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TheRealDeal930
03-09-2013, 12:40 PM
I would like to get some opinions on deficit deadlifting as being the best way to develop strength off the floor on a regular deadlift. If I ever fail a lift i will only end up moving it a few inches off the floor and fail there.
Also, I posted this video and was told that my legs lockout before I finish the lift. This is true, but is there any reason to make an effort in correcting this (if it is even wrong in the first place) if it doesn't leave me vulnerable to injury? Which I feel it does not.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRr3pPGXp_4


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRr3pPGXp_4

J L S
03-09-2013, 02:05 PM
deficit deadlifts are great for building the deadlift all over. The extra ROM at the top also builds the lockout and plus you are pulling through a whole range of motion I think its a lot more beneficial than half ROM lifts (rack/pin pulls - not to say they do not have their own place though).

Id like to make an even more obvious suggestion though as to why you feel weaker off the floor. The touch and go reps.(bouncing the weight off the floor between reps) Practice as you play, you have to pull from a dead stop in the meet so do it in training. It will probably be a kick in the balls to begin with and numbers may drop but you will soon surpass them and build that strength off the floor.

Another thing I find beneficial for speed off the floor is ironically speed deadlifts, those and deficit deadlifts are pretty awesome for strength off the floor along with just more deadlifts.

DontTakeEmOff31
03-09-2013, 03:11 PM
Id like to make an even more obvious suggestion though as to why you feel weaker off the floor. The touch and go reps.

This is pretty much it. Breaking the weight is always going to be the hardest part of the movement, so when you do reps and bounce the weight and skip that part you are really only getting practice breaking the floor for 1 rep.

Brian Hopper
03-11-2013, 04:44 AM
Deficit deadlifts are great for building power off the floor and so is speed work. You can also add those two together. Like mentioned already, get away from touch & go reps. Reset each rep, doing this will also help. As far as your legs locking out first, it looks to me like your hips are to low from the start. Your second and third reps looked better because your hips were a little higher and it looked like a one motion pull. This is what I see, maybe someone else sees something different.

DontTakeEmOff31
03-11-2013, 06:41 AM
As far as your legs locking out first, it looks to me like your hips are to low from the start. Your second and third reps looked better because your hips were a little higher and it looked like a one motion pull. This is what I see, maybe someone else sees something different.

Taking another look at the videos I saw this too. Starts really low with hips. You want to pull the weight, not squat it up. Try starting a little higher with the hips and bending the bar before you pull.

BloodandThunder
03-11-2013, 07:42 AM
Strengthen the hamstrings through a variety of means.
I'd bet your DL history has involved alot of touch-and-go reps. Try a few cycles of restarting reps and account for this in your programming.
Watch the hips.

Lastly, besides what Brian said, you may want to try halting pulls. Be honest about these. Break the bar off the ground, hold it for 3-4 seconds low on the shin but stay extremely tight without trying to lock the legs out, then violently pull the bar to lockout. 3-6 sets x 4-6 reps and start light. Focus completely on keeping tight while you pause.

TheRealDeal930
03-12-2013, 02:50 PM
I'd bet your DL history has involved alot of touch-and-go reps. Try a few cycles of restarting reps and account for this in your programming.


That's the way I've always done them. I'm going to start training with dead stop reps.

TheRealDeal930
03-12-2013, 02:53 PM
Taking another look at the videos I saw this too. Starts really low with hips. You want to pull the weight, not squat it up. Try starting a little higher with the hips and bending the bar before you pull.

I think the last thing you said here will help. I've heard people say pulling the slack out of the bar. Basically just being completely tight and leaning back slightly before actually initiating the lift I guess