tuition and books and taking out student loans that will take me YEARS to pay back, and I haven't learned A SINGLE THING. Nothing anyone says will change my mind on this. I learn new things EVERY SINGLE DAY that are actually, you know, applicable to life just by reading books, articles, experiencing things, etc. The ONLY thing I have ever learned in college that may actually help me in my future endeavors is what diminishing returns on investments are. Outside of that, LITERALLY NOTHING.

I'm sick of people thinking that you MUST go to school, like you're stupid if you don't. I know MANY very intelligent people that never even stepped foot on a college campus. Now, I'll probably finish it off and get my Associate's, as I'm already 3 semesters in, but I don't feel it is NEEDED to get it.

I dunno, I just don't buy into that whole BS that you HAVE to go to college or you'll be some bum. I've gained MUCH more knowledge on my own than I ever have in school. Knowledge that is more applicable to real life and concepts that I am actually interested in.

Anyways, that wasn't my question, whether college is a waste of time or not. I KNOW it is for me.

Alex.V
10-28-2012, 06:51 AM
You're right, what do we know. It's not like we work in the field you want to be in and realize the value of our degrees.

Barbaccio
10-28-2012, 07:01 AM
Falcon63 - I have a question and I don't like college.
Forum - Repsectful and thoughtful response.
Falcon63 - I don't like your response and here are 63 excuses why I can't do what you said & more about why I hate college.
Forum - More respectful responses.
Falcon63 - More excuses & more hate about college.
Forum - We give up.

Falcon63
10-28-2012, 07:29 AM
You're right, what do we know. It's not like we work in the field you want to be in and realize the value of our degrees.


Falcon63 - I have a question and I don't like college.
Forum - Repsectful and thoughtful response.
Falcon63 - I don't like your response and here are 63 excuses why I can't do what you said & more about why I hate college.
Forum - More respectful responses.
Falcon63 - More excuses & more hate about college.
Forum - We give up.

Look, I understand where you guys are coming from, I'm just saying that, for ME, college is a waste of time and money. But again, this wasn't even part of the question. Believe me, I've gotten countless lectures on the topic, but honestly, I don't make my decisions based on whether people will approve of them or not, I make them because I want to make them. You guys pointed out something, I respectfully disagreed. What I said is my personal opinion. Why can't that just be the end of it?

EDIT: @Alex The thing is, at my college, there IS no program that would be applicable to my field. A college degree would just be a little piece of paper that said "yup, he slept in class less than some kids and he showed up for 4 years". The only motivation I have to get a college degree is that I need one to become NSCA-CSCS certified, I enjoy the friends I've made and don't want to miss out on making more, and I play college football. Outside of that, I'm wasting my money, as I've learned ten times the amount of knowledge on my own than I ever have in college.

Barbaccio
10-28-2012, 07:54 AM
We're not focusing on whether you like college or not. We're focusing on the fact that these guys give you advice, they are in the field you want to be in, and you have an excuse every time not being able to do what they're telling you. So what exactly are you looking for? Validation that it's awesome to go and quit school? No problem. Go quit. It's awesome. It's not for you. Quit and venture out on your own. Have a blast. But if you want to do what you're saying you want to do, these guys are telling you that you can't quit. So now it's up to you. Figure it out on your own.

gaz90
10-28-2012, 08:07 AM
40k per year?! you were robbed mate.

Tom Mutaffis
10-28-2012, 08:56 AM
If you have already been in college for a couple of years is there any way that you could transfer those credits towards an associates degree? Even something general like Business Administration would be beneficial in the long run and give you a head start if you decided to re-pursue the bachelors down the road.

Certifications will be helpful if you want to get into personal training and/or eventually becoming a strength coach - I would look into the CSCS and also possibly just pick up a basic PT cert like the ACE.

What have you been doing to apply for jobs? If you are sending online applications or simply posted up on a job board you likely will not have great results. It could be beneficial to look at your personal network (Facebook, etc.) to try to find someone who can help you, get a good resume put together, and reach out to some staffing companies to see if maybe you can land a temporary position to gain some experience. It is typically a lot easier to find a job when you are already employed and have some sort of specific skill set, or at least some competitive knowledge that might make you valuable to another company.

I have worked in staffing for 8 years and would be happy to help with your resume (for free) if you would like. Just send me a PM on here.

Falcon63
10-28-2012, 11:52 AM
You're right, what do we know. It's not like we work in the field you want to be in and realize the value of our degrees.


If you have already been in college for a couple of years is there any way that you could transfer those credits towards an associates degree? Even something general like Business Administration would be beneficial in the long run and give you a head start if you decided to re-pursue the bachelors down the road.

Certifications will be helpful if you want to get into personal training and/or eventually becoming a strength coach - I would look into the CSCS and also possibly just pick up a basic PT cert like the ACE.

What have you been doing to apply for jobs? If you are sending online applications or simply posted up on a job board you likely will not have great results. It could be beneficial to look at your personal network (Facebook, etc.) to try to find someone who can help you, get a good resume put together, and reach out to some staffing companies to see if maybe you can land a temporary position to gain some experience. It is typically a lot easier to find a job when you are already employed and have some sort of specific skill set, or at least some competitive knowledge that might make you valuable to another company.

I have worked in staffing for 8 years and would be happy to help with your resume (for free) if you would like. Just send me a PM on here.

Yeah, I already SHOULD have my Associate's, but some dumbass at my University decided to break the credits up. Half towards my Associate's, half towards my Bachelor's, and they won't fix it. And yes, I have been thinking that I should stay in college. While I feel it is a waste of time based on what I actually learn, I want to be CSCS certified, and obviously I need my Bachelor's for that. As for applying, yes, I've just been applying online honestly. I would be interested in a resume, but honestly, I don't really have anything that is resume-worthy. It would probably be a waste of time, especially since I'm applying for minimum wage jobs that don't even require a HS diploma.

I wish it was easy and I could just find a job at like GNC or something :/

RhodeHouse
10-29-2012, 12:42 PM
I have a degree in History and Pshycology, so it doesn't matter all that much. What helped me is my experience as a collegiate and professional athlete, coupled with my lifting career.

I will say this, a degree in Exercise Science, Exercise Physiology, Kinesiology etc... is much better than what I have. Again, my experience as an athlete and coach helps me out a ton.

I'm not trying to dissuade you, but here's reality. In my office there are 5 strength coaches. We're 38, 37, 31, 27 and 23 (GA) years old. This is what it's like all across the country. there aren't many people retiring in the next few years, so jobs are a bitch to come by.

The other thing that helps me a ton is my stature. It looks like I lift weights. I'm big and I'm stronger than every one of the athletes here. You don't have to be the strongest at all, but it certainly helps to be big and in shape. You'd be amazed at how many 150lbs kids come through here thinking they want to be strength coaches who have never played sports before, or at the very least, it was high school sports. They don't "really" lift. Just because you train and have read books doesn't mean you know your stuff. There's a whole aspect of commanding a room and understanding how to program for real life, not what the book says. For the record, "The Book" doesn't know shit. So, a lot of real world common sense is necessary. On top of that, understanding how to deal with different athletes, teams, coaches, etc... Programming and training is probably about 20% of what you actually do as a strength coach.

Sorry about the rant. but, that's the truth behind it. It's a very tough field to get into. Jobs that open up are almost always filled before they've even been posted. Conor had his job "open up" and actually had to interview people for his job that he had already gotten 6 months earlier. Basically, there was an interview process for absolutely no reason. but, that's how it works.

Very tough field to get into. It's all about who you know in the field. Knowing college football coaches helps, too. Good luck and stay after it if it's really something you want to do.

chris mason
10-29-2012, 01:05 PM
Why don't you contact some collegiate and pro teams and ask what they look for when considering someone for the position?

Butcher
10-29-2012, 04:33 PM
Being a certified dietician is another route into the collegiate scene. NCAA regs have limited how many people can be on an S&C staff, I believe it is for football only. They can work around it by hiring dieticians and have them doing the S&C job. Get a dietetics degree and whatever certification/licensing that goes with it, CSCS cert and ideally experiance as a S&C coach and you have an advantage over a lot of others.

Falcon63
10-29-2012, 04:35 PM
^I don't really have a great choice for degrees. I can't get a degree in that or exercise science.

Barbaccio
10-29-2012, 08:14 PM
Falcon can't do anything. He only comes here to vent and all your attempts at advice will be rebutted. You can try, but the guy has an answer for anything. One of those people you don't ever let in your life because they are a complete downer every time you talk to them.

Judas
10-30-2012, 04:42 AM
Falcon can't do anything. He only comes here to vent and all your attempts at advice will be rebutted. You can try, but the guy has an answer for anything. One of those people you don't ever let in your life because they are a complete downer every time you talk to them.

But Tone... we must help him. And after we're done with that... we'll help you with your depression. Wait yer turn.


Falcon. I'll go against the grain here... and just tell you to quit college. I for one am not in the 'must go to college' camp. Hell... i'm not even fully convinced you have to finish high-school. Its obviously not getting you far. You obviously dont believe in it, which is probably why its not getting you far. Its beating you and your family up financially. Seriously, if your heads not in it... screw it.

You also dont need a degree to become a famous S&C coach. No one will ever convince me otherwise.

Heh... that said... heres the kicker... To get good work without the usual accreditation route, you need to be GOOD. Really... all you need is to be able to PROVE that you can improve athletes, without breaking them. Sounds easy. Hell, it is easy. But there are 10000's ov people out there that can do that. You need to be better than them. Wanna get the good jobs without doing the (official) work? PROVE you can do the job better than those who did go that route. If i had a team or star athlete that needed the coaching i'd hire the best person for the job. If the top coach in the land was a grade-1 dropout from lower Elbonia then thats fine by me.

I've been turning down this kind ov work for years now, and i have no letters after my name. Word gets out when you are good at what you do. It gets out even quicker and goes further when you are out there DOING it, looking it, living it (as someone above said), and making client after client happy as hell with results. Just like trying to become world-elite at a strength sport... it wont happen quickly and it sure as hell wont happen without doing more work than EVERYONE else around you, and not just more work, but smarter work. And just like trying to become elite... if you're looking for a quicker way then it was probably never meant to be.


There. Thats the 'no college' road laid right out for you.

RhodeHouse
10-31-2012, 05:10 AM
Yeah, the no college road is fucking retarded.

Slothish
10-31-2012, 05:15 AM
Falcon,

Finish your degree. A degree (even one that is not related to your field) shows people that you are committed to finishing things you start, a degree is also helpful should you find that the world of training and performance enhancement is not a good fit for you long term (the average person changes careers multiple times in their work life), a degree in anything allows you the opportunity to at least compete with other folks in the job market.
For training/S&C jobs a health sciences degree does sound like a better fit than criminal justice, it also probably provides the pre-requisites for advanced degrees in Exercise Science/Kinesiology (should you choose to go that route) whether they be in person or on-line programs.
Having a formal education is almost always a plus, finding internships is equally important (probably more in the long run, since a good internship may lead to that first entry level job), but remember in a competitive market (and S&C is competitive) with everything being equal, the guy with more letters after his name has the advantage.

Judas
10-31-2012, 05:34 AM
Yeah, the no college road is fucking retarded.

Well... it is most definitely not for everyone.

Falcon63
10-31-2012, 07:45 AM
Yeah, the no college road is fucking retarded.
See, I just don't buy that. In my opinion, it is very ignorant to think that someone is either uneducated or unqualified because they didn't attend college. The only people that I believe are "fucking retarded" are the ones who feel that you NEED to go to college, as if it is some requirement. As I said before, realistically, it's just a few letters after your name, nothing more.

Alex.V
10-31-2012, 07:53 AM
See, I just don't buy that. In my opinion, it is very ignorant to think that someone is either uneducated or unqualified because they didn't attend college. The only people that I believe are "fucking retarded" are the ones who feel that you NEED to go to college, as if it is some requirement. As I said before, realistically, it's just a few letters after your name, nothing more.

It may be, but I think many folks here (myself included) have been in the position where they've been hiring for a position. I've hired over 50 people for various roles (corporate consulting, health care, service industry, strength and conditioning/personal training), and I've honestly tossed the ones without a college degree to the back of the pile. Not because they aren't necessarily as smart or capable, but because the ones with the degree have already demonstrated at least a basic commitment to their education and self-improvement, and they have more experience in processing information, learning new information, potentially learning new skills, etc.

There's also the point mentioned above- if you decide NOT to go into this field, without a degree, you're hosed.

Nobody's trying to dog on you because we don't like you, man. A lot of folks here just speaking from experience, actually having lived well beyond the point you're at now, possibly having shared your viewpoint when we were your age (fuck I sound old), but realizing now how mistaken we were. Cheers.

MThomas
10-31-2012, 10:04 AM
You know what a college degree tells employers, if nothing else? That you have the dedication and focus to stick with something for 4 years and follow through. You know what dropping out of college and working for GNC shows? Not that.

Also college is not a waste of time. People just waste their time in college. You don't just show up to class, do the assignments you're given and expect to be enlightened. Are you spending any extra free time you have with S&C coaches at your school? Asking them questions until they're sick of you? Do you go to your professors outside of class to engage them in conversations? Do you talk to professors outside of your degree program who might still know useful things? Biology, anatomy, etc.? Do you audit any classes that might be useful, but are not required for you degree. If not, why not?

Falcon63
10-31-2012, 11:05 AM
the ones with the degree have already demonstrated at least a basic commitment to their education and self-improvement

This where my opinion differs. I am EXTREMELY committed to improving myself and furthering my education, which is precisely WHY I want to drop out of college. If I TRULY want to absorb the most information possible that pertains to my particular interests, I'm better off learning on my own.

REALISTICALLY, all a degree shows is that some kid wasted four years of his life getting drunk and partying while doing the bare minimum work and sleeping a little less in class than some other kids, just so their parents wouldn't be mad at them for not going to college.

I just don't understand the stigma or taboo of not going to college. I am probably more educated than 90% of college students. I don't mean to come off arrogant or cocky, but it's true. It's small-minded to believe that someone who does not go to college is automatically less educated or dedicated than someone who did. In fact, I'd RATHER have someone who didn't waste time on college, as it shows they're more fiscally responsible and they understand that they most likely will not get a good return on their investment.

DontTakeEmOff31
10-31-2012, 11:37 AM
REALISTICALLY, all a degree shows is that some kid wasted four years of his life getting drunk and partying while doing the bare minimum work and sleeping a little less in class than some other kids, just so their parents wouldn't be mad at them for not going to college.
.

Nope, that is not what it shows, not even close. You sound like every other kid from our generation, that you are somehow are more knowledgeable, educated and experienced than people who have spent years studying a degree and working in a field.

If you go to college, work hard and get a decent GPA, you'll get a job. If you get by on the bare minimum with a low GPA you most likely wont get a job and learn much, but thats your own fault. Dont equate lazy students with college.

Alex.V
10-31-2012, 11:54 AM
This where my opinion differs.

Not to put too fine a point on it, but the cold hard fact is that the people who may be hiring you don't really care about your opinion- for better or for worse, this is the general mindset out there, and it's here to stay. Just calling it as we see it, not necessarily debating whether or not college is a good choice for everyone.

Falcon63
10-31-2012, 11:57 AM
Nope, that is not what it shows, not even close. You sound like every other kid from our generation, that you are somehow are more knowledgeable, educated and experienced than people who have spent years studying a degree and working in a field.

If you go to college, work hard and get a decent GPA, you'll get a job. If you get by on the bare minimum with a low GPA you most likely wont get a job and learn much, but thats your own fault. Dont equate lazy students with college.

Where your logic fails is at the point in which you assume I am lazy and have a shitty GPA. I have a 3.7 GPA and got a perfect score on the math portion of the SAT.

Travis Bell
10-31-2012, 12:14 PM
Falcon I will admit, your level of arrogance (or is it ignorance?) is pretty impressive for someone with literally no experience in the field, in the face of guys like myself and others who posted in this thread who have many years of successful experience.

You do what you want, it's your life. But don't ask questions you don't honestly want an answer to around here in the future. Just post on your facebook or twitter or what have you if all you want is for people to tell you how totally awesome your idea is and that you'll probably be king of the world in a matter of weeks.

DontTakeEmOff31
10-31-2012, 12:15 PM
I didn't say you were lazy, I said don't equate a lazy college student to what you get out of college. And just because you have a high GPA does not make your point that college is a waste of time any more valid. I was very succesful in college and I've had numerous software engineering internships, and guess what, a degree or pursuit of a degree is required.

As Alex said, for better or for worse if you want to get a job in strength coaching at the collegiate level its very competitive, and you need all qualifications you can get. So when the time comes to apply for some kind of internship or job, your resume can either be at the bottom of the pile, or the top.

Travis Bell
10-31-2012, 12:19 PM
I can tell you this, you will NOT get a decent collegiate level (read d1 or 2) strength and conditioning job without a college degree. Unless you are somehow very much in with the administration or the football coach, get a degree.

Brian Hopper
10-31-2012, 02:34 PM
:lurk:

Goll65
10-31-2012, 08:51 PM
As you said before To get a CSCS you have to have a bachelors degree. I f your spendin 40k a year on college, I understand it is too much and I couldn't afford it either. You could probably get 90% of your degree done on line for way cheaper, the degree might not be as good but you just doing it to qualify for the CSCS. I too have wanted to do this and I fucked off right out of high school and had my fun. Now I'm 31 have a wife and kid and all I could afford was a AA and a nursing degree, so I'm kinda screwed there. My point- do it while you can, it gets tougher later.

Without a degree you could go the personal training route, I'd go through NSCA or NASM, those are two of the most highly regarded ones. I have done this though and PT is 90% sales just so your aware, and my point with that is S&C may also not be what you are envisioning. Good luck.

Goll65
10-31-2012, 08:53 PM
I'm not positive on this so no one go crazy, but I've heard the NCAA will start requiring CSCS in the future for all strength and conditioning programs.

Falcon63
11-01-2012, 06:26 AM
Well, I've actually decided to stay. I actually decided a few days ago, but decided to keep this thread up, haha.

I want to become CSCS certified through the NSCA, so obviously I'll need a degree. But, the real reasons I want to stay are to play football and meet women. Football, I actually have a legitimate shot of transferring to a D1 school (after contemplating quitting last year after injuries!), and college is obviously the best place to meet women.

Barbaccio
11-01-2012, 06:31 AM
I don't believe for a second you're playing D1. I also believe you'll be serving me fries in the near future but while serving them to me, you'll be telling me about how you're the greatest fry guy McDonald's ever had and how you pick up so many women from behind the fryer. At this point no one really cares what you do with yourself Falcon. You've alienated most of the people here that gave you good advice. You're either a terrific troll, or completely blinded to your own ignorance. I tend to believe the latter.

Falcon63
11-01-2012, 06:42 AM
I don't believe for a second you're playing D1. I also believe you'll be serving me fries in the near future but while serving them to me, you'll be telling me about how you're the greatest fry guy McDonald's ever had and how you pick up so many women from behind the fryer. At this point no one really cares what you do with yourself Falcon. You've alienated most of the people here that gave you good advice. You're either a terrific troll, or completely blinded to your own ignorance. I tend to believe the latter.I don't care what you think.

Anyways, all of the people that gave me "good advice" gave me unsolicited advice. My original question had nothing to do with whether I should drop out or not.

Lastly, making pathetic attempts at personal attacks (herp derp "you'll be serving me fries") is weak at best. I don't know where you got the idea that I believe I am more qualified than people who have actually worked in this field, I simply said that I have learned much more on my own than I ever have in college. I really don't give a shit how it comes off though. If you, for some reason, believe I am arrogant and a "know-it-all", then I really don't care, because, whether you believe it or not, I'm not.

Barbaccio
11-01-2012, 06:51 AM
You came on the board and asked a question. Then you got advice. Now it's unsolicited. You make quite alot of sense. I can see why you're not terribly fond of college with logic like that. What's your name? What school are you playing for? What D1 school will we be seeing you at in the near future? You've made a ton of claims. I don't believe any of them and your response to me didn't state any of the info I just asked. If you're not getting good advice, why do you keep returning? If you don't agree with the people here, why do you keep coming back?

RhodeHouse
11-01-2012, 07:38 AM
WOW! Falcon, you are a fuckin' idiot. I hope you're not the future of this country. I'll pray for the Zombie Apocalypse. The good thing is I know you'll never be a collegue in my field.